Löwenstein Formation

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Löwenstein Formation
Stratigraphic range: Norian
Type Geological formation

The Löwenstein Formation (Stubensandstein in Baden-Württemberg, Burgsandstein in Bavaria) is a lithostratigraphic formation of the Keuper in Germany. It is underlain by the Mainhardt Formation and overlain by the Trossingen Formation. It dates back to the middle Norian.[1]

Vertebrate fauna[edit]

Dinosaurs[edit]

Theropod tracks and an unnamed herrersaur genus are known from the Lower Stubensandstein.[3]

Color key
Taxon Reclassified taxon Taxon falsely reported as present Dubious taxon or junior synonym Ichnotaxon Ootaxon Morphotaxon
Notes
Uncertain or tentative taxa are in small text; crossed out taxa are discredited.
Dinosaurs and Archosaurs of the Stubensandstein
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Dolichosuchus[4]

D. cristatus[4]

"Tibia."[5]

Actually indeterminate ceratosaur remains.[4]

Life restoration of Plateosaurus gracilis, formerly known as Sellosaurus gracilis

Halticosaurus[4]

H. longotarsus[4]

"Mandibular fragment, vertebrae, humerus, illium, femur, metatarsal."[5]

Actually indeterminate ceratosaur remains.[4]

Pachysaurus

P. giganteus

"Partial pedes."[6]

Palaeosaurus[4]

P. diagnosticus [4]

Actually Sellosaurus gracilis remains. Yates assigned the type material of Sellosaurus gracilis to Plateosaurus gracilis [7]

Procompsognathus[4]

P. triassicus[4]

"Partial postcranial skeleton."[8]

Sellosaurus[9]

S. fraasi[4]

Yates assigned the type material of Sellosaurus gracilis to Plateosaurus gracilis [7]

S. gracilis[9]

"[Twenty one] partial skeletons, isolated elements, [three] partial skulls, juvenile to adult."[6]

Yates assigned the type material of Sellosaurus gracilis to Plateosaurus gracilis [7]

Teratosaurus[4]

T. minor[4]

Galton and Benton showed that Teratosaurus is actually a rauisuchian.[10][11]

T. trossingensis[4]

Galton and Benton showed that Teratosaurus is actually a rauisuchian.[10][11]

Thecodontosaurus[4]

T. hermannianus[4]

Thecodontosaurus hermannianus was named by Huene (1905), and then recombined as Sellosaurus hermannianus by Huene (1914). Smith and Pol (2007) recombined it as Plateosaurus gracilis[12]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Late Triassic, Europe)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 521–525. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  2. ^ Ceratodus elegans n. sp. aus dem Stubensandstein. P Vollrath, Jahresberichte und Mitteilungen des Oberrheinischen …, 1923
  3. ^ a b "17.2 Baden-Wurrtemberg, Germany; 1. Lower Stubensandstein," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 524.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "17.2 Baden-Wurrtemberg, Germany; 2. Middle Stubensandstein," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 524.
  5. ^ a b "Table 3.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 50.
  6. ^ a b "Table 12.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 236.
  7. ^ a b c Yates, A.M. (2003). "Species taxonomy of the sauropodomorph dinosaurs from the Löwenstein Formation (Norian, Late Triassic) of Germany". Palaeontology 46 (2): 317–337
  8. ^ "Table 3.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 48.
  9. ^ a b "17.2 Baden-Wurrtemberg, Germany; '1. Lower Stubensandstein' and '2. Middle Stubensandstein,'" in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 524.
  10. ^ a b Galton, P. M. (1985). "The poposaurid thecodontian Teratosaurus suevicus von Meyer, plus referred specimens mostly based on prosauropod dinosaurs". Stuttgarter Beiträge zur Naturkunde, B, 116: 1-29.
  11. ^ a b Benton, M.J. (1986). "The late Triassic reptile Teratosaurus - a rauisuchian, not a dinosaur". Palaeontology 29: 293-301.
  12. ^ N. D. Smith and D. Pol. 2007. Anatomy of a basal sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Hanson Formation of Antarctica. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 52(4):657-674

References[edit]

  • Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. 861 pp. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.