Stoating

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Stoating, sometimes written stoting or stotting,[1] is a type of stitching made to join two pieces of woven material, with raw edges placed together, such that the resulting stitches are not visible from the right side of the cloth. Stoating is accomplished by passing the needle only halfway through the pieces of material to be stoated, using a very fine needle and thread, such as silk,[2] or even hair.[3] Stitches would be drawn from side to side across the opening to be sewn closed, in a pattern resembling a zig-zag or the rungs of a ladder.[2] Stoating may be used on heavier fabrics, such as felt and some types of tweed,[4] or fabrics that will not fray easily.[5] Stoating would also be used in place of seaming on heavy furs.[6] When completed, the join should lie flat and not be visible from the right side of the fabric.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Boy's Book of Trades and the Tools Used in Them. London: Routledge. 1866. pp. 218–220. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via HathiTrust.  open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ a b Waisman, Abraham (1953). Clever Weave: The Modern method of French Reweaving. Chicago: CleverWeave Publishers. pp. 36–38. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via HathiTrust.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ The New Dressmaker (3rd ed.). New York: Butterick Publishing Co. 1921. p. 148. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via HathiTrust.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Ryan, Mildred Graves (1954). Thrift with a Needle: The Complete Book of Mending. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. p. 66. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via HathiTrust.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ Blackmore, Betsy L. (1906). The A-B-C of Needlework. London: Ralph, Holland & Co. pp. 119–120. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via Google Books.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ Rathvon, S. S. (June 1902). "Technical Terms of Tailoring". The American Tailor and Cutter. New York: Jno. J. Mitchell Co. 23 (12): 343. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via Google Books.  open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ Scott, Clarice L. (October 1946). Make-Overs from Leather, Fur and Felt. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Agriculture. p. 5. Retrieved February 6, 2016 – via Google Books.  open access publication – free to read