Streak-breasted jungle flycatcher

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Streak-breasted jungle flycatcher
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Muscicapidae
Genus: Eumyias
Species: E. additus
Binomial name
Eumyias additus
(Hartert, 1900)
Synonyms
  • Rhinomyias addita
  • Rhinomyias additus

The streak-breasted jungle flycatcher (Eumyias additus), also known as the streaky-breasted jungle-flycatcher or Buru jungle-flycatcher, is a species of bird in the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae. It is endemic to the island of Buru in Indonesia where it originally inhabited tropical forests at elevations between 500 and 1,500 metres.

This species was previously assigned to the genus Rhinomyias but was moved to Eumyias after a 2010 molecular phylogenetic study found that Rhinomyias was polyphyletic.[2][3]

Conservation[edit]

Because of the very limited habitat, logging of the forests and expanding human activities on the island, the species was listed as vulnerable in 1994 by the IUCN. This classification was softened to near threatened in 2000 and 2004. The reasons for this change were the observed adjustment to the human environment, as the birds were found in the areas cleared of the forest, as well as the relatively stable condition of the mountainous forests on Buru.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b BirdLife International (2012). "Rhinomyias additus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Sangster, G.; Alström, P.; Forsmark, E.; Olsson, U. (2010). "Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatcher reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 57 (1): 380–392. PMID 20656044. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2010.07.008. 
  3. ^ Gill, Frank; Donsker, David (eds.). "Chats, Old World flycatchers". World Bird List Version 6.2. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 20 May 2016.