Street names of the City of London

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This is a list of the etymology of street names in the City of London.

A[edit]

B[edit]

  • Back Alley – presumably descriptive
  • Back Passage – presumably descriptive
  • Bakers Hall Court – after the nearby hall of the Worshipful Company of Bakers[31]
  • Ball Court
  • Baltic Street West – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Baltic refers to the Baltic softwood trade[32][33]
  • Barbon Alley - after Nicholas Barbon, 17th-century economist [34]
  • Barley Mow Passage – after a former inn here of this name, possibly by reference to alcohol, or else a corruption of the nearby St Bartholomew's church and hospital[35]
  • Barnard’s Inn – named after Lionel Barnard, owner of a town house (or ‘inn’) here in the mid-15th century[36]
  • Bartholomew Close and Bartholomew Place – after St Bartholomew’s Priory, which stood here and is remembered in the names of the local hospital and two churches[37][38]
  • Bartholomew Lane – after the former St Bartholomew-by-the-Exchange church, demolished in 1840[37][39][40]
  • Bartlett Court, Bartlett Street and Bartletts Passage – after Thomas Bartlett, court printer to Edward VI, who owned property here[41][42]
  • Basinghall Avenue and Basinghall Street – thought to be after land owned here by the people of Basa or Basing (in Old Basing, Hampshire), or possibly after a mansion house of the Bassing (or Basing) family, who were prominent in the City beginning in the 13th century[37][43][44][42]
  • Bassishaw Highwalk – after the Bassishaw ward in which it is located[42]
  • Bastion Highwalk – presumably after the adjacent Roman bastion ruins
  • Bear Alley – thought to be after a former inn of this name[45][46]
  • Beech Gardens and Beech Street – after beech trees which formerly stood here; the name is an old one, recorded as ‘Bechestrete’ in the 13th century[47][48]
  • Beehive Passage – after a former tavern here of this name[48]
  • Bengal Court – presumably after the former British colony of Bengal
  • Bell Court
  • Bell Inn Yard – after a former inn of this name[49][50]
  • Bell Wharf Lane – unknown, possibly after a former tavern of this name; formerly Emperor’s Head Lane, after an inn here[51][50]
  • Ben Jonson Place – after Ben Jonson, 17th-century playwright and poet
  • Bennet’s Hill – after the adjacent St Benet’s church[52]
  • Bevis Marks – corruption of ‘Bury Marks’, after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s; mark is thought to note a boundary here[53][54][55]
  • Billiter Court and Billiter Street – after former ‘belzeter’ (bell foundry) located here[56][57][58]
  • Birchin Lane – unknown, though suggested to come from the Old English ‘beord-ceorfere’ (bear carver i.e. a barbers); it has had several variation on this name in the past, including Berchervere, Berchenes and Birchen[56][55][59]
  • Bishop’s Court
  • Bishopsgate, Bishopsgate Arcade and Bishopsgate Churchyard – after one of the City gates that formerly stood here, thought to commemorate Saint Earconwald, Bishop of London in the 7th century[60][61]
  • Blackfriars Bridge, Blackfriars Court, Blackfriars Lane, Blackfriars Passage and Blackfriars Underpass – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538[62][63]
  • Blomfield Street – after Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London 1828–1856[64][65]
  • Bloomberg Arcade – after its owners/developers Bloomberg L.P.
  • Bolt Court – thought to be after a former tavern called the Bolt-in-Tun[66][67]
  • Bond Court – after a 17th-century property developer of this name[68][69]
  • Booth Lane
  • Botolph Alley and Botolph Lane – after the St Botolph Billingsgate church which stood near here, destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666[68][39][70]
  • Bouverie Street – after William Bouverie, 1st Earl of Radnor[71][72]
  • Bow Churchyard and Bow Lane – after the adjacent St Mary-le-Bow church; it was formerly known as Hosier Lane (after the local stocking making trade), and prior to that Cordewanere Street (meaning ‘leather-workers’)[73][2][72]
  • Brabant Court – thought to be after the Dutch/Belgian province of this name, though possibly a corruption of a personal name (prior to the 18th century it was known as Braben Court, and before that Brovens Court)[74]
  • Brackley Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here[74][75]
  • Braidwood Passage – presumably after 19th-century fireman James Braidwood
  • Brandon Mews
  • Bread Street – after the bakery trade that formerly took place here[76][77][78]
  • Bream’s Buildings – thought to be named for its 18th-century builder[78]
  • Breton Highwalk – presumably after the 16th–17th-century poet Nicholas Breton
  • Brewer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Brewers hall
  • Brick Court – as this was home to the first set of brick buildings in the area[79]
  • Bride Court, Bride Lane, St Bride’s Avenue, St Bride’s Passage and St Bride Street – after the adjacent St Bride's Church[80][39][79]
  • Bridewell Place – after the adjacent St Bride's Church and a well that was formerly located here in the early Middle Ages; the name was later given to Bridewell Palace (demolished in the 1860s[81][79]
  • Bridgewater Highwalk, Bridgewater Square and Bridgewater Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here[74][75]
  • Britannic Highwalk
  • Broadgate and Broadgate Circle – developed in the late 1980s, presumably named for the former Broad Street station on this site and the adjacent Bishopsgate
  • Broad Lane, Broad Street Avenue, New Broad Street and Old Broad Street – simply a descriptive name, dating to the early Middle Ages; the northern-most section was formerly ‘New Broad Street’; however, this has now switched onto an adjacent sidestreet[82][83][84]
  • Broken Wharf – this wharf fell into disrepair owing to a property dispute in the 14th century[85][86]
  • Brown’s Buildings
  • Brushfield Street – after Thomas Brushfield, Victorian-era representative for this area at the Metropolitan Board of Works; the western-most section, here forming the boundary with Tower Hamlets, was formerly called Union Street[87][88]
  • Bucklersbury and Bucklersbury Passage – after the Buckerel/Bucherel family who owned land here in the 1100s[87][89][90]
  • Budge Row – formerly home to the drapery trade; a ‘budge/boge’ was a type of lamb’s wool[91][92][90]
  • Bull's Head Passage – thought to be after an inn or shop of this name[93][90]
  • Bunyan Court – after the author John Bunyan, who attended the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate church
  • Burgon Street – after Dean Burgon of St Paul’s Cathedral; prior to 1885 it was called New Street[94]
  • Bury Court and Bury Street – after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s[95][96][55]
  • Bush Lane – thought to be after a former inn of this name[95][97][98]
  • Byward Street – after the adjacent Byward Tower of the Tower of London[99][98]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

  • Eastcheap – as it was the eastern end of the former Cheapside market[183][182]
  • East Harding Street and West Harding Street – after local 16th-century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for the upkeep of widows[184][185]
  • East Passage – presumably descriptive
  • East Poultry Avenue and West Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market[186]
  • Eldon Street – after John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon, Lord Chancellor in the early 19th century, or a tavern named after him[187][188]
  • Elm Court – after the elm trees in the Temple Gardens[189][190]
  • Essex Court – presumably after the earls of Essex, who owned a townhouse near here (hence the nearby Essex Street)[191][192]
  • Exchange Arcade, Exchange Place and Exchange Square

F[edit]

G[edit]

  • Garden Court – after the adjacent Temple Gardens[229]
  • Gardner’s Lane – unknown, though thought to be after a local property owner; formerly called Dunghill Lane in the 18th century[230][229]
  • Garlick Hill – as it led to the former Garlick Hythe, a wharf where garlic was unloaded from ships[231][229]
  • George Yard – after the adjacent George and Vulture pub,[232] or another pub of this name formerly located here[233]
  • Giltspur Street – thought to be the former location of a spurriers[234][235][236]
  • Gloucester Court
  • Godliman Street – thought to be after Godalming, Surrey, a family bearing this name, or the selling of godalmins (a type of skin/leather); it was formerly Paul’s Chain, after the chain placed here to prevent access to St Paul’s churchyard[237][238]
  • Golden Lane – formerly Goldynglane, thought to be after a local property owner of the name Golding/Golda[237][238]
  • Goldsmith Street – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths[239][240]
  • Goodman’s Court and Goodman’s Yard – thought to be after the Goodman family, local farmers in the 16th century[239][241]
  • Gophir Lane – formerly Gofaire Lane, thought to be for Elias Gofaire, 14th-century property owner[242][243]
  • Goring Street – unknown; prior to 1885 known as Castle Court, after a former inn[242]
  • Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called 'Goswelle' or 'Goderell' which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk,[244] whilst others state it derives from "God's Well", and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship,[245] and others a 'Gode Well' formerly located here[246]
  • Gough Square – after Richard Gough, wool merchant, local landowners in the early 1700s[242][246]
  • Gracechurch Street – formerly Garscherch Street, Grass Church Street and Gracious Street, presumably after a local church (mostly likely St Benet Gracechurch and/or grassy area[247][248][249]
  • Grand Avenue – presumably descriptive[250]
  • Grant's Quay Wharf
  • Gravel Lane – descriptive, after its gravelly texture[251][252]
  • Great Bell Alley – formerly just Bell Alley, it was named for a former inn[251][253]
  • Great Eastern Walk (Liverpool Street station) – presumably descriptive, or after the Great Eastern Railway company
  • Great New Street, Little New Street, Middle New Street, New Street Court, New Street Square – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply as they were then new[254][185]
  • Great St Helen’s and St Helen’s Place – after the adjacent St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate and former priory here of the same name[255][256]
  • Great St Thomas Apostle – after the St Thomas the Apostle church, destroyed in the Great Fire[255][256]
  • Great Swan Alley – after a former inn here called The White Swan[257][258]
  • Great Tower Street – after the adjacent Tower of London[257][258]
  • Great Trinity Lane, Little Trinity Lane and Trinity Lane – after the former Holy Trinity the Less church, demolished 1871[257][258]
  • Great Winchester Street – following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the nearby Austin Friars was acquired by Sir William Powlet, Lord Treasurer; his son Lord Winchester renamed it for himself[257]
  • Green Arbour Court – thought to be from a 17th-century inn[257]
  • The Green Yard
  • Gresham Street – after Thomas Gresham, merchant and founder the Royal Exchange; the western part of this street was formerly known as Lad Lane, and the eastern part Cat Eaton Street (named literally after the cats here); they were amalgamated in 1845[259][260][261]
  • Greyfriars Passage – after the Franciscan order, also known as the Grey friars, who owned land here in the Middle Ages[262][263]
  • Greystoke Place – after a local 18th-century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Black Raven Alley, after a local inn[264][263]
  • Grocer’s Hall Court and Grocer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Grocers[263]
  • Groveland Court
  • Guildhall Buildings and Guildhall Yard – after the adjacent Guildhall[265]
  • Guinness Court
  • Gunpowder Square
  • Gutter Lane – corruption of Guthrun/Godrun, thought to be after an early Danish landowner[266][267]

H[edit]

  • Half Moon Court – after a former inn of this name[268][267]
  • Hammett Street – after its 18th-century builder Benjamin Hammett, also Lord Mayor of London in 1797[269]
  • Hanging Sword Alley – thought to be after a former inn, shop or fencing school of this name[268][270]
  • Hanseatic Walk – presumably in reference to Hanseatic League
  • Hare Place – after Hare House which formerly stood here; formerly Ram Alley, a noted criminal area, prompting the name change[258]
  • Harp Alley – thought to be after a former 17th-century inn of this name[271][272]
  • Harp Lane – after the Harp brewhouse which formerly stood here[271][51][272]
  • Harrow Place – thought to be named for a harrow-making shop formerly located here after a former inn of this name[273][274]
  • Hart Street – unknown, formerly Herthstrete and Hertstrete, possibly after the hearthstone trade here[275][235][274]
  • Hartshorn Alley – after the Hart’s Horn inn which formerly stood here[275][276]
  • Haydon Street and Haydon Walk – after John Heydon, Master of the Ordnance 1627-42, who lived near here[277][276]
  • Hayne Street – after Haynes timber merchants and carpenters, who owned a shop here after a former inn of this name[277][278]
  • Hen and Chicken Court – after a former inn(s) here of this name[279]
  • Heneage Lane and Heneage Place – after Thomas Heneage, who acquired a house here after the dissolution of the nearby abbey[280][55]
  • High Holborn, Holborn, Holborn Circus and Holborn Viaduct – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that rode led away from the river to higher ground. 'Circus' is a British term for a road junction, and 'viaduct' is a self-explanatory term.[281][282][283]
  • High Timber Street – after a former timber hythe (wharf), recorded here from the late 13th century[284][285][286]
  • Hind Court
  • Hogarth Court – the artist William Hogarth formerly lodged here at a local tavern[287][288]
  • Honey Lane – after honey that was formerly sold here as art of the Cheapside market[289][290][291]
  • Hood Court
  • Hope Square
  • Hosier Lane – after the former hosiery trade based here[292][293][294]
  • Houndsditch – generally thought to be literally after a local ditch where dead dogs were dumped;[295] however, others think it may refer to a nearby kennels[292][296][297]
  • Huggin Court and Huggin Hill – formerly Hoggen Lane, as hogs were kept here[298][291][297]
  • Hutton Street

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

  • Mac’s Place
  • Magpie Alley – after a former inn here of this name[340][356]
  • Mansell Street – named after either local landowner Sir William Leman, 2nd Baronet for his wife Mary Mansell[357] or Mansel Leman, also a local property owner in the 17th century[358]
  • Mansion House Place and Mansion House Street – after the adjacent Mansion House[359]
  • Mark Lane – unknown, though possibly a corruption of ‘Martha’; formerly known as Martlane and Marke Lane[360][361][362]
  • Martin Lane – after the former St Martin Orgar church, demolished (save for the tower) in 1820[363][327][364][365]
  • Mason’s Avenue – after the Worshipful Company of Masons, whose headquarters formerly stood here[363]
  • Middle Street – descriptive[366]
  • Middlesex Passage – formerly Middlesex Court, thought to be after Middlesex House which formerly stood here[367]
  • Middlesex Street (Petticoat Lane) and Petticoat Square – as this street forms the boundary of the City with the county of Middlesex, with the alternative name Petticoat stemming from the clothes market formerly held here; prior to 1602 it was known as Hog Lane after the animal[367][368][366]
  • Middle Temple Lane – after the adjacent Middle Temple[367][366]
  • Milk Street – after the milk and dairy trade that formerly occurred here in connection with the nearby Cheapside market[369][370][371]
  • Millennium Bridge – as it was built to commemoration the 2000 millennium
  • Milton Court and Milton Street – after an early 19th-century lease owner of this name, or possibly the poet John Milton; prior to this it was Grub/Grubbe Street, after the former owner, or perhaps to a 'grube' (drain)[372][373][374]
  • Mincing Lane – after ‘minchins/mynecen’, a term for the nuns who formerly held property here prior to 1455[372][375][376]
  • Minerva Walk
  • Miniver Place – after the type of fur, named by connection with the nearby Skinner's Hall[377]
  • Minories – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters (Sorores Minores) nuns[372][161][378]
  • Minster Court and Minster Pavement
  • Mitre Square and Mitre Street – after the former Mitre Inn which stood near here[372][276]
  • Modern Court
  • Monkwell Square – after the former street here also of this name, variously recorded as Mogwellestrate or Mukewellestrate, and thought to refer to a well owned by one Mucca[379][380][381]
  • Montague Street – after Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu, who owned a mansion here[382]
  • Monument Street – after the nearby Monument to the Great Fire of London[382][383]
  • Moorfields and Moorfield Highwalk – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here[382]
  • Moorgate and Moorgate Place – after the gate, leading to the marshy moorlands beyond, that formerly stood here[382][384]
  • Moor Lane and Moor Place – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here[382][385][384]
  • Muscovy Street – after the Muscovy Company of Elizabethan times, or the Russian merchants formerly based here[386][387]

N[edit]

  • Nettleton Court
  • Nevill Lane
  • New Bell Yard
  • New Bridge Street – named in 1765 as it leads to the then new Blackfriars Bridge[388][389]
  • Newbury Street – formerly New Street, renamed 1890 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name[388][390]
  • Newcastle Close – either after a former inn called the Castle located here,[388] or after the city, with reference to the coal trade here[391]
  • Newcastle Court
  • New Change, New Change Passage and Old Change Court – formerly Old Change, and named for a former mint and gold exchange here[388][392]
  • New Court – built circa 1700 and named simply because it was then new[393]
  • Newgate Street – after a new gate built here in the 1000s; the eastern part of this street was formerly Bladder Street, after the bladder selling trade here[394][395][390]
  • Newman’s Court – after Lawrence Newman, who leased land here in the 17th century[392]
  • New Street – named simply as it was new when first built[254][390]
  • New Union Street – named as it united Moor Lane and Moorfields; it was formerly Gunn Alley[254]
  • Nicholas Lane and Nicholas Passage – after the former St Nicholas Acons church, destroyed in the Great Fire[254][396][397]
  • Noble Street – after Thomas de Noble, local 14th-century property developer[398][397]
  • Northumberland Alley – after Northumberland House, house of the Earls of Northumberland, which formerly stood here[399][400]
  • Norton Folgate – the former word a corruption of ‘North Town’, and the latter after the local Folgate family[399]
  • Norwich Street – unknown; formerly Norwich Court, and prior to that Magpie Yard, probably from a local inn[400]
  • Nun Court – thought to be after a local builder/property owner[401]

O[edit]

  • Oat Lane – as oats were formerly sold here in the Middle Ages[402][291][403]
  • Octagon Arcade (Broadgate)
  • Old Bailey – after a bailey fortification that formerly stood here[82][404][403]
  • Old Billingsgate Walk – after the former watergate of this name, the derivation of ‘Billings’ in unknown[58]
  • Old Jewry – after a Saxon-era settlement of Jews here, thought to be termed ‘Old’ following the Edict of Expulsion of all Jews from England by Edward I[405][307][406]
  • Old Mitre Court – after a former tavern of this name here[405][406]
  • Old Seacole Lane – thought to be after the coal trade that came from the sea and up the river Fleet here[407][408][409]
  • Old Watermen's Walk
  • Outwich Street – after either Oteswich/Ottewich, meaning ‘Otho’s dwelling’, a name for this area of London in the early Middle Ages[410] or the former St Martin Outwich church, named for the Outwich family, demolished 1874[411]
  • Oystergate Walk – after a watergate here, and the oyster trade[412]
  • Oxford Court – after a former house here owned by the Earls of Oxford[410][413]

P[edit]

  • Pageantmaster Court
  • Pancras Lane – after St Pancras, Soper Lane church which stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire; it was formerly Needlers Lane, after the needle making trade here[414][305][415]
  • Panyer Alley – after a Medieval brewery here called the ‘panyer’ (basket)[414][416][417]
  • Paternoster Lane, Paternoster Row and Paternoster Square – after the paternoster (rosary) makers who formerly worked here[418][419][420]
  • Paul’s Walk
  • Pemberton Row – after James Pemberton, Lord Mayor of London in 1611[421]
  • Pepys Street – after 17th-century diarist Samuel Pepys, who lived and worked here[422][423]
  • Peterborough Court – after the abbots of Peterborough, who prior to the Dissolution of the Monasteries had a house here[424][425]
  • Peter’s Hill – after St Peter, Paul's Wharf church, which formerly stood here until destroyed in the 1666 fire[424][425]
  • Petty Wales – unknown, but possibly after a Welsh community formerly based here[426]
  • Philpot Lane – commemorates prominent local family the Philpots; originally probably after John Philpot, 14th-century grocer[427][428][429]
  • Pilgrim Street – thought to be a former route for pilgrims to St Paul's cathedral; formerly known as Stonecutters Alley and Little Bridge Street[430]
  • Pindar Street – after Paul Pindar, 14th–16th-century diplomat, who had a house here[431][430]
  • Pinner’s Passage
  • Plaisterers Highwalk – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Plaisterers
  • Plantation Lane
  • Playhouse Yard – after the Blackfriars Playhouse, which stood here in the 17th century[41][432]
  • Pleydell Court and Pleydell Street – formerly Silver Street, it was renamed in 1848 by association with the neighbouring Bouverie Street; the Bouverie family were by this time known as the Pleydell-Bouveries[41][72]
  • Plough Court – thought to be either from an inn of this name, or an ironmongers; formerly Plough Yard[41]
  • Plough Place – after the Plough/Plow, a 16th-century eating place located here[41][432]
  • Plumtree Court – thought to be after either literally a plumtree, or else an inn of this name[41][432]
  • Pope’s Head Alley – after the Pope’s Head Tavern which formerly stood here, thought to stem from the 14th-century Florentine merchants who were in Papal service[433][434]
  • Poppins Court – shortening of Popinjay Court, meaning a parrot; it is thought to stem from the crest of Cirencester Abbey (which featured the bird), who owned a town house here[435][436]
  • Portsoken Street – after ‘port-soke’, as it was a soke near a port (gate) of the City[437][438]
  • Post Office Court – after the General Post Office which formerly stood near here[437][439]
  • Poultry – after the poultry which was formerly sold at the market here[437][440][441]
  • Priest’s Court – with allusion to the adjacent St Vedast Church[442]
  • Primrose Hill – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here; formerly called Salisbury Court, as it approaches Salisbury Square[443][442]
  • Primrose Street – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here[443][442]
  • Prince’s Street – named in reference to the adjacent King and Queen Streets[444][445]
  • Printers Inn Court – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here
  • Printer Street – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here[446][445]
  • Priory Court
  • Prudent Passage
  • Pudding Lane – from the former term ‘pudding’ meaning animals' entrails, which were dumped here in Medieval times by local butchers; it was formerly Rothersgate, after a watergate located here[446][447][448]
  • Puddle Dock – thought to be either descriptive (after the water here), or named for a local wharf owner of this name[449][450]
  • Pump Court – after a former pump located here[450]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

  • Rangoon Street – after the former warehouses here of the East India Company, Burma then been part of British India[299][457]
  • Red Lion Court – after a former inn of this name[458][459]
  • Regent Street - after the Prince Regent
  • Rising Sun Court – after the adjacent pub of this name[460]
  • Robin Hood Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name[461]
  • Rolls Buildings and Rolls Passage – the former site of a house containing the rolls of Chancery[462][463]
  • Rood Lane – after a former rood (cross) set up at St Margaret Pattens in the early 16th century; it became an object of veneration and offering, which helped pay for the repair of the church, but was torn down in 1558 as an item of excessive superstition[464][465][466]
  • Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here[464][466]
  • Rose Alley – after a former inn of this name[467]
  • Rose and Crown Court
  • Rose Street – after a former tavern of this name here; it was formerly Dicer Lane, possibly after either a dice maker here, or a corruption of ‘ditcher’[468]
  • Royal Exchange Avenue and Royal Exchange Buildings – after the adjacent Royal Exchange[469]
  • Russia Row – possibly to commemorate Russia's entry into the Napoleonic wars[470]

S[edit]

T[edit]

  • Talbot Court – after a former inn of this name (or 'Tabard')[530][529]
  • Tallis Street – after the 16th-century composer Thomas Tallis, by connection with the adjacent former Guildhall School of Music and Drama[531][532]
  • Telegraph Street – renamed (from Bell Alley, after a former inn) when the General Post Office’s telegraph department opened there[533][518][534]
  • Temple Avenue and Temple Lane – after the adjacent Temple legal district[533][535]
  • The Terrace (off King’s Bench Walk) – presumably descriptive
  • Thavies Inn – after a house here owned by the armourer Thomas (or John) Thavie in the 14th century[536][537]
  • Thomas More Highwalk – after 16th-century author and statesman Thomas More
  • Threadneedle Street and Threadneedle Walk – originally Three Needle Street, after the sign on a needle shop located here, later corrupted due to the obvious collocation of ‘thread’ and ‘needle’[538][539][540]
  • Three Barrels Walk
  • Three Cranes Walk
  • Three Nun Court
  • Three Quays Walk
  • Throgmorton Avenue and Throgmorton Street – after 16th-century diplomat Nicholas Throckmorton; the Avenue was built in 1876[538][315][540]
  • Tokenhouse Yard – after a 17th-century token house here (a house selling tokens during coin shortages)[541][542]
  • Took’s Court – after local 17th-century builder/owner Thomas Tooke[541][543]
  • Tower Hill Terrace – after the adjacent Tower Hill[544][545]
  • Tower Royal – after a former Medieval tower and later royal lodging house that stood here; ‘Royal’ is in fact a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from[544][545]
  • Trig Lane – after one of several people with the surname Trigge, recorded here in the Middle Ages[526]
  • Trinity Square – after the adjacent Trinity House[546][547]
  • Trump Street – unknown, but thought to be after either a local builder or property owner[546] or the local trumpet-making industry[547]
  • Tudor Street – after the Tudor dynasty, with reference to Henry VIII’s nearby Bridewell Palace[546][548]
  • Turnagain Lane – descriptive, as it is a dead-end; recorded in the 13th century as Wendageyneslane[549][550][548]

U[edit]

  • Undershaft – named after a maypole (or ‘shaft’) that formerly stood nearby at the junction of Leadenhall Street and St Mary Axe[500][551]
  • Union Court – named as when built it connected Wormwood Street to Old Broad Street[552]

V[edit]

W[edit]

  • Waithman Street – after Robert Waithman, Lord Mayor of London 1823-33[558][559]
  • Walbrook and Walbrook Wharf – after the Walbrook stream which formerly flowed here, possibly with reference to the Anglo-Saxon 'wealh' meaning 'foreigner' (i.e. the native Britons, or 'Welsh')[560][561][562]
  • Wardrobe Place and Wardrobe Terrace – after the Royal Wardrobe which formerly stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666[563][564]
  • Warwick Lane, Warwick Passage and Warwick Square – after the Neville family, earls of Warwick, who owned a house near here in the 1400s; formerly Old Dean’s Lane, after a house here resided in by the Dean of St Paul’s[565][566][567]
  • Watergate – after a watergate which stood here on the Thames[565][567]
  • Water Lane – after a former watergate that stood here by the Thames; formerly Spurrier Lane[568]
  • Watling Court and Watling Street – corrupted from the old name of Athelingestrate (Saxon Prince Street), by association with the more famous Roman Watling Street[565][569][570]
  • Well Court – after the numerous wells formerly located in this area[571]
  • Whalebone Court
  • Whitecross Place
  • Whitecross Street – after a former white cross which stood near here in the 1200s[106][572]
  • Whitefriars Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I[106][572]
  • White Hart Court – after a former inn of this name[106][573]
  • White Hart Street
  • White Horse Yard – after a former inn of this name[574][572]
  • White Kennett Street – after White Kennett, rector of St Botolph's Aldgate in the early 1700s[574][572]
  • White Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, destroyed by fire in 1765[574][572]
  • White Lion Hill – this formerly led to White Lion Wharf, which is thought to have been named after a local inn[574]
  • White Lyon Court
  • Whittington Avenue – after Richard Whittington, former Lord Mayor of London[574][575]
  • Widegate Street – thought to be after a gate that formerly stood on this street; formerly known as Whitegate Alley[576][577]
  • Willoughby Highwalk – presumably after Sir Francis Willoughby, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church
  • Wilson Street
  • Wine Office Court – after an office here that granted licenses to sell wine in the 17th century[578][579]
  • Wood Street – as wood and fire logs were sold here as part of the Cheapside market[580][395][581]
  • Wormwood Street – after the wormwood formerly grown here for medicine[100][582]
  • Wrestler’s Court – after a former Tudor-era house here of this name[582]

See also[edit]

List of eponymous roads in London

References[edit]

Citations

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Sources

  • Ekwall, Eilert (1954). Streets Names of the City of London. Claredon Press.
  • Fairfield, Sheila (1983). The Streets Of London: A Dictionary Of The Names And Their Origins. Papermac. ISBN 978-0-333-28649-4.
  • Bebbington, Gillian (1972). London Street Names. BT Batsford. ISBN 978-0-333-28649-4.