Structural capital

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Structural Capital)
Jump to: navigation, search

Structural capital is one of the three primary components of intellectual capital, and consists of the supportive infrastructure, processes, and databases of the organisation that enable human capital to function.[1] Structural capital is owned by an organization and remains with an organization even when people leave. It includes proprietary software, processes, patents, and trademarks, as well as the organization’s image, organization, information system, and proprietary databases.

Structural capital is everything in an organization that supports employees (human capital) in their work. Structural capital is the supportive infrastructure that enables human capital to function. Structural capital is owned by an organization and remains with an organization even when people leave. Structural capital includes such traditional things as buildings, hardware, software, processes, patents, and trademarks. In addition, structural capital includes such things as the organization’s image, organization, information system, and proprietary databases.

Structural capital includes such traditional things as buildings, hardware, software, processes, patents, and trademarks. In addition, structural capital includes such things as the organization’s image, organization, information system, and proprietary databases. Because of its diverse components, structural capital can be classified further into organization, process and innovation capital. Organizational capital includes the organization philosophy and systems for leveraging the organization’s capability. Process capital includes the techniques, procedures, and programs that implement and enhance the delivery of goods and services. Innovation capital includes intellectual properties and intangible assets.[2] Intellectual properties are protected commercial rights such as copyrights and trademarks. Intangible assets are all of the other talents and theory by which an organization is run.

There are three subcomponents that comprise structural capital:[3][4]

Organizational capital includes the organization philosophy and systems for leveraging the organization’s capability.

Process capital[5] includes the techniques, procedures, and programs that implement and enhance the delivery of goods and services.

Innovation capital[6] includes intellectual property and certain other intangible assets. Intellectual property includes protected commercial rights such as patents, copyrights and trademarks. Intangible assets are all of the other talents and theory by which an organization is run.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maddocks, J. & Beaney, M. 2002. See the invisible and intangible. Knowledge Management, March, 16-17.
  2. ^ Edvinsson, L. & Malone, M.S. 1997. Intellectual Capital: Realizing your Company’s True Value by Finding Its Hidden Roots. New York: Harper Business.
  3. ^ Roos, J., Roos, G., Dragonetti, N. C., & Edvinsson, L. (1997). Intellectual capital. Macmillan Business.
  4. ^ http://staffweb.hkbu.edu.hk/vwschow/lectures/ism3620/rp01.pdf
  5. ^ "Process Capital as Strategic Success Factor: The Lufthansa Example". Handbook on Business Process Management 2: 57–72. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-01982-1_3. 
  6. ^ Chen, Jin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Yuan Xie, Hong (2004). "Measuring intellectual capital: a new model and empirical study". Journal of Intellectual Capital. 5 (1): 195–212. doi:10.1108/14691930410513003. 
  7. ^ Edvinsson, L (1997). "Developing intellectual capital at Skandia". Long range planning. 30 (3): 366–373. doi:10.1016/s0024-6301(97)90248-x. 

External links[edit]