Stein 2051

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Coordinates: Sky map 04h 31m 11.52059s, +58° 58′ 37.4806″

Stein 2051
Einstein revisited.jpg
Stein 2051 taken by Hubble Space Telescope.[1]
Credit: NASA, ESA, and K. Sahu (STScI)
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Camelopardalis
Stein 2051 A
Right ascension 04h 31m 11.5181s[2]
Declination +58° 58′ 37.461″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 10.977[2]
Stein 2051 B
Right ascension 04h 31m 12.570s[3]
Declination +58° 58′ 41.15″[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 11.19[3]
Characteristics
Stein 2051 A
Spectral type M4.0Ve[2]
U−B color index +1.21[4]
B−V color index +1.65[4]
Stein 2051 B
Spectral type DC5[3]
U−B color index -0.53[4]
B−V color index +0.31[4]
Astrometry
Stein 2051 A
Radial velocity (Rv) 29 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 1300.2[5] mas/yr
Dec.: -2049.0[5] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 180 ± 0.8[2] mas
Distance 18.12 ± 0.08 ly
(5.56 ± 0.02 pc)
Stein 2051 B
Radial velocity (Rv) 2.0 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 1335.6[5] mas/yr
Dec.: -1962.6[5] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 179 ± 3[3] mas
Distance 18.2 ± 0.3 ly
(5.59 ± 0.09 pc)
Other designations
Stein 2051, G 175-34, HIP 21088,[6] WDS J04312+5858AB, GJ 169.1,[7] PLX 986.01[8]
Stein 2051 A: LHS 26, NLTT 13373, TYC 3744-412-1, 2MASS J04311147+585837, WISE J043113.20+585816.7[2]
Stein 2051 B: EGGR 180, LHS 27, NLTT 13375, TYC 3744-2062-1, 2MASS J04311201+5858476, WD 0426+58, WD2 0426+585, WD3 0426+588[3]
Database references
SIMBAD The system
A
B

Stein 2051 (Gliese 169.1, G 175-034, LHS 26/27) is a nearby binary star system, containing a red dwarf (component A) and a degenerate star (white dwarf) (component B), located in constellation Camelopardalis at about 18 ly from Earth.[8]

Stein 2051 is the nearest (red dwarf + white dwarf) separate binary system (40 Eridani BC is located closer at 16.26 light-years,[9] but it is a part of a triple star system).

Stein 2051 B is the 6th nearest white dwarf after Sirius B, Procyon B, van Maanen's star, LP 145-141 and 40 Eridani B.

Properties[edit]

The brighter of this two stars is A (a red dwarf), but the more massive is component B (a white dwarf).

In 2017, Stein 2051 B was observed passing in front of a more distant star. The bending of starlight by the gravitational field of the nearer star allowed its mass to be directly measured. The estimated mass of Stein 2051 B is 0.675±0.051 M, which fits the expected range of a white dwarf with a carbon-oxygen core.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Einstein revisited". www.spacetelescope.org. Retrieved 12 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "NAME Stein 2051 A". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 26 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "NAME Stein 2051 B". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 20 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Hardie, R. H. (1966). "UBV Photometry of the Lowell Proper Motion Object G175-34". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 78 (462): 171. Bibcode:1966PASP...78..171H. doi:10.1086/128321. 
  5. ^ a b c d Zacharias, N. (2012). "The fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4)". VizieR On-line Data Catalog. Bibcode:2012yCat.1322....0Z. 
  6. ^ Perryman; et al. (1997). "HIP 21088". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. Retrieved 2014-11-23. 
  7. ^ Gliese, W. & Jahreiß, H. (1991). "Gl 169.1". Preliminary Version of the Third Catalogue of Nearby Stars. Retrieved 2014-11-23. 
  8. ^ a b Van Altena W. F.; Lee J. T.; Hoffleit E. D. (1995). "GCTP 986.01". The General Catalogue of Trigonometric Stellar Parallaxes (Fourth ed.). Retrieved 2014-11-23. 
  9. ^ Perryman; et al. (1997). "HIP 19849". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. Retrieved 2014-11-21. 
  10. ^ Sahu, Kailash C.; et al. (June 2017), "Relativistic deflection of background starlight measures the mass of a nearby white dwarf star", Science, 356 (6342): 1046−1050, Bibcode:2017Sci...356.1046S, arXiv:1706.02037Freely accessible, doi:10.1126/science.aal2879. 

External links[edit]