Stone Bridge (Rhode Island)

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Stone Bridge
Stone Bridge
The western stub of the 1907 Stone Bridge in 2005, as seen from the Portsmouth side. It is now used as a fishing pier.
Coordinates 41°37′33″N 71°13′02″W / 41.62573°N 71.21716°W / 41.62573; -71.21716Coordinates: 41°37′33″N 71°13′02″W / 41.62573°N 71.21716°W / 41.62573; -71.21716
Carries Route 138
Crosses Sakonnet River
Locale between Portsmouth and Tiverton, Rhode Island
Characteristics
Design steel
History
Opened 1907
Closed 1956
Stone Bridge (Rhode Island) is located in Rhode Island
Stone Bridge (Rhode Island)

The Stone Bridge was a bridge built in 1907 in Rhode Island that carried RI 138 over the Sakonnet River between Portsmouth and Tiverton. It was severely damaged by Hurricane Carol in 1954, and replaced in 1956 by the Sakonnet River Bridge, which was under construction at the time of the hurricane, located 0.8 mi (1.3 km) to the north. The span was closed to marine traffic after the hurricane.[1] After inspection, it was decided to close the bridge to bus and truck traffic on January 13, 1955.[2] It was then closed to all vehicles on January 18, 1955.[2] Pedestrians were allowed to walk across.[3] Repairs were made and the bridge reopened to all traffic on March 3, 1955.[4] It remained in service until the opening of the Sakonnet River Bridge in 1956.

History[edit]

According to the Federal Writer's Project in 1977:

A ferry was established in 1640 at this point, probably the first regular ferry to be commissioned in Rhode Island. It was locally referred to as Howland's Ferry, but was also called Pocasset Ferry, Sanford's Ferry and Wanton's Ferry. It was run by the Howland family from about 1703 to 1776. The ferry-right was sold to the Rhode Island Bridge Company in 1794, and a wooden bridge was built and opened the next year, though it was not steadily in use until 1810. The present steel bridge was constructed by the State in 1907."[5]

During the Battle of Rhode Island in the American Revolution, American troops retreated from the British near this spot. The Stone Bridge approaches are still visible from either side as of 2008. The approaches are on Park Avenue in Portsmouth and at a park in Tiverton off Main Road (RI 77).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bus and Truck Traffic Is Barred From Stone Bridge, Tiverton". Fall River Herald News. Fall River, Massachusetts: Edward J. Delaney. January 13, 1955. p. 1. 
  2. ^ a b "Stone Bridge To Close Tuesday; Repairs Are Ordered". Fall River Herald News. Fall River, Massachusetts: Edward J. Delaney. January 14, 1955. p. 1. 
  3. ^ "Tiverton Request Would Cut Walking Distance on Span". Fall River Herald News. Fall River, Massachusetts: Edward J. Delaney. January 20, 1955. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Trucks Crossing Stone Bridge". Fall River Herald News. Fall River, Massachusetts: Edward J. Delaney. March 4, 1955. p. 1. 
  5. ^ Rhode Island: A Guide to the Smallest State, Federal Writers' Project (US History Publishers, 1977) pg. 416 [1]

External links[edit]