Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1938–39)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
State of New South Wales (1915–1938)

The Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1938–1939) or Third Stevens–Bruxner ministry or Third Stevens ministry was the 48th ministry of the New South Wales Government, and was led by the 25th Premier, the Honourable Bertram Stevens, MLA, in a United Australia Party coalition with the Country Party, that was led by the Honourable Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Bruxner, DSO, MLA. The ministry was the third of three occasions when the Government was led by Stevens, as Premier; and third of four occasions where Bruxner served as Deputy Premier.

Stevens was first elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1927 and served continuously until 1940. Having served as a senior minister in the Bavin ministry, following the defeat of the Nationalist coalition led by Bavin, who was in poor health,[1] at the 1932 state election, Stevens was elected leader of the newly formed United Australia Party (UAP) in New South Wales and became Opposition Leader. Bruxner was first elected to the Assembly in 1920 and served continuously until 1962. Initially a member of the Progressive Party, he served as party leader in opposition between 1922 and 1925; and resumed leadership in 1932, following the resignation of his successor, Ernest Buttenshaw. By this stage, the party was renamed as the Country Party.

The Stevens–Bruxner coalition came to power as a result of the Lang Dismissal Crisis, when the Governor of New South Wales, Philip Game used the reserve power of The Crown to remove Jack Lang as Premier, asking Stevens to form government. Going to the pollls a month later, Stevens/Bruxner won a landslide victory at the 1932 state election and were re-elected at the 1935 and 1938 state elections, albeit with reduced margins.

This ministry covers the period from 13 April 1938 until 5 August 1939[2][3] when the deputy leader of the UAP, Eric Spooner resigned from cabinet and on 1 August 1939, moved a no confidence motion against Stevens for not running a balanced budget. Stevens resigned as Premier and Leader of the UAP, and was succeeded by Alexander Mair, who formed a coalition with Bruxner.[4]

Composition of ministry[edit]

First arrangement[edit]

The composition of the ministry was announced by Premier Stevens on 13 April 1938 and covers the period until 13 October 1938 when there was a minor rearrangement, unless the Minister retains the portfolio for the full term. Ministers are listed in order of seniority.

Portfolio Minister Party Term commence Term end Term of office
Premier a Hon. Bertram Stevens, MLA   UAP 13 April 1938 5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
Colonial Treasurer   13 October 1938 183 days
Deputy Premier
Minister for Transport
Hon. Lieut-Colonel Michael Bruxner, DSO, MLA   Country 5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
Attorney–General
Vice-President of the Executive Council
Representative of the Government in Legislative Council
Hon. Henry Manning, KC, BA, LLB, MLC   UAP
Secretary for Public Works
Minister for Local Government
Hon. Eric Spooner, MLA b   21 July 1939 1 year, 99 days
Minister of Education Hon. David Drummond, MLA   Country 5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
Minister for Labour and Industry Hon. John Dunninghan, MLA c   UAP 26 May 1938 43 days
Hon. Alexander Mair, MLA   1 June 1938 13 October 1938 134 days
Assistant Minister   13 April 1938 1 June 1938 49 days
Minister for Justice Hon. Lewis Martin, BA, LLB, MLA   5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
Minister for Health Hon. Herbert FitzSimons, MLA  
Minister for Social Services Hon. Herbert Hawkins, MLC   13 October 1938 183 days
Colonial Secretary Hon. George Gollan, MLA   5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
Minister for Lands Hon. Colin Sinclair, BA, LLB, MLA   Country
Minister for Agriculture Hon. Major Albert Reid, MC, MLA  
Honorary Minister Hon. Athol Richardson   UAP 13 October 1938 183 days
Secretary for Mines
Minister for Forests
Hon. Roy Vincent, MLA   Country 5 August 1939 1 year, 114 days
^a Resigned as Premier as a result of a no confidence motion being passed
^b Spooner, Deputy Leader of the UAP, resigned in protest against Stevens and his ability to run a balanced budget. Spooner went on to move a motion of no confidence in Stevens that resulted in Stevens resigning as Premier.
^c Died in office

Second arrangement[edit]

The composition of the ministry was announced by Premier Stevens on 13 October 1938 and covers the period until 5 August 1939 when Stevens resigned as Premier. Ministers are listed in order of seniority. Only changes in portfolios are shown.

Portfolio Minister Party Term commence Term end Term of office
Colonial Treasurer Hon. Alexander Mair, MLA   UAP 13 October 1938 5 August 1939 296 days
Minister for Labour and Industry Hon. Herbert Hawkins, MLC a   16 June 1939 246 days
Hon. Athol Richardson, MLA   26 June 1939 5 August 1939 40 days
Minister for Social Services   13 October 1938 296 days
Member of the Executive Council
Assistant Minister
Hon. Hubert Primrose, MLA   26 June 1939 40 days
Hon. Marsden Manfred, MLC  
Secretary for Public Works
Minister for Local Government
Hon. Bertram Stevens, MLA   21 July 1939 15 days
^a Died in office

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McCarthy, John. "Bavin, Sir Thomas Rainsford". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 24 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Former Members - Chronological List of Ministries 1856 to 2009 (requires download)". Project for the Sesquicentenary of Responsible Government in NSW. Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original (Excel spreadsheet) on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  3. ^ Wah, Malvyne Jong; Page, Jeffrey E. (November 2007). "New South Wales Parliamentary Record 1824 – 2007" (PDF). VIII. Parliament of New South Wales: 274–275. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Ward, John M. "Stevens, Sir Bertram Sydney Barnsdale (1889 - 1973)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 24 March 2012. 
Preceded by
Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1935–1938)
Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1938–1939)
1938–1939
Succeeded by
Mair–Bruxner ministry