Stone-coated metal roofing

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A stone coated metal roof is made from steel or some other metal; the metal is then coated with stone chips and attached to the steel with an acrylic film. The goal is a more durable roof that still retains the aesthetic advantages of a more traditional roofing material[1]


History[edit]

Stone coated metal roofing was refined during and after World War II in the United Kingdom, when the government requested materials that would protect corrugated steel roofs from the harsh climate. A coating of bitumen and subsequent covering by sand, stone or other materials proved effective at protecting the metal roofs and serving as camouflage against potential attack.[2]

In 1954, L.J. Fisher, an industrialist from New Zealand, secured the rights to produce stone-coated metal roofing outside of Great Britain. The company he founded, AHI Roofing, operates the largest metal roofing factory in the world, and has continued to make changes to the metal roofing product.[3]

Stone coated metal roofing manufacturing process was adapted by multiple companies, principle of which are "Roser Roofing Systems".  Decra, and Gerrard with production facilities spanning from South Korea to New Zealand. When compared to asphalt shingles and concrete roofing products, which can weigh 350 to 1100 pounds per square, the stone coated metal roof, at only 150 pounds per square, effectively reduces the overhead weight on the house structure. This provides for a much safer building during an earthquake, fire or a hurricane.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Metal Roofing Association. "Frequently Asked Questions". Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  2. ^ Hill, Kate (August 2002). "Excerpt from "The History of Metal Tiles"" (PDF). Scope. New Zealand Metal Roofing Manufacturers. Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ Gibson, Anne (November 12, 2007). "Fletcher closes in on $20m Hungary deal". NZ Herald News. Retrieved July 11, 2011.