Stuart E. Eizenstat

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Stuart Eizenstat
Stuart eizenstat 8283.JPG
Special Advisor for Holocaust Issues
Assumed office
December 18, 2013
President Barack Obama
Preceded by Position established
United States Deputy Secretary of the Treasury
In office
July 16, 1999 – January 20, 2001
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Lawrence Summers
Succeeded by Kenneth Dam
Undersecretary of State for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs
In office
June 6, 1997 – July 16, 1999
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Joan Spero
Succeeded by Alan Larson
Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade
In office
April 1996 – June 6, 1997
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Timothy Hauser (Acting)
Succeeded by David Aaron
United States Ambassador to the European Union
In office
August 2, 1993 – April 1996
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by James Dobbins
Succeeded by Vernon Weaver
Personal details
Born (1943-01-15) January 15, 1943 (age 72)
Spouse(s) Frances Eizenstat
Alma mater University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Harvard University

Stuart Eizenstat (born January 15, 1943) is an American diplomat and attorney. He served as the United States Ambassador to the European Union from 1993 to 1996 and as the United States Deputy Secretary of the Treasury from 1999 to 2001. He currently serves as a partner at the Washington, D.C.-based law firm Covington & Burling and as a senior strategist at APCO Worldwide.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Stuart E. Eizenstat was born on January 15, 1943. He earned an A.B., cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he was a brother of the Alpha Pi Chapter of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity.[1] He received his Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School in 1967.[1]

Career[edit]

Stuart Eizenstat and Anne Wexler, August 10, 1978

He served as a law clerk for the Honorable Newell Edenfield of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia.

From 1977 to 1981, he was President Jimmy Carter’s Chief Domestic Policy Adviser, and Executive Director of the White House Domestic Policy Staff.[1][2] In 1983, he wrote for Quarante magazine an article entitled, "The Quiet Revolution." He was the first to describe the "feminization of poverty." He was President Bill Clinton's Deputy Secretary of the Treasury (1999–2001), Under Secretary of State for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs (1997–1999), and also served as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade at the International Trade Administration (ITA) from 1996 to 1997.[2] He has served as the United States Ambassador to the European Union from 1993 to 1996 and as co-chairman of the European-American Business Council (EABC).[1] Additionally, he is a member of the Board of Advisors of the Global Panel Foundation.

In 2008, the Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat Distinguished Professorship in Jewish history and culture was endowed in Eizenstat's honor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For his work he has received the Courage and Conscience Award from the Government of Israel, the Knight Commander's Cross (Badge and Star) of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, the French Legion of Honor from the Government of France, and the International Advocate for Peace Award from the Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution.[2]

Personal life[edit]

He was married to the late Frances Eizenstat, and has two sons and eight grandchildren.

Bibliography[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Covington & Burling: Stuart E. Eizenstat
  2. ^ a b c APCO Worldwide: Stuart E. Eizenstat

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
James Dobbins
United States Ambassador to the European Union
1993–1996
Succeeded by
Vernon Weaver
New office Special Advisor for Holocaust Issues
2013–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Timothy Hauser
Acting
Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade
1996–1997
Succeeded by
David Aaron
Preceded by
Joan Spero
Undersecretary of State for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs
1997–1999
Succeeded by
Alan Larson
Preceded by
Lawrence Summers
United States Deputy Secretary of the Treasury
1999–2001
Succeeded by
Kenneth Dam