Stingers

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For other uses, see Stinger (disambiguation).
Stingers
Created by Guy Wilding
Mikael Borglund
Michael Messenger (programme writer)
Tony Morphett
Starring Peter Phelps
Kate Kendall
Anita Hegh
Joe Petruzzi
Roxane Wilson
Ian Stenlake
Jessica Napier
Jacinta Stapleton
Daniel Fredriksen
Lisa Chappell
Gary Sweet
Country of origin Australia
No. of episodes 192
Production
Running time approx 44:00
(plus commercials)
Production company(s) Beyond Television Productions
Release
Original channel Nine Network
Original release 29 September 1998 – 14 December 2004

Stingers (1998–2004) was an Australian police drama television series. It ran for eight seasons on the Nine Network before it was canceled in late 2004 due to declining ratings and the late timeslot Channel Nine gave the program. The series has also aired in 65 countries, including Canada, Denmark, Egypt, France, Gibraltar, Iran, Ireland, Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

Inspired by true events, Stingers chronicled the cases of a deep undercover unit of the Victoria Police. The series also followed their personal lives, which sometimes became intertwined with their jobs. The show received average ratings during its debut season, but after some major changes, including intensive character development, the series turned out to be a success during the following year. The original cast members include Peter Phelps, Joe Petruzzi, Kate Kendall, Ian Stenlake, Anita Hegh, and Jessica Napier. All except Kendall and Phelps left the show during its run.

Cast[edit]

  • Senior Constable Peter Church – Peter Phelps (1998–2004, Ep 1 to 192)
  • (Detective) Constable Angie Piper – Kate Kendall (1998–2004, Ep 1 to 192)
  • Det-Sen Sgt. Bernie Rocca – Joe Petruzzi (1998–1999, Ep 1 to 44)
  • Constable Oscar Stone – Ian Stenlake (1998–2002, Ep 1 to 110)
  • Det-Sen Sgt. (originally Det-Sgt.) Ellen 'Mac' Mackenzie – Anita Hegh (1998–2002, Ep 1 to 110)
  • Constable Daniella Mayo – Roxane Wilson (2000–2002, Ep 45 to 114)
  • Detective Inspector Luke Harris – Gary Sweet (2002–2004, Ep 111 to 192)
  • Constable (originally Probationary Constable) Christina Dichiera – Jacinta Stapleton (2002–2004, Ep 112 to 192)
  • Senior Detective Leo Flynn – Daniel Frederiksen (2003–2004, Ep 136 to 192)

Semi-regulars and other cast[edit]

  • Senior Detective (briefly demoted from Detective Inspector) Bill Hollister (Head of Homicide) – Nicholas Bell (Seasons 1–4)
  • Det-Sen Sgt. Reg 'The Ferret' Masters (Head of Vice Squad/Head of Drugs Squad) – Richard Morgan (Seasons 2–8)
  • Det-Sen Sgt. Bryan Gray (Head of Armed Robbery/Senior Detective for Special Investigations) – Jeremy Kewley (Seasons 3–8)
  • Det-Insp. Harry Love (Head of Homicide) – Martin Jacobs (Season 5)
  • Det-Insp. Frank Callahan (Head of Homicide) – David Swann (Seasons 3-5)
  • Det-Sen Sgt. Eric Chatterly (Senior Homicide Detective, possibly Acting Head of Homicide) – John Ridley (Seasons 2-8)
  • Det. Nick Jardine - Andy Rodoreda (Season 5)
  • Marty Engle (Informant/Angie's Fiance) - Jim Russell (Season 5)
  • Det. Insp. Andrew Bligh (Internal Affairs) - Russell Kiefel (Seasons 3-7)
  • Criminal Barrister Ingrid Burton – Rebecca Gibney (Seasons 6–7)
  • Sophie Novak – Katrina Milosevic (Seasons 7–8)
  • Detective Katherine Marks – Gigi Edgley (Season 8)
  • Constable Megan Walsh – Lisa Chappell (Season 8)
  • Samantha Piper - Angie's younger sister - Asher Keddie (Seasons 3-8)

Deceased cast members[edit]

Richard Morgan, who played Det-Sen Sgt. Reg Masters from 1999 until 2004, died of motor neurone disease on 23 December 2006. Morgan also appeared on The Sullivans, A Country Practice, Sons and Daughters, MDA, Blue Heelers and Something in the Air.

Series history[edit]

On Sunday 16 July 2006 at 2 p.m., Executive Producer John Wild and Script Producer Marcia Gardner sat down with an audience at ACMI in Federation Square in Melbourne to "explore the narrative arc and character development from the first episodes to the final series." The event took place in the Screen Pit and was free to the public. Also in attendance was cast member Jeremy Kewley who posted the following rundown of the discussion for the Stingers forum:

It first began airing up towards the end of the year, on Monday nights. It was up against another new show on Channel Seven, Ally McBeal, and Stingers beat McBeal regularly for its first 11 weeks before it went on its Christmas ratings break. When both shows returned after the ratings break, McBeal began to win in the ratings quite comfortably, worrying Nine executives.

At this time Channel Nine and the producers had to work out how to win ratings back, and found that the reason why so many people preferred Ally McBeal over Stingers was because Stingers had a very rough, edgy and realistic feel to it, and that this did not appeal to women of all ages, who preferred the lightness of McBeal. So Stingers was moved to Tuesday night. This helped a bit, but not enough. Channel Nine were thinking about canceling the show, but Nine owner Kerry Packer liked the show and suggested that they keep it on the air. Nine did, but moved it an hour later to 9.30pm Tuesdays, and Stingers started to find its audience (although this was still not a big one). It stayed at this timeslot until the end of 7th season which seemed to be predominately male middle class white collar workers between the ages of 30–55.

By the middle of the second season, ratings were still not spectacular enough and Channel Nine commissioned research which showed that women were not particularly interested in Stingers. As women make up 50% of the audience the producers were told to make the first major change to Stingers: make it more female-friendly. This led to the departure of Joe Petruzzi, making Anita Hegh's character the boss of the Unit. This also led to another female character being introduced, undercover operative Danni Mayo, portrayed by Roxane Wilson. This led to the show becoming more 'lighter' to appeal to the female audiences. Soon after, humour was added to the show, in the form of Jeremy Kewley's character, Bryan Gray. These changes worked well and Stingers steamed through Seasons 3, 4 and 5, but then Anita Hegh and Ian Stenlake decided to leave the show, causing another drastic change in the series.

Channel Nine, on a nationwide cost-cutting drive, hinted at dropping the show because Stingers' was considered too expensive; its budget had crept up from its original $440,000-per-episode cost, to around $480,000. They dropped a bombshell on the producers: shave around $130,000 every week from the budget or the show would have to cease production. A huge ask, but everyone at Stingers was keen to keep going as everyone felt there were still life in the show and plenty of stories to tell.

By the start of the next season the budget was chopped down to $350,000 per episode. Shooting changed from six days per episode to five, stock changed from 16 mm film to SP Betacam Videotape, the crew became smaller, and writers were given less time to write each episode. The location changed from the "Crimplex" (warehouse/studio/offices by the Yarra River) to the studios of Channel Nine in Richmond. Channel Nine spent money on a big new set (plus a new "hospital ward" set and a new "pub/bar" set) and justified the cost by making sure that most of the action on the show now took place inside the studio on the new sets, with a lot less time spent on locations, with less money spent on car chases, stunts and special effects.

Channel Nine also wanted more "star power" in the show, so Gary Sweet was brought in as Luke Harris (and Roxane Wilson decided to leave), and Rebecca Gibney – now out of a job without Halifax f.p. – was cast for the first few episodes of the new season. Most of these major changes worked quite well, and most viewers at home would not have been too aware of the changes to the visual quality of the show (such as using tape instead of film).

But, as Executive Producer John Wild humorously pointed out, "the ratings didn't change one point!" Channel Nine commissioned more surveys that told them the show needed to appeal to younger viewers. So two new characters were added, played by Daniel Frederiksen and Jacinta Stapleton, and, John Wild said, "and the ratings still didn't change one point!" Channel Nine insisted that still more star power was needed to lift the ratings, so Lisa Chappell (Logie winning McLeod's Daughters star) joined the cast. After still no improvement to the ratings, more star power was further added in guest roles with Bill Hunter, Gigi Edgley, Steve Bisley, Tottie Goldsmith. No improvement still.

Stingers was then "rested" for a couple of weeks and replaced by repeats of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and these repeats rated better than first-run episodes of Stingers (screening a repeat episode of CSI probably[vague] costs the network about $25,000 as opposed to a first-run episode of Stingers at $350,000).

It became clear what Nine would do: move Stingers to 10.30pm on a permanent basis and put higher-rating repeats of CSI on at 9.30 p.m. Channel Nine in Adelaide did not like this move and moved Stingers to 9:30 Monday nights, however this only lasted for five weeks before it was moved back to 10:30 on a Tuesday night; such a move to a later timeslot caused Stingers’ ratings to drop even lower, giving Nine reason to finally end the show. Stingers’ curse seemed to be that it always rated well, but it never rated spectacularly.

Plot[edit]

Inspired by true events, Stingers chronicled the cases of a deep undercover unit of the Australian police. The series also followed their personal lives, which sometimes became intertwined with their jobs. The original unit was composed of Senior Detective Peter Church (whose real name was Mike Fischer) played by Peter Phelps, Senior Detective Angie Piper (Kate Kendall), Constable Oscar Stone (whose real name was Cameron Pierce) played by Ian Stenlake, Det-Sgt. Ellen 'Mac' Mackenzie (Anita Hegh) and Det-Sen Sgt. Bernie Rocca (Joe Petruzzi), who led the unit. Rocca was shot and left the unit in season two, and Mac became the new head.

Constable Danni Mayo (Roxane Wilson) joined the unit in season three, while season five saw two casualties: Stone was killed while Mac ran away with a diamond robber. Detective Inspector Luke Harris (Gary Sweet) took over as head of the unit until the end of the series, and Danni quit the force after being enraged by him. Constable Christina Dichiera (Jacinta Stapleton) joined the unit in season six. Her real name is Felicity Matthews, but this was not known to the force, as she had a criminal history under that name. Senior Detective Leo Flynn (Daniel Frederiksen) joined in season seven.

Season eight saw the arrival of Detective Katherine Marks, who was revealed as Harris' daughter from his first marriage. The revelation also ended Harris and Angie's already shaky relationship, which had produced a son.

Episodes[edit]

Season one (1998–99)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 1 "Ratcatcher" 29 September 1998
When a Homicide investigation into the disappearance of a teenage babysitter fails to reveal any useful evidence, Church and Angie go undercover to infiltrate a sinister criminal family.
2 2 "Hit Me" 6 October 1998
Someone is looking to hire a hitman, so Church goes undercover. His client is a woman who claims that her husband is trying to kill her. She wants him dead before he succeeds.
3 3 "The Initiation" 13 October 1998
A policeman has been shot. Undercover is called upon to infiltrate a suspected Romanian gang, but they don't deal with outsiders. Rocca must rely on an ex-undercover operative who could potentially jeopardize the job and the unit.
4 4 "Show the Dead Mouse: Part 1" 20 October 1998
Undercover is called in to a serial killer case. When Angie's cover is blown, Kaye becomes her replacement. Her first solo job is going well until all contact with her is lost and she vanishes.
5 5 "Show the Dead Mouse: Part 2" 27 October 1998

Following Kay's disappearance, the Unit goes into damage control, scrutinizing the surveillance footage and following up on the few leads they have - a process that provides an unexpected suspect.

Final Appearance of Jessica Napier as Constable Kaye Kelso
6 6 "Backlash" 3 November 1998
Whilst undercover, Church is employed by a brutal mercenary, Cameron Fraser, to assist in the abduction of a young girl. After a botched attempt, Fraser successfully tails Church, putting the security of the unit at risk.
7 7 "Innocents Abroad" 10 November 1998
Following the drug-related death of a young clubber, the unit attempts to crack a large scale Ecstasy racket.
8 8 "Blind Love" 17 November 1998
Mackenzie is put undercover on the witness protection scheme to befriend a victim of attempted murder because of her connections with a leading politician who is suspected of corruption.
9 9 "Jelly Babies" 24 November 1998
While taking part in a buy/bust, Church and his dealer inadvertently get caught up in a siege instigated by three teenage criminals.
10 10 "Nothing Personal" 22 February 1999
The Professional Integrity Unit investigations goes undercover over claims of corrupt handling. After evidence leads to Rocca's suspension, the unit wants to know what's going on.
11 11 "Ten Feet Tall and Bullet Proof" 1 March 1999
Church is forced to drop his longtime team informant, Benny. Benny is outraged, but as a last hurrah, he gives Church information about a planned armoured van robbery.
12 12 "Faking It" 8 March 1999
Working undercover, Church sets up a buy/bust which turns sour after Stone is bashed and falls into a coma. Emotions run high as Church is forced to remain undercover.
13 13 "Right on Target" 15 March 1999
After Stone is nearly shot during a meeting with a dealer, Mac is worried about Stone's well-being when an informant helps Stone penetrate a gun dealing ring.
14 14 "Without Fear or Favour" 6 April 1999
The Unit goes undercover to locate a charismatic prison escapee, Kane, who accuses the police of wanting him dead rather than recaptured.
15 15 "Lunatic Fringe: Part 1" 13 April 1999
Stone and Angie go undercover to infiltrate "Mother Earth," a radical environmental group suspected of stealing explosives. Church is put in prison to befriend Aaron Feilder, the psychopathic leader of the group.
16 16 "Lunatic Fringe: Part 2" 20 April 1999
Church encounters Stone as part of the environmental extremist group. Stone wants to report to the unit but Church, driven by his own agenda, insists that any contact would jeopardise the sting.
17 17 "Talker" 27 April 1999
Someone is killing prostitutes and when another woman is found murdered, Mackenzie and Angie go undercover at a brothel.
18 18 "Into the Cold" 4 May 1999
When Church goes undercover to investigate a murder, he inadvertently ingratiates himself with the Rossis, a criminal family currently the target of an independent inquiry. Church is ordered to remain undercover.
19 19 "Lone Hand" 11 April 1999
With the help of the unit, Church manages to impress Dino Rossi and weaken the position of his right-hand man, who is resentful of Church being accepted into the ranks.
20 20 "Proving Ground" 18 April 1999
Mackenzie and Angie face an Internal Affairs investigation when an informant commits suicide.
21 21 "Cast Off" 25 May 1999
While the Unit learns of Church's relationship with Christina, Church is forced to come to terms with Christina's involvement with the family business and refuses to testify against Dino.
22 22 "Dead Man's Throw" 1 June 1999
Information comes to light that someone is trying to sell Dino details about Church. With his identity revealed, it is a deadly race against time for Church to save his relationship and his life.

Season two (1999)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 23 "Salsa: Part 1" 8 June 1999
...
2 24 "Salsa: Part 2" 15 June 1999
...
3 25 "Set for Life" 22 June 1999
...
4 26 "The Big Picture" 29 June 1999
...
5 27 "Rat Trap" 6 July 1999
...
6 28 "Finders Keepers" 29 July 1999
...
7 29 "Playing with the Celibate Dead" 27 July 1999
...
8 30 "White Lies" 3 August 1999
...
9 31 "Mr. Right" 10 August 1999
...
10 32 "The Favour" 17 August 1999
...
11 33 "Judas Kiss" 31 August 1999
...
12 34 "Counting the Beat" 7 September 1999
...
13 35 "Just Acting" 14 September 1999
...
14 36 "Unnatural Justice" 21 September 1999
...
15 37 "Dance with the Dragon" 28 September 1999
...
16 38 "The Long Haul" 5 October 1999
...
17 39 "Swarm" 12 October 1999
...
18 40 "Men in the Dark" 19 October 1999
...
19 41 "Full Term" 26 October 1999
...
20 42 "House Rules" 2 November 1999
...
21 43 "Signal One" 9 November 1999
...
22 44 "The Dingo" 16 November 1999
...

Season three (2000)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 45 "Brilliant Lies" 14 June 2000
...
2 46 "Forced Perspective" 21 June 2000
...
3 47 "Which Bank?" 28 June 2000
...
4 48 "Twisted Sister" 1 August 2000
...
5 49 "Unplaced Favourite" 8 August 2000
...
6 50 "No Way Out" 15 August 2000
...
7 51 "Necessary Force" 22 August 2000
...
8 52 "No Pain, No Gain" 29 August 2000
...
9 53 "HeartLine" 9 May 2000
...
10 54 "Mob Rules" 12 September 2000
...
11 55 "A Marriage to Die For" 12 September 2000
...
12 56 "In Too Deep" 19 September 2000
...
13 57 "The Last Hit" 19 September 2000
...
14 58 "Fine Details" 26 September 2000
...
15 59 "Truly, Madly, Deeply" 3 October 2000
...
16 60 "The Good Life" 17 October 2000
...
17 61 "Second Chance" 24 October 2000
...
18 62 "Every Move You Make" 31 October 2000
...
19 63 "A Matter of Trust" 7 November 2000
...
20 64 "Spare Parts" 14 November 2000
...
21 65 "Organised Crime" 21 November 2000
...
22 66 "Something Old, Something New" 21 November 2000
...

Season four (2001)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 67 "Snakehead" 14 August 2001
...
2 68 "Rich Man's World" 21 August 2001
...
3 69 "Beyond Redemption" 28 August 2001
...
4 70 "Tell Me You Love Me" 11 September 2001
...
5 71 "Fool to Want You" 18 September 2001
...
6 72 "Family Values" 25 September 2001
...
7 73 "Whatever It Takes" 2 October 2001
...
8 74 "Into the Darkness" 10 October 2001
...
9 75 "Foster Cops" 17 October 2001
...
10 76 "The Whisper Room" 23 October 2001
...
11 77 "Feud" 24 October 2001
...
12 78 "One of Us" 30 October 2001
...
13 79 "Slice" 31 October 2001
...
14 80 "Dog Eat Dog" 6 November 2001
...
15 81 "Love Hurts" 7 November 2001
...
16 82 "Psychotic Episode" 20 November 2001
...
17 83 "Closure" 21 November 2001
...
18 84 "True Colours" 21 November 2001
...
19 85 "Too Many Crooks" 27 November 2001
...
20 86 "Just Another Day" 27 November 2001
...
21 87 "Reunion" 28 November 2001
...
22 88 "Do the Right Thing" 28 November 2001
...

Season five (2002)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 89 "Thin Ice" 5 February 2002
...
2 90 "An Anonymous Guy" 12 February 2002
...
3 91 "Cash on Delivery" 19 February 2002
...
4 92 "What's Love Got to Do with It?" 27 February 2002
...
5 93 "A Little Crush" 5 March 2002
...
6 94 "No Promises" 12 March 2002
...
7 95 "Mule Train" 19 March 2002
...
8 96 "White Ants" 26 March 2002
...
9 97 "In the Gun" 2 April 2002
...
10 98 "In Plain View" 9 April 2002
...
11 99 "Fatal Flaw" 16 April 2002
...
12 100 "Trust" 23 April 2002
...
13 101 "Big Fish" 30 April 2002
...
14 102 "DMZ" 7 May 2002
...
15 103 "Blow Off" 14 May 2002
...
16 104 "Inside Man" 21 May 2002
...
17 105 "Mind Games" 28 May 2002
...
18 106 "Disgraceful Conduct" 4 June 2002
...
19 107 "Smoke and Mirrors" 2 July 2002
...
20 108 "Too Much Information" 9 July 2002
...
21 109 "Pale Horse" 16 July 2002
...
22 110 "A Girl's Best Friend" 23 July 2002
...

Season six (2002)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 111 "Collateral Damage" 13 August 2002
...
2 112 "The Last Dance" 20 August 2002
...
3 113 "Teamwork" 3 September 2002
...
4 114 "Looking After Number One" 10 September 2002
...
5 115 "Old Scores" 24 September 2002
...
6 116 "Separation Anxiety" 1 October 2002
...
7 117 "Slow Hand, Easy Touch" 8 October 2002
...
8 118 "Scratch Me Lucky" 15 October 2002
...
9 119 "Payback" 22 October 2002
...
10 120 "The Whole Truth" 29 October 2002
...
11 121 "Breakdown" 5 November 2002
...
12 122 "Partners in Crime" 12 November 2002
...
13 123 "Revenge of the Turtles" 19 November 2002
...
14 124 "Uriel's Sword" 26 November 2002
...

Season seven (2003–04)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 125 "Lies and Secrets" 25 March 2003
...
2 126 "Pentimento" 1 April 2003
...
3 127 "Cul-De-Sac" 8 April 2003
...
4 128 "Your Cheating Heart" 15 April 2003
...
5 129 "Don't Look Back" 22 April 2003
...
6 130 "Snakes in the Grass" 29 April 2003
...
7 131 "Aftershocks" 6 May 2003
...
8 132 "Priapus' Playground" 13 May 2003
...
9 133 "The Eighth Day" 20 May 2003
...
10 134 "Sex & Drugs & Deep House" 27 May 2003
...
11 135 "New Blood" 3 June 2003
...
12 136 "Cold War" 10 June 2003
...
13 137 "Acts of Love" 17 June 2003
...
14 138 "Heartbeat" 24 June 2003
...
15 139 "Sons & Lovers" 1 July 2003
...
16 140 "It Started with a Kiss" 8 July 2003
...
17 141 "Wild Card" 15 July 2003
...
18 142 "Practice of Deceit" 22 July 2003
...
19 143 "Killing Heidi" 29 July 2003
...
20 144 "Sleeping with the Enemy" 5 August 2003
...
21 145 "A Horse Is a Horse" 12 August 2003
...
22 146 "Conversations with the Dead" 19 August 2003
...
23 147 "Free Radical" 26 August 2003
...
24 148 "Daddy's Little Diamond" 2 September 2003
...
25 149 "Time Out" 9 September 2003
...
26 150 "Perfect Match" 16 September 2003
...
27 151 "Boosted" 23 September 2003
...
28 152 "One Perfect Day" 30 September 2003
...
29 153 "Troppo Fest" 7 October 2003
...
30 154 "Train Wreck" 14 October 2003
...
31 155 "The Thin Blue Line" 21 October 2003
...
32 156 "Love's Labours Lost" 28 October 2003
The undercover squad are working on a drug sting in the rave scene when they discover that the drug dealer's 12-year-old daughter is the girlfriend of Detective Bryan Gray's teenage son Frank. When Bryan finds out, his response is typically insensitive and it jeopardizes the operation. But it leads to a watershed in Bryan's strained relationship with his son and forces Luke Harris to re-appraise Bryan Gray. Meanwhile Luke is pressuring Angie to give their very brief marriage one more go. He wines and dines his estranged wife, but it seems she can't be won over.
33 157 "Fashion Victim" 28 October 2003
...
34 158 "Total Recall" 9 March 2004
...
35 159 "The Wrong Man" 16 March 2004
...
36 160 "The Weakest Link" 23 March 2004
...
37 161 "Twilight" 30 March 2004
...
38 162 "The Object of My Affection" 6 April 2004
...
39 163 "From Russia with Love" 13 April 2004
...
40 164 "Cops and Robbers" 20 April 2004
...

Season eight (2004)[edit]

Number
in series
Number
in season
Title Original air date
1 165 "Hammer Horror" 27 April 2004
...
2 166 "A Square Inside the Circle" 25 May 2004
...
3 167 "Family Ties" 1 June 2004
...
4 168 "The River of No Return" 8 June 2004
...
5 169 "Brave New World" 15 June 2004
...
6 170 "No Man's Land" 22 June 2004
...
7 171 "One More Chance" 29 June 2004
...
8 172 "Break and Enter" 6 July 2004
...
9 173 "House of Mirrors" 13 July 2004
...
10 174 "House of Mirrors" 20 July 2004
...
11 175 "Starlight Hotel" 27 July 2004
...
12 176 "The Complete Package" 3 August 2004
...
13 177 "The Contract" 10 August 2004
...
14 178 "Vanished" 17 August 2004
...
15 179 "Mea Culpa" 23 August 2004
...
16 180 "Past Lives" 30 August 2004
...
17 181 "I Am the Walrus" 7 September 2004
...
18 182 "Dream Machine" 14 September 2004
...
19 183 "The Good Oil" 21 September 2004
...
20 184 "Dirty Little Secrets" 28 September 2004
...
21 185 "Being Josh Brisbane" 3 October 2004
...
22 186 "End Game" 19 October 2004
...
23 187 "Random Harvest" 26 October 2004
...
24 188 "Hunting Ground" 2 November 2004
...
25 189 "Year of the Snake" 9 November 2004
...
26 190 "Head On" 30 November 2004
...
27 191 "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" 7 December 2004
...
28 192 "After the Fact" 14 December 2004
...

DVD releases[edit]

DVD name Ep # Discs Region 4 (Australia) DVD Special Features
Season One 22 6 September 4, 2006 None
Season Two 22 6 March 14, 2007 None
Season Three 22 6 June 4, 2007 None
Season Four 22 6 December 7, 2007 None
Season Five 22 6 June 11, 2008 None
Season Six 14 4 January 6, 2009 None
Season Seven 40 10 June 10, 2009 None
Season Eight 28 7 August 4, 2009 None
Stingers The Complete Series 192 51 May 1, 2013 None

Awards and nominations[edit]

Awards[edit]

Australian Film Institute Television Awards:

Logie Awards:

Nominations[edit]

Australian Film Institute Television Awards:

  • Best Actress in a Supporting or Guest Role in a Television Drama or Comedy – Jacinta Stapleton (2004)[2]
  • Best Direction in Television – Grant Brown (2004)[2]
  • Best Screenplay in Television – Matt Ford (2004)[2]
  • Best Television Drama Series (2003)[3]
  • Best Actor in a Guest Role in a Television Drama Series – Travis McMahon for the episode "Rich Man's World" (2001)[4]
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Guest Role in a Television Drama Series – Rhondda Findleton for the episode "Fool To Want You" (2001)[4]
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Guest Role in a Television Drama Series – Aaron Blabey for the episode "Second Chance" (2000)[5]
  • Best Performance by an Actor in a Guest Role in a Television Drama Series – Daniel Daperis for the episode "Forced Perspective" (2000)[5]
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Television Drama Series – Anita Hegh (2000)[5]

Logie Awards:

  • Most Outstanding Drama Series (2005)
  • Most Popular New Female Talent – Katrina Milosevic (2004)
  • Most Popular New Male Talent – Daniel Frederiksen (2004)
  • Most Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series – Gary Sweet (2004)
  • Most Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series – Kate Kendall (2004)
  • Most Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series – Gary Sweet (2003)
  • Most Outstanding Drama Series (2001)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Television categories 1986–2009". AFI Award Winners. Australian Film Institute. 2009. Retrieved 2010-11-12. 
  2. ^ a b c T Zuk (1998–2010). "2004 Australian Film Institute Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  3. ^ T Zuk (1998–2010). "2003 Australian Film Institute Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  4. ^ a b T Zuk (1998–2010). "2001 Australian Film Institute Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  5. ^ a b c T Zuk (1998–2010). "2000 Australian Film Institute Awards". Australian Television Information Archive. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 

External links[edit]