Strontium peroxide

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Strontium peroxide
BaO2structure.jpg
Identifiers
1314-18-7 YesY
EC Number 215-224-6
Jmol interactive 3D Image
PubChem 14807
Properties
SrO2
Molar mass 119.619 g/mol
Appearance white powder
Odor odorless
Density 4.56 g/cm3 (anhydrous) 1.91 g/cm3 (octahydrate)
Melting point 215 °C (419 °F; 488 K) (decomposes)[1]
slightly soluble
Solubility very soluble in alcohol, ammonium chloride
insoluble in acetone
Structure
Tetragonal [2]
D174h, I4/mmm, tI6
6
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Strontium peroxide is the inorganic compound with the formulaSrO2) is that exists in both anhydrous and octahydrate, both of which are white solids. The anhydrous form adopts a structure similar to that of calcium carbide.[3][4]

Uses[edit]

It is an oxidizing agent used for bleaching. It is used in some pyrotechnic compositions as an oxidizer and a vivid red pyrotechnic colorant. It can also be used as an antiseptic and in tracer munitions.

Production[edit]

Strontium peroxide is produced by passing oxygen over heated strontium oxide. Upon heating in the absence of O2, it degrades to SrO and O2. It is more thermally labilethan BaO2.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Accommodation of Excess Oxygen in Group II Monoxides - S.C. Middleburgh, R.W. Grimes, K.P.D. Lagerlof http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1551-2916.2012.05452.x/abstract
  2. ^ Massalimov, I. A.; Kireeva, M. S.; Sangalov, Yu. A. (2002). Inorganic Materials 38 (4): 363. doi:10.1023/A:1015105922260.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ Bernal, J. D.; D'yatlova, E.; Kasarnovskii, I.; Raikhstein, S. I.; Ward, A. G. "The structure of strontium and barium peroxides" Zeitschrift fuer Kristallographie, Kristallgeometrie, Kristallphysik, Kristallchemie (1935), 92, 344-54.
  4. ^ Natta, G. "Structure of hydroxides and hydrates. IV. Octahydrated strontium peroxide" Gazzetta Chimica Italiana (1932), 62, 444-56.
  5. ^ Accommodation of Excess Oxygen in Group II Monoxides - S.C. Middleburgh, R.W. Grimes, K.P.D. Lagerlof http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1551-2916.2012.05452.x/abstract
  6. ^ Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R. "Theoretical study of the alkaline-earth metal superoxides BeO2 through SrO2" Journal of Physical Chemistry 1992, volume 96, pp. 9259-64. doi:10.1021/j100202a036

See also[edit]