Stephen Pollington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Stephen Pollington is an English historian who specialises in the study of Anglo-Saxon England and the Old English language who has written a number of books on the subject, most of which have been published by the company Anglo-Saxon Books.

In 2010, Pollington co-authored Wayland's Work: Anglo-Saxon Art, Myth and Material Culture 4th-7th Century with Lindsay Kerr and Brett Hammond. It received a positive review in Antiquaries Journal for its "synthesis of current knowledge."[1] The Council for British Archaeology's magazine British Archaeology, however, was largely critical of the use of "original research and non specialist summary."[2] A paper based on his keynote speech at the Cambridge conference ‘Medieval Feasting, Hospitality and Gift-Exchange’ (August 2009) was published as ‘The Mead-Hall Community’ in Journal of Medieval History Volume 37, Issue 1, March 2011.

He provided the voice of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for the Mayavision - BBC television series King Alfred and the Anglo Saxons in which the Chronicle entries were read in Old English.

Pollington co-authored a report on the making of a replica of the Sutton Hoo stone with Paul Mortimer and its wider implications, from which he was invited to present a paper at the Wystawa podczas konferencji archeologicznej w Bytowie in September 2014 (proceedings forthcoming).

Pollington was formerly a trustee of the Steadfast Trust, an English nationalist charity founded in 2004 by Tony Linsell which is based in Macclesfield, Cheshire.[3]

Publications[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Antiquaries Journal 1 September 2011 91 : pp 366–367
  2. ^ Hills 2011. pp. 54 and 56.
  3. ^ "Ultra-right conservative and quasi-patriotic organisations active in Britain". Searchlight. 1 January 2013. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. 

References[edit]

Academic books
  • Hills, Catherine (September–October 2011). "Book review of Waylands Work". British Archaeology. 120: 54–56. 

Further reading[edit]