Steve Matteson

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Steven R. Matteson (born 1965, Chicago, Illinois) is an American typeface designer whose work is included in several computer operating systems and embedded in game consoles, cell phones and other electronic devices.[1] He is the designer of the Microsoft font family Segoe included since Windows XP;[2] of the Droid font collection used in the Android mobile device platform,[3] and designed the brand and user-interface fonts used in both the original Microsoft Xbox and the Xbox 360.[4]

Biography[edit]

Matteson is a 1988 graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology where he studied typography, design and printing. Upon graduation, he spent two years learning font hinting technology while employed at laser-printer manufacturer QMS.

In 1990 Matteson began work at Monotype Corporation (later Agfa-Monotype) contributing to the creation of the Windows 3.1x core TrueType fonts: Arial, Times New Roman and Courier New.[5]

Matteson produced fonts for the Agfa-Monotype library (such as Goudy Ornate and Gill Floriated Capitals) and directed custom-font design for companies including Agilent Technologies,[6] Symantec and Microsoft.[7] Matteson designed Andalé Mono as a mono-spaced command line and coding font for Taligent. The font is now bundled with Mac OS X and was one of the original Core fonts for the Web.

Matteson directed custom-type development for Agfa-Monotype until 2003. In 2004 he became a founding partner and Director of Type Design at Ascender Corporation in Elk Grove Village, Illinois.[8]

In 2005, Matteson designed the font family Convection for use in the branding and user-interface of Microsoft’s Xbox 360 game console. Matteson also designed the user-interface font used in Microsoft’s Zune music player.[9] In 2007 software maker Red Hat released the open-source Liberation fonts family designed by Matteson.[10] Also in 2007, Matteson designed the Droid family of fonts included in the Android mobile-phone platform supported by the Open Handset Alliance.

Fonts designed by Steve Matteson[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Steve Matteson interview". MyFonts. Archived from the original on March 30, 2016. Retrieved April 8, 2016.
  2. ^ Livingston, Brian (April 25, 2006). "Designer Says Vista Font is Original". Archived from the original on March 2, 2007.
  3. ^ "Font & Technology Specialists | Monotype". www.monotype.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  4. ^ Desktop - Australian Design, Digital Culture, Melbourne, Australia
  5. ^ "Steve Matteson : MyFonts". Archived from the original on February 19, 2008. Retrieved February 11, 2008.
  6. ^ "Font & Technology Specialists | Monotype". www.monotype.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  7. ^ "Font & Technology Specialists | Monotype". www.monotype.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  8. ^ "Font & Technology Specialists | Monotype". www.monotype.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  9. ^ "Font & Technology Specialists | Monotype". www.monotype.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  10. ^ "The world's open source leader". www.redhat.com. Archived from the original on April 27, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  11. ^ "Beyond Calibri: Finding Microsoft's next default font - Microsoft 365 Blog". Microsoft. April 28, 2021. Archived from the original on April 28, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  12. ^ "Noto FAQ". Google Noto Fonts. Archived from the original on September 18, 2019. Retrieved September 29, 2019.