Stormy Monday Blues

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For the T-Bone Walker song "Stormy Monday", see Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday Is Just as Bad).
"Stormy Monday Blues"
Stormy Monday Blues single cover.jpg
Single by Earl Hines
B-side "Second Balcony Jump"
Released 1942 (1942)
Format 10-inch 78 rpm record
Recorded March 19, 1942
Genre Jazz
Length 3:11
Label Bluebird (no. 11567)
Writer(s) Earl Hines, Billy Eckstine, Bob Crowder

"Stormy Monday Blues" is a jazz song first recorded in 1942 by Earl Hines and His Orchestra with Billy Eckstine on vocals. The song was a hit, reaching number one in Billboard magazine's "Harlem Hit Parade",[1] making it Hines' only appearance in the charts.

"Stormy Monday Blues" is performed in the style of a slow blues that "starts with Hines' piano and a walking bass for the introduction".[2] Billy Eckstine then enters with the vocal:

It's gone and started rainin', I'm as lonesome as a man can be
It's gone and started rainin', I'm as lonesome as a man can be
'Cause every time it rains, I realize what you mean to me

The lyrics "stormy" or "Monday" do not appear in the song. A trumpet solo by Maurice "Shorty" McConnell[3] with big band backing is featured in the second half of the song.[2]

The song has sometimes been confused with T-Bone Walker's 1947 song "Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday Is Just as Bad)", which is frequently shortened to "Stormy Monday" or "Stormy Monday Blues".[4] When Eckstine later recorded "Stormy Monday Blues" in 1959 with Count Basie for their Basie/Eckstine Incorporated album, the song was credited to T-Bone Walker, even though Eckstine is a cowriter of the original.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1988). Top R&B Singles 1942–1988. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research. p. 191. ISBN 0-89820-068-7. 
  2. ^ a b Billboard (August 8, 1942). "Earl Hines – record review". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 24 (32): 68. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  3. ^ Yanow, Scott (2001). Trumpet Kings: The Players Who Shaped the Sound of Jazz Trumpet. Backbeat Books. p. 250. ISBN 978-0-87930-640-3. 
  4. ^ Herzhaft, Gerard (1992). "Stormy Monday Blues". Encyclopedia of the Blues. Fayetteville, Arkansas: University of Arkansas Press. p. 472. ISBN 1-55728-252-8. 
  5. ^ Nastos, Michael G. "Basie and Eckstine, Inc. – album review". AllMusic. Retrieved September 14, 2010. 
Preceded by
"Trav'lin' Light"
by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra with vocal by Lady Day and trombone by Skip Layton
The Billboard Harlem Hit Parade number-one single
(Earl Hines and His Orchestra version)

November 14, 1942 (one week)
Succeeded by
"Trav'lin' Light"
by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra with vocal by Lady Day and trombone by Skip Layton