Stonewall County, Texas

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Stonewall County, Texas
Stonewall county courthouse.JPG
Stonewall County Courthouse in Aspermont
Map of Texas highlighting Stonewall County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1888
Named for Stonewall Jackson
Seat Aspermont
Largest town Aspermont
Area
 • Total 920 sq mi (2,383 km2)
 • Land 916 sq mi (2,372 km2)
 • Water 3.9 sq mi (10 km2), 0.4%
Population
 • (2010) 1,490
 • Density 1.6/sq mi (0.6/km2)
Congressional district 19th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5

Stonewall County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 1,490.[1] Its county seat is Aspermont.[2] The county was created in 1876 and organized in 1888.[3] It is named for Stonewall Jackson, a general of the Confederate States Army.

Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Stonewall County in the Texas House of Representatives.[4]

History[edit]

Stonewall County was formed in 1876 from portions of Bexar County and Young County. It was named after Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, a general of the Confederate Army.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 920 square miles (2,400 km2), of which 916 square miles (2,370 km2) is land and 3.9 square miles (10 km2) (0.4%) is covered by water.[5]

Geographic features[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880104
18901,024884.6%
19002,183113.2%
19105,320143.7%
19204,086−23.2%
19305,66738.7%
19405,589−1.4%
19503,679−34.2%
19603,017−18.0%
19702,397−20.6%
19802,4060.4%
19902,013−16.3%
20001,693−15.9%
20101,490−12.0%
Est. 20161,426[9]−4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1850–2010[11] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[12] of 2010, 1,490 people, 642 households, and 426 families resided in the county. The population density was 2.0 people per square mile. The 928 housing units averaged 1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 87.7% White, 2.6% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 6.3% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. About 14.0% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 642 households, 24% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were not families; 15.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the county, the population was distributed as 22.80% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 22.60% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 24.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,935, and for a family was $35,571. Males had a median income of $27,083 versus $15,000 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,094. About 14.80% of families and 19.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.50% of those under age 18 and 14.50% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Town[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost Town[edit]

Politics[edit]

Whereas the counties to its north in the Panhandle proper became overwhelmingly Republican at a Presidential level with Dwight D. Eisenhower in the 1950s, Stonewall County continued to favour the Democratic Party for another four decades, even being narrowly won by Walter Mondale in 1984 when he came within 3,819 votes of losing all fifty states. During the twentieth century the only Republican to carry Stonewall County was Richard Nixon in 1972 – it was one of the few Baptist Bible Belt counties that stayed loyal to the anti-Prohibition Catholic Al Smith in 1928 when Texas voted Republican for the first time in its history.

Like the rest of the Bible Belt, due to opposition to the Democratic Party’s liberal positions on social issues Stonewall County has trended powerfully Republican[13] and in the last five elections the Republican nominee has won more than 62 percent of the vote – more than Nixon won in his 3,000-plus-county landslide in 1972.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 79.2% 555 19.3% 135 1.6% 11
2012 75.1% 507 23.7% 160 1.2% 8
2008 71.3% 524 28.0% 206 0.7% 5
2004 66.4% 499 33.2% 250 0.4% 3
2000 62.1% 496 36.8% 294 1.1% 9
1996 35.2% 323 53.1% 487 11.7% 107
1992 21.5% 242 49.9% 561 28.6% 322
1988 36.7% 421 63.1% 724 0.2% 2
1984 48.2% 599 51.7% 643 0.2% 2
1980 40.0% 488 59.0% 719 1.0% 12
1976 23.6% 252 75.9% 812 0.6% 6
1972 61.6% 662 36.7% 394 1.8% 19
1968 19.2% 213 57.2% 635 23.6% 262
1964 18.3% 219 81.6% 978 0.2% 2
1960 26.1% 306 73.7% 864 0.3% 3
1956 26.9% 306 72.9% 829 0.3% 3
1952 27.6% 319 72.3% 836 0.2% 2
1948 6.1% 65 91.0% 968 2.9% 31
1944 8.2% 89 83.5% 902 8.2% 89
1940 11.8% 156 88.3% 1,172
1936 5.6% 59 94.3% 1,001 0.1% 1
1932 4.9% 50 95.1% 976
1928 46.9% 442 53.1% 500
1924 16.0% 171 72.9% 778 11.1% 118
1920 24.5% 134 65.1% 356 10.4% 57
1916 3.3% 21 78.2% 502 18.5% 119
1912 1.5% 7 71.2% 341 27.4% 131

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 26, 2015. 
  4. ^ "State Rep. Springer announces district tour July 30". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Stonewall County High Point Trip Report". Retrieved 2008-08-14. 
  7. ^ "Prominence Ladder from Double Mountains". Retrieved 2008-08-14. 
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Brazos River
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ Cohn, Nate; ‘Demographic Shift: Southern Whites’ Loyalty to G.O.P. Nearing That of Blacks to Democrats’, New York Times, April 24, 2014
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 11 April 2018. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°11′N 100°15′W / 33.18°N 100.25°W / 33.18; -100.25