Stop Child Trafficking Now

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Stop Child Trafficking Now
TypeIGO
PurposeTo combat the trafficking of children
Official language
English
Key people
Lynette Lewis
Websitewww.sctnow.org

Stop Child Trafficking Now (also called SCTNow) was a not-for-profit organization founded by Lynette Lewis, an author and public speaker.[1] This nonprofit organization[2] engaged in advocacy work in an attempt to bring an end to the trafficking of children.[3] SCTNow targeted the demand for human trafficking, focusing on pedophiles, child abductions and child pornography.[4] The group sought to have those who sexually abuse children prosecuted and convicted.[5]

The organization organized annual walks to raise funds and awareness about the issue. In 2009, organizers claimed to have organized walks in 41 cities naitonwide and hoped to raise over a million dollars.[6][dead link][7] The first walk took place in September 2011 in Augusta, Georgia, United States.[8][not in citation given] SCTNow events have been held in more than 35 cities in the United States.[9][not in citation given] The group organized a protest at Phillips Square, Montreal, Quebec, Canada in September 2009.[10]

A focus of Stop Child Trafficking Now's fundraising campaigns was tapping donors to support an effort said to led by Clark Stuart, a former U.S. Navy SEAL described as the group's "operations president," for what Stuart described as an elite team made up of former American law enforcement officers and former U.S. military who would hunt down Americans who trafficked children for sex in foreign countries. According to individuals approached by Stuart to make donations, the culprits would be handed over to government authorities for prosecution abroad or in the U.S.[11][not in citation given] Tulsa, Oklahoma, Police Chief Chuck Jordan agreed to accept the group's national database of information about child traffickers and child predators for its possible value in assessing child sex trafficking.[12][not in citation given]

The organization ceased to exist after questions were raised about fundraising improprieties.[13][not in citation given]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stephanie G. Henderson (2012). Unforgettable: God's Relentless Heart for His Daughters. CrossBooks Publishing. p. ix. ISBN 978-1462721269.
  2. ^ "Facebook Anti-Trafficking Partner to Host 33 Walk/Run to 'Stop Child Trafficking Now'". The Salem News. September 8, 2011. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ Michael Futch (May 30, 2013). "Bradley Lockhart, Shaniya Davis' father, reflects on Mario McNeill trial and verdict". The Fayetteville Observer. Archived from the original on June 29, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  4. ^ Judy Pochel (September 1, 2011). "Montgomery woman sponsors run to fight child trafficking". The Beacon-News. Archived from the original on October 8, 2011. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  5. ^ Natalie Brand (September 16, 2011). "Survivor of sex trafficking covers painful past with tattoo". KPTV. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  6. ^ Salonga, Robert. "Bay Area march against child trafficking set for Saturday". Oakland Tribune. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  7. ^ Tara Herrschaft (September 25, 2009). "Stop Child Trafficking Now Walk". WCTV. Archived from the original on June 10, 2015. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  8. ^ Kelly Jasper (August 26, 2011). "Race supports anti-child trafficking group". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  9. ^ Bianca Fortis (September 27, 2009). "Students walk to raise awareness of child trafficking". Central Florida Future. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  10. ^ "Child trafficking a domestic problem: MP". CTV News. September 27, 2009. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  11. ^ Cabrera, Yvette (27 September 2009). "Retired terror hunters turn sights to child sex slavery". Orange Country Register. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  12. ^ Marshall, Nicole (2 December 2010). "Human trafficking in area to be assessed". McClatchy. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  13. ^ Moriki, Darin (16 December 2016). "EX-CHIEF'S HUSBAND BASHES INVESTIGATION: SAYS HE AND HIS WIFE HAVE NOT DONE ANYTHING WRONG". East Bay Times. Retrieved 18 January 2018.