Strizh (train)

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Strizh
Strizh Logo.png
Вагоны Talgo на Киевском вокзале.jpg
In service 2015–present
Manufacturer Talgo, Transmashholding
Family name Talgo (Talgo 9)
Formation 18
Capacity 414
Operator(s) Russian Railways
Line(s) served Moscow Railway
Gorky Railway
Specifications
Car length 13.88 m (45.5 ft)
Width 2.9 m (9 ft 6 in) and 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in)
Height 4.4 m (14 ft 5 in)
Floor height 760 mm (29.9 in)
Platform height 200 mm (7.9 in) and 550 mm (21.7 in)
Maximum speed 200 km/h (124 mph)
Weight 667 t (656 long tons; 735 short tons)
Power output 6,000 kW (8,000 hp)
Tractive effort 328 kN (74,000 lbf) (starting)
296 kN (67,000 lbf) @ 97 km/h (60 mph) (continuous)
Current collection method Pantograph
Safety system(s) KLUB-U
Track gauge 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 2732 in) Russian gauge

The Strizh (Russian: Стриж, lit. 'Swift') is a Russian low-floor high speed express train.[1][2]

Main information[edit]

The trains have been running between Moscow and Nizhny Novgorod since 1 June 2015 and between Moscow and Berlin since 17 December 2016.[3] On the Moscow — Nizhny Novgorod line, they make 1 to 3 stops, linking the two cities in 3 hours 35 minutes (when they only stop in Vladimir).[4] The cars are pulled by an EP20 locomotive.[5][6]

In 2016, Russian Railways also connected Moscow and Berlin using the Strizh. The travel time between the two cities is a little over 20 hours.[3] [7]

For 2018 FIFA World Cup, Russian Railways purchased wide-bodyshell Talgo trains for other services. The cars will be pulled by EP1 locomotives in east of Mariinsk, while EP20 in west of Mariinsk.

In Kazakhstan, wide-bodyshell Talgo trains have operated since 2013, built by Tulpar-Talgo.

In 2016, wide-bodyshell Talgo trains underwent trial runs in India.

Lines[edit]

The Strizh train currently operates on two lines:

Moscow — Nizhny Novgorod line[edit]

The Strizh trains run between Moscow and Nizhny Novgorod since 1 June 2015. They make 1 to 3 stops on the line: in Dzerzhinsk, Kovrov and Vladimir.[4] The travel time between Moscow and Nizhny Novgorod is between 3 hours 35 minutes, when it stops only in Vladimir, and up to 3 hours 50 minutes with 3 stops.[4] The cars are pulled by an EP20 locomotive.[5]

Another fast train, the Lastochka ("Swallow") operates on the same line but makes 6 stops: in Orekhovo-Zuyevo, Vladimir, Kovrov, Vyazniki, Gorokhovets and Dzerzhinsk, travelling between Moscow and Nizhny Novgorod in 4 hours 06 minutes.[8]

Moscow — Berlin line[edit]

The Strizh trains run between Moscow and Berlin since 17 December 2016.[3] The length of the line is 1896 km.[9] The initial schedule was 2 trains per week, between Moscow Kurskaya and Berlin Ostbahnhof, linking both stations in 20 hours 14 minutes westbound (instead of 24h 49min previously) and 20 hours 35 minutes eastbound (compared with 25h 56min previously).[3] The trains leave from Moscow on Saturdays and Sundays, and from Berlin on Sundays and Mondays.[3] They make intermediate stops in Smolensk, Orsha, Minsk, Brest, Terespol, Warsaw, Poznan, Rzepin and Frankfurt (Oder).

From 11 June 2017, the Strizh trains to/from Berlin will leave and arrive at the station Moscow Smolenskaya (also called Moscow Belarusky) instead of Moscow Kurskaya.[9] Between June 2017 and June 2019, some modernization work on a 100 km railway section between Warsaw and Poznan will force the trains to take a detour which will make the trip longer.[10] After this renovation the speed limit will be 160 km/h on all the length of this section.

Moscow and Berlin are also connected once weekly by the non-Strizh trains from the Moscow - Paris line, which depart from Moscow on each Wednesday evening and from Berlin on each Saturday morning. These trains, using RIC wagons, link both cities in about 24 hours.[11][12]

Media[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Suslova, Anna (4 October 2014). "Новый скоростной поезд РЖД получил имя "Стриж"" [New high-speed train Railways was named "Swift"]. Ridus.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 26 June 2016. 
  2. ^ "Санкт-Петербургский филиал ПГК осуществил перевозку вагонов "Talgo" в Москву" [St. Petersburg branch of the ISC to carry out transportation of "Talgo" cars in Moscow]. Logistic.ru (in Russian). 19 February 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "RZD launches Moscow - Berlin Talgo services". railjournal.com. 19 December 2017. Retrieved 13 May 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c "Расписание поезда "Стриж" по маршруту Москва – Нижний Новгород" [Schedule of the "Strizh" train on the line Moscow - Nizhny Novgorod]. rzd.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 13 May 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Morokhin, Nikolay (27 October 2014). "На "Тальго" быстрее". Gudok (in Russian) (192 (25627)). Retrieved 26 June 2016. 
  6. ^ Plokhotnichenko, Yuri (1 June 2015). "Talgo Москва - Нижний Новгород отправился в первый рейс" [Talgo Moscow - Nizhny Novgorod first run]. Travel.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 26 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Скоростные поезда "Стриж" перевезли более 200 тыс. пассажиров" [High-speed "Swift" trains moved more than 200 thousand passengers] (Press release) (in Russian). JSC Russian Railways. 11 August 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2016. 
  8. ^ "Расписание поезда "Ласточка" по маршруту Москва – Нижний Новгород" [Schedule of the "Lastochka" train on the line Moscow - Nizhny Novgorod]. rzd.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 13 May 2017. 
  9. ^ a b "Расписание поезда "Стриж" по маршруту Москва – Берлин – Москва с 17 декабря 2016 г" [Schedule of the "Strizh" train on the line Moscow - Berlin from 17 December 2016]. rzd.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 13 May 2017. 
  10. ^ "Zbliża się wielki remont trasy kolejowej Poznań-Warszawa. Będą utrudnienia" [A major renovation of the Poznan-Warsaw railway line is approaching. There will be difficulties.]. wyborcza.pl (in Polish). Retrieved 10 June 2017. 
  11. ^ Train Moscow – Berlin
  12. ^ Train Moscow – Berlin – Paris

External links[edit]