Stromeferry railway station

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Stromeferry National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Port an t-Sròim[1]
Waiting Room - geograph.org.uk - 349008.jpg
Location
PlaceStromeferry
Local authorityHighland
Coordinates57°21′08″N 5°33′03″W / 57.3523°N 5.5509°W / 57.3523; -5.5509Coordinates: 57°21′08″N 5°33′03″W / 57.3523°N 5.5509°W / 57.3523; -5.5509
Grid referenceNG865346
Operations
Station codeSTF
Managed byAbellio ScotRail
Number of platforms1
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2014/15Decrease 1,634
2015/16Decrease 1,560
2016/17Decrease 1,254
2017/18Increase 1,378
2018/19Decrease 1,274
History
Original companyDingwall and Skye Railway
Pre-groupingHighland Railway
Post-groupingLMSR
19 August 1870[2]Opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Stromeferry from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Stromeferry railway station is a station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line, serving the village of Stromeferry in the Highlands, northern Scotland. Stromeferry lies on the southern shore of Loch Carron, across from the ruined Strome Castle, near the west coast. It is one of five mandatory calling points on the Kyle line, along with Plockton, Strathcarron, Achnasheen and Garve.

The station is 53 miles 15 chains (85.6 km) from Dingwall, and has a single platform which is long enough for an eight-coach train.[3]

History[edit]

The station opened for passenger traffic on 19 August 1870[4]

On 3 June 1883 the station was occupied by 150 Sabbatarians, defeating the local police force and railway employees, to prevent the despatch of fish to London. They were objecting to the transport of fish on a Sunday.[5]

The station was destroyed by fire along with a train of 14 vehicles on 16 October 1891.[6]

For the first 27 years of its existence it was the line's terminus, bringing prosperity to the village. Steamer services linked to Portree on Skye, and Stornoway on Lewis. With the opening of the extension to Kyle of Lochalsh, steamer services were transferred there.

In the 1970s under British Rail, Stromeferry became the railhead for the Kishorn Yard. Construction material was brought in by train, then transferred by ship.

Services[edit]

The station, looking approximately east

Four trains each way call on weekdays/Saturdays and one each way all year on Sundays, plus a second from May to late September only.[7]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Attadale   Abellio ScotRail
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Duncraig
  Historical railways  
Attadale
Line and station open
  Highland Railway
Left arrow Dingwall and Skye Railway
Kyle of Lochalsh Extension Right arrow
  Duncraig
Line and station open

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brailsford 2017, Gaelic/English Station Index.
  2. ^ Butt 1995, p. 223.
  3. ^ Brailsford 2017, map 22D.
  4. ^ "New Railway in the North". Morning Post. British Newspaper Archive. 20 August 1870. Retrieved 15 August 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "Serious disturbance at Stromeferry". Aberdeen Journal. British Newspaper Archive. 4 June 1883. Retrieved 15 August 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ "Stromeferry Railway Station Burned". Aberdeen Evening Express. British Newspaper Archive. 16 October 1891. Retrieved 15 August 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ GB eNRT May 2016 Edition, Table 239

Sources[edit]

  • Brailsford, Martyn, ed. (December 2017) [1987]. Railway Track Diagrams 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (6th ed.). Frome: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-9-8.
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.

External links[edit]

Media related to Stromeferry railway station at Wikimedia Commons