Stranger Things (season 3)

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Stranger Things (season 3)
ST3LambertPoster.png
Promotional poster
Starring
Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes8
Release
Original networkNetflix
Original releaseJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Season chronology
← Previous
Season 2
List of Stranger Things episodes

The third season of the American science fiction-horror web television series Stranger Things, titled Stranger Things 3, was released worldwide on Netflix's web streaming service on July 4, 2019. The series is set in summer, 1985. The series was created by the Duffer Brothers, who are also executive producers along with Shawn Levy, Dan Cohen and Iain Paterson.

The third season stars Winona Ryder, David Harbour, Finn Wolfhard, Millie Bobby Brown, Gaten Matarazzo, Caleb McLaughlin, Noah Schnapp, Sadie Sink, Natalia Dyer, Charlie Heaton, Joe Keery, Dacre Montgomery, Maya Hawke, Priah Ferguson, and Cara Buono. Cary Elwes, Jake Busey, and Francesca Reale appear in recurring roles.[1][2][3]

Premise[edit]

In the summer of 1985 in Hawkins, the new Starcourt Mall has become the focal point of the town, driving other stores out of business. Sheriff Jim Hopper is conflicted over Eleven and Mike's budding relationship, while Joyce considers moving out of Hawkins for better prospects, leaving the state of the children's friendships and her own relationship with Hopper in the air. However, strange power fluctuations trigger Will's awareness of something otherworldly, and Eleven and Max sense something is off about the town's residents, and despite having closed the portal to the Upside Down, fears that they are all in danger from it still.

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

Recurring[edit]

Notable guests[edit]

Episodes[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal release date
181"Chapter One: Suzie, Do You Copy?"The Duffer BrothersThe Duffer BrothersJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
On June 28, 1984, Soviet generals give a group of scientists a year to develop technology to force open a portal to the Upside Down. A year later, in the middle of the summer of 1985 in Hawkins, the new Starcourt Mall has caused other town shops to close down, angering townspeople. Mike and Eleven have developed a romantic relationship and Hopper talks to Joyce seeking advice on how to split the two apart. She suggests he write a "heart to heart" speech for Eleven. Dustin comes back from summer science camp, and encourages Mike, Will, Lucas, Eleven, and Max to help set up a make-shift radio so he can contact Suzie, a girl he met at camp. One night, the power goes out across Hawkins, which shakes Will, and at a nearby abandoned steel mill, a strange entity appears. Nancy has started a job at the local paper, under editor Tom Holloway and co-worker Bruce. She secures a tip about a strange event. Dustin records a strange transmission coming through his transmitter of a man speaking Russian. Billy later drives by the mill, hits something and is dragged inside.
192"Chapter Two: The Mall Rats"The Duffer BrothersThe Duffer BrothersJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Billy is dragged into the Upside Down, where he encounters his doppelganger. Instead of having a heart to heart, Hopper tries to distance Mike from Eleven. Later, Eleven and Max run into Mike, Will and Lucas at the mall, where Eleven breaks up with Mike. Nancy and Jonathan follow up on her lead and find Mrs. Driscoll had caught a rat that was eating her new fertilizer. When they're not looking, the rat implodes into an amorphous organic mass and escapes. Hopper asks Joyce on a date, but she gets caught up in discovering why all the magnets lost their magnetism, and misses the dinner. Dustin, with the help of Steve and his co-worker Robin, translate the Russian sentence. Steve discovers that the song Daisy Bell, heard in the background of the Russian message is identical to the music played from a toy horse in the mall, suggesting the message originated locally rather than from Russia. Meanwhile, Billy struggles with nightmares during lifeguard duty and guided by a strange voice connected to his doppelganger he saw in the Upside Down, he abducts fellow lifeguard Heather Holloway and takes her to the mill to be possessed by the entity there.
203"Chapter Three: The Case of the Missing Lifeguard"Shawn LevyWilliam BridgesJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Max encourages Eleven to use her powers to "spy" on Mike. Later, when spying on Billy, he senses her presence and Eleven sees Billy subduing Heather. Max and Eleven try to track down Billy, but fail to find him and Heather at work. Nancy finds out more about the strange rat behavior, but she is made fun of by the men at the paper. Attempting to find the rat from Mrs. Driscoll, Nancy and Jonathan find she is feral herself. Will has a falling out with Lucas and Mike following a D&D game. Robin happens across the clues to decode the message, indicating something will happen at the mall that night. That night, Dustin, Steve, and Robin spy on armed Russian men covering a shipment to the mall. While Hopper is angry at Joyce for missing their date, aware she is considering moving out of Hawkins, Joyce reiterates what Clarke told her, and look for signs of such a device at the abandoned Hawkins Lab where Hopper is attacked. Eleven and Max find Billy and Heather apparently okay with Tom and his wife. Billy sneers as they leave, which Will senses. Billy and Heather then knock out her parents.
214"Chapter Four: The Sauna Test"Shawn LevyKate TrefeyJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Billy and Heather take her parents to the mill, where they are also possessed. Later, Nancy and Jonathan are fired by Tom. Still curious, Nancy goes to visit Mrs. Driscoll at the hospital. Eleven and Max reunite with Mike, Will, and Lucas after hearing about Will's latest sensing. The group determine that the Mind Flayer still resides in the real world, having possessed Billy. That night, the five trap Billy in the pool's sauna, confirming he is possessed. Billy gains superhuman strength and breaks free, at the same time Nancy witnesses Mrs. Driscoll similarly transform. Hopper recalls seeing the Russian man that attacked him, Grigori, previously meeting with Mayor Kline. Hopper and Joyce force Kline to reveal that Grigori works for the owners of Starcourt, who have bought up additional abandoned properties around Hawkins. Kline alerts Grigori as Hopper and Joyce search those locations. At Starcourt, Dustin, Steve, and Robin enlist Erica to break into the storeroom, finding too late is an elevator as it takes them deep below the mall. Billy regroups with Heather at the mill, where dozens of other Hawkins citizens have been possessed.
225"Chapter Five: The Flayed"Uta BriesewitzPaul DichterJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Hopper and Joyce discover one of the abandoned properties has a hidden laboratory. They get into a fight with Grigori and escape with Dr. Alexei, a Russian man who helped build the gate to Upside Down. Alexei only speaks Russian, so Hopper decides to go to Murray who can help translate. Grigori tries to follow and loses the trail. Dustin, Steve, Robin, and Erica hide from Russian men unloading the boxes from the elevator, and follow them out after they leave, discovering a massive Russian base under Starcourt. Attempting to find a communications room, the four discover a large testing area where scientists are trying to open the portal to the Upside Down. Nancy and Jonathan meet with Will and the others, and confirm their experiences from the previous night. They decide to let Mrs. Driscoll lead them to where Billy is. While the other children wait downstairs, Nancy and Jonathan find Mrs. Driscoll gone and an enraged Tom and Bruce waiting for them. Nancy and Jonathan fight the two and upon killing them, their bodies dissolve into organic masses which join together, forming a beast.
236"Chapter Six: E Pluribus Unum"Uta BriesewitzCurtis GwinnJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
As the Mind Flayer attacks Nancy and Jonathan in the hospital, Will senses its presence, and Eleven arrives in time to overpower it; it slinks off into the sewers. In the Russian base under Starcourt, Steve and Robin are captured, drugged, and interrogated, but Dustin and Erica arrive to rescue them. With Murray's translation, Hopper and Joyce learn from Alexei of the Russian efforts to build gate machines to access the Upside Down, including one under Starcourt; Hopper calls Dr. Owens to warn the government. Grigori corners Klein at the Independence Day fair, demanding he step up efforts to find Hopper's group. To find the Mind Flayer, Eleven uses the same method of accessing Billy's memories as she had used with her mother. After seeing his troubled childhood, she finds the eye of the storm at the steel mill. As she pulls out of his mind, Billy grabs her, and the Mind Flayer senses her location, in Hopper's cabin. Across town, those possessed by the Mind Flayer converge on the mill, and congeal into a larger beast.
247"Chapter Seven: The Bite"The Duffer BrothersThe Duffer BrothersJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Eleven and the others determine the Mind Flayer is coming for her since she was the one who previously closed the gate. Will senses the Mind Flayer approaching and it attacks them before they flee. Dustin and Erica drag a drugged Steve and Robin to the movie theater in Starcourt. Eleven's group break into a hardware store to help treat her wounds and gather more supplies. Suddenly, Dustin contacts them over walkie-talkie to explain their situation before he loses battery power. Eleven uses her powers to check on Dustin, so the group takes off for the mall. Steve admits that he has feelings for Robin, but she comes out to him as a lesbian. Hopper's group make their way to the fairgrounds in Hawkins to find the children where they are spotted by Klein, who alerts the Russians. Alexei is fatally shot by Grigori in front of Murray. Murray, Hopper, and Joyce evade several Soviet agents and learn the agents are looking for the children at the mall. At the mall, Eleven's group arrives in time to stop the Russians from shooting Dustin's group. Eleven collapses in front of the children, her wound pulsing with a strange growth.
258"Chapter Eight: The Battle of Starcourt"The Duffer BrothersThe Duffer BrothersJuly 4, 2019 (2019-07-04)
Eleven rids the growth herself as Hopper's group arrives. Plans are made to take Eleven to safety, while Hopper, Joyce and Murray will shut off the machine, with Dustin and Erica navigating them from his radio tower. Dustin enlists Suzie's help for a necessary code. Billy and the Mind Flayer trap Eleven at the mall. Billy seizes Eleven for the Mind Flayer while the others distract it with fireworks. Eleven is able to awaken Billy's mind from his memories, and Billy sacrifices himself to protect Eleven. Hopper fights with Grigori in the gate room as Joyce prepares to trigger the shutdown. Hopper throws Grigori into the machine, causing it to go haywire and block his exit. Hopper nods at Joyce to trigger the shutdown, seemingly disintegrating everyone in the gate room, and stopping the Mind Flayer. As Dr. Owens arrives with military forces, Eleven sees from Joyce's expression that Hopper is gone. Three months later, Joyce's family and a powerless Eleven prepare to move out of Hawkins. Joyce gives Hopper's written speech to Eleven. In Kamchatka, Russian guards are instructed to feed a prisoner, but "not the American", to a captive Demogorgon.

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Levy noted in November 2016 that he and the Duffer Brothers had already begun planning a potential third season, saying, "We are not gonna be caught off guard and we don't wanna be making stuff up like the day before we have to write it and make it, so we are definitely optimistic and we have started thinking ahead."[21] The Duffer Brothers anticipate having about four to five seasons to work with, but do want to "have a really finite ending" while the series is still at a height of success, according to Matt, rather than letting it draw out indefinitely.[22] In August 2017, the Duffer Brothers confirmed there would be a third season, with the likelihood of one more season following that, with Ross saying, "We're thinking it will be a four-season thing and then out".[23] However, executive producer Shawn Levy later suggested that either four or five total seasons were possibilities, claiming that "the truth is we're definitely going four seasons and there's very much the possibility of a fifth. Beyond that, it becomes I think very unlikely."[24] Matt Duffer later commented that no official decision has been made, claiming that "It's hard, like four seems short, five seems long. So I don't know what to do."[25] In December 2017, Netflix officially confirmed that they have green lit the third season,[26] consisting of eight episodes. Levy also confirmed that a fourth season was "definitely happening" and that there was potential for a fifth season.[27] A year later, the episode titles for season three were revealed, along with confirming the season would be named Stranger Things 3, similar to the second season.[28]

Writing[edit]

Writing for the third season began before the second season's premiere, with a good portion being written in twelve-to-fourteen-hour bouts by the series' creators.[29] It was reported that Netflix wanted both the third and fourth seasons to be written simultaneously as to facilitate a back-to-back production schedule, for the actors were aging faster than their on-screen characters, but both the Duffer Brothers and producer Shawn Levy optioned to focus only on the third season to ensure it was better-developed and more fleshed out.[30]

In terms of narrative, Levy said the season would be less about Will, saying, "We're not going to put Will through hell for a third season in a row. He'll be dealing with stuff, but he won't be at rock bottom... We're [going to be] dealing with forces of evil that are new."[31] David Harbour has said that the third season also draws heavily from the film Fletch.[32] Both Levy and Natalia Dyer echo sentiments that this season's events will be more adult-oriented, with Dyer calling the season's narrative "...Bigger, darker, [and] scarier."[33]

Casting[edit]

The third season sees Ryder, Harbour, Wolfhard, Brown, Matarazzo, McLaughlin, Schnapp, Sink, Dyer, Heaton, Buono, Keery and Montgomery return.[34] In March 2018, it was announced that Priah Ferguson's character had been promoted to a recurring role, and that Maya Hawke has been cast as Robin, a new lead who's been described as an "alternative girl."[1] Hawke's character was later revealed to be Steve's co-worker at the Scoops Ahoy ice cream parlor in the newly-built Starcourt Mall.[35] Cary Elwes and Jake Busey's castings were announced in April 2018; Elwes was cast as Mayor Kline, a " classic ’80s politician – more concerned with his own image than with the people of the small town he governs," and Busey as Bruce, a shifty reporter who works at The Hawkins Post.[2] Francesca Reale was cast as Heather, a popular lifeguard at the community pool.[3] As of September 2018, casting had still not been completed for the season, which at that point had been shooting for five months and was less than two months from completion. Carmen Cuba, the show's casting director, attributed the slower-than-usual casting process to the heightened secrecy of the plot paired with certain roles' shifting characterizations and importance.[36]

For the third season, it was reported that several of the cast members would be receiving pay raises. Ryder and Harbour were receiving an increase to $350,000 an episode from $150,000 and $80,000 respectively; Wolfhard, Matarazzo, McLaughlin, and Schnapp were receiving a pay increase to $200,000 an episode and possibly around $250,000, a significant increase from the reported $20,000 they made in season one (later increased by $60,000); and Dyer, Heaton, and Keery would be receiving approximately $150,000 an episode. Brown's pay was not disclosed, but was estimated to be a bigger raise than her young counterparts. Some sources suggest she is at least making $250,000 and may be getting possibly between $300,000 and $350,000 per episode.[37][38][39]

Filming[edit]

Gwinnett Place Mall stood in for the fictional "Starcourt Mall" during third-season filming

Filming for the third season officially began on May 24, 2018.[39] Jackson, Georgia remained as primary filming area for scenes in Hawkins' downtown area.[40] The South Bend Pool in Atlanta served as the Hawkins community pool.[40] The major setpiece of the season, Starcourt Mall, was filmed at a re-dressed Gwinnett Place Mall near Duluth, Georgia.[41] The production team had searched around Georgia for a dead mall, one either closed or with significantly reduced vacancy, for film, and found Gwinnett was nearly perfect, having been built in 1984 and thus having the staples of construction from malls in that period. They secured a portion of the mall that had been vacant for some time, redressing the storefronts and food court to feature brands of the 80s, paying attention to which stores likely had made it to Indiana by 1985. Outside "Scoops Ahoy!", a fictional store, they had to make one exception for "Glamour Shots", which was a real chain of photo studios but did not come to malls until after 1985; as a scene of Eleven and Max enjoying a photo shoot was a necessary plot element, the design team created a similar photo studio but with a new fictitious name. Not only did they recreate the facade of each of the storefronts, but they worked to fully stock them as well, in anticipation of any last-minute filming ideas the Duffers may have had.[42]

On September 27 Millie Bobby Brown was spotted filming an emotional scene with stunt doubles and a child dressed in a baseball uniform at a beach in Malibu, California.[43] On October 4, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin, Gaten Matarazzo, Sadie Sink, Noah Schnapp and Natalia Dyer were all spotted filming in Palmetto, Georgia without Brown.[44] The third season concluded filming on November 12, 2018.[45] Regarding the lengthy hiatus between the second and third seasons, Netflix programming executive Cindy Holland noted "[the Duffer Brothers and Shawn Levy] understand the stakes are high. They want to deliver something bigger and better than last year. I think it's going to be a fantastic season. It will be worth the wait."[46]

Music[edit]

The original soundtrack album for the third season, titled Stranger Things 3, was released digitally on June 28, 2019, via Lakeshore and Invada Records.[47][48] Like the previous two seasons, the soundtrack was composed by Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein of the electronic band Survive.[47][48] The album will be also released on physical formats such as CD, vinyl, and cassette.[47][48]

In addition to Dixon and Stein's original soundtrack, the season features several songs selected from the 1980s and earlier eras.[49] Legacy Recordings released a 16-track compliantion of these songs on July 5, 2019.

Of note was the use of "The NeverEnding Story", the theme to the 1984 film of the same name, which is used in the final episode when Suzie refuses to provide the critical code until Dustin sings it to her. The Duffers had wanted to introduce Suzie into the show's narrative in some dramatic fashion while giving Matarazzo, who has sung on Broadway before, a chance to show off his own vocals. Initially, they were planning to use "The Ent and the Entwife" song from The Lord of the Rings, but aware that Amazon Studios were developing their own Lord of the Rings series, decided to change direction. The Duffers credit writer Curtis Gwinn for using "The NeverEnding Story" as the replacement.[50] Both Matarazzo and Gabriella Pizzolo, the actress playing Suzie and also a seasoned singer on Broadway, were on nearby sets when they sung the song together and were able to harmonize the song as well without the backing music.[51] As their characters were not meant to be in that much synchronization due to being in two different places, the use of the song's backing track and some autotuning was used to blend their singing to their respective settings and the tone of the soundtrack.[52] According to the cast and to composers Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein, the song became an earworm for many of the cast on the day that scene was filmed.[51] Later in the episode, Lucas and Max, played by Caleb McLaughlin and Sadie Sink, sing the song in duet back to Dustin to mock him; both McLaughlin and Sink also have had experience in Broadway musicals.[51] As a result of its appearance in the series, "The NeverEnding Story" drew an 800% increase in viewership and streaming requests on YouTube and Spotify over the days after initial broadcast, putting Limahl, the song's artist, briefly back in the spotlight.[53]

Marketing[edit]

Promotion for the third season began with the first day of production, when Netflix released a video featuring the cast as they met for the season's first table read.[54] On July 16, 2018, the first teaser trailer for the season was released. The teaser, which is the first to feature footage shot for the new season, is a "commercial" for the newly-built Starcourt Mall, one of the main settings for the season's events.[55][56][57] The "commercial" lists some of the stores found in the mall as well as restaurants in the "state-of-the-art" food court, and closes with Steve (Joe Keery) and Robin (Maya Hawke) saying "Ahoy!" during a short plug for one of the food court's establishments, an ice cream parlor called Scoops Ahoy.[55][56][57] On December 9, 2018, during an appearance at the 2018 Comic Con Experience at the São Paulo Expo in São Paulo, Brazil, Noah Schnapp, Sadie Sink, and Caleb McLaughlin presented a new teaser which revealed the titles of the eight episodes in the new season.[58] Hours later, the teaser was released online across all of the official Stranger Things social media accounts.[59][60] On December 31, pedestrians in New York City's Times Square noticed a video playing on a loop advertising a special announcement "sponsored" by the Starcourt Mall.[61][62] According to the video, the announcement was slated to be aired on the fictional ABC network affiliate WIYZ.[61] At midnight EST, Netflix released a new teaser announcing the release date of the season to be July 4, 2019.[63][61][62] The teaser utilized footage from Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve 1984, specifically the countdown to the New Year. As the countdown commenced, the video slowly turned upside down and became fuzzy, and Mike could be heard calling out for Eleven as the video cut in between different recordings of computers running MS-DOS.[62] The season's first poster, featuring a menacing creature slowly approaching the cast while they're enjoying Independence Day festivities, was released concurrently with the teaser.[63][61][62]

On March 19, 2019, the Stranger Things social media accounts posted a short clip of rats scurrying through a dilapidated industrial area with the caption "It's almost feeding time."[64] This turned out to be a prelude to the release of stills and the first official trailer the next day on March 20.[65][66] The trailer quickly became the most-watched video on Netflix's YouTube channel, amassing 22 million views in the first week following its release.[67] On May 21, the first clip from the season was released in tandem with cast posters.[68][69] The clip, which features Billy flirting with Karen Wheeler at the local pool, includes notable references to the early-1980s comedy films Caddyshack and Fast Times at Ridgemont High.[68] Netflix released the final trailer on June 20, 2019.[70]

In July 2019, actors Finn Wolfhard and Caleb McLaughlin took part in a Q&A session at the Open'er Festival in Gdynia, Poland. The festival boasted also a replica of the Palace Arcade filled with retro coin-ops – such as Space Invaders, Pac-Man, Donkey Kong and Dig Dug.[71]

Tie-ins[edit]

Netflix revealed they had partnered with around 75 companies to produce tie-in products to promote the third season.[72] For many of these deals, there was no financial exchange between Netflix and the third-parties, with Netflix allowing the third-parties to generate their own marketing buzz for their products while helping to promote Stranger Things.[73] Some of the more notable tie-ins include:

  • Swedish apparel retailer H&M offered a clothing collection that includes pieces worn on-screen by several of the series' actors on May 24, 2019.[72][74] The advertisement campaign for the clothing and accessory lines features Dacre Montgomery (Billy) as a model and revolves around his character's summer job as a lifeguard.[74]
  • The Coca-Cola Company revived their ill-received New Coke soft drink for a limited time production run in the month leading up to the season's release.[72][75] The unpopular soft drink was released around the time frame of the season's setting, and a number of episodes featured the beverage prominently placed within the frame.[72][75] New Coke was made available for purchase at special upside down vending machines in select cities across the United States and through Coca-Cola's web store.[72][75]
  • Ice cream chain Baskin-Robbins started offering Stranger Things-inspired menu items in the months prior to the season's release, and at the launch of the third season, several Baskin-Robbins stores across the United States and Canada[76] were made up into the fictional "Scoops Ahoy!" ice cream parlor in the show for about two weeks.[77]
  • Fast food chain Burger King started serving special themed 'upside down' Whoppers as a reference to the Upside Down an alternative universe in the story of the show, including special edition items sold at 11 special locations in the weeks leading up to the premiere.[78][79] And selling special ketchup packets displaying a nose in reference to the nose bleeding of the character, Eleven. Burger King also promoted their restaurant commercials, cups and boxes in a special 1980s theme as a tie-in with Coca-Cola. The restaurant was also featured in the food court of the Starcourt Mall.[80]
  • In the week leading to Stranger Things 3's release, Microsoft teased "Windows 1.0", the company's first graphic operating system introduced in 1985. Microsoft released this mock version of "Windows 1.0" as an app for Windows 10 on July 8, 2019. The app features a similar interface as the original software, with various Easter eggs to the television series scattered through the app.[81]
  • Netflix partnered with Epic Games to include Stranger Things tie-ins into Fortnite Battle Royale around the premiere of the third season.[82]

Release[edit]

The third season consists of 8 episodes and was released worldwide on July 4, 2019, via Netflix.[63]

Reception[edit]

Audience viewership[edit]

Within four days of its release, Netflix reported that over 40.7 million accounts had seen at least 70% of one episode of the third season, a record viewership for any Netflix program, while 18.2 million had seen the entire season within the time.[83]

Critical reception[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the third season received an approval rating of 89% based on 108 reviews, and an average rating of 8/10. The site's critical consensus states, "Vibrant and charming, Stranger Things transforms itself into a riveting—if familiar—summer ride that basks in its neon-laden nostalgia without losing sight of the rich relationships that make the series so endearing."[84] On Metacritic, the third season has a weighted average score of 72 out of 100, based on 24 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[85]

Writing in the New Statesman, Emily Bootle considered the third season an improvement on the second: "... after a confused and rambling season two, the third season of Stranger Things is a return to strength – where season two had something of an identity crisis, season three has largely brought back what made the show unique in the first place."[86] Hugh Montgomery at BBC.com awarded 5 stars, describing the third season as "an exhilarating example of a franchise hitting new heights that Hollywood would do well to learn from."[87] On the dissenting side, Darren Franich of Entertainment Weekly criticized the third season for looking like a Reagan-era pop culture mixtape.[88] Ed Power of The Telegraph blamed Duffer Brothers for refusing "to stray from the Goonies-meets-Stephen King formula" and recycling their "well-worn bag of retro references to increasingly underwhelming effect", producing the limpest installment of the three.[89] His opinion was echoed by Hank Stuever of The Washington Post, who felt almost heartbroken for "the Duffers working so hard to re-create an elusive vibe" of 1980s with a "mishmash of ingredients: John Carpenter, Steven Spielberg, Stephen King, Freddy Krueger, Rambo, the Terminator, the aliens of LV-426" only to fail to create a fully entertaining show.[90]

Accolades[edit]

As part of the 2019 Teen Choice Awards Stranger Things received a nomination for Choice Summer TV show.[91] Caleb McLaughlin, Finn Wolfhard, Gaten Matarazzo, and Noah Schnapp were all nominated for Choice Summer TV actor for their work on the series while Millie Bobby Brown was nominated for Choice Summer TV actress for her work on the series.[92]

References[edit]

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