Stull, Kansas

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Stull, Kansas
Unincorporated community
A view of Stull looking southwest. The building on the left is the former United Methodist Church, and the building on the right is an abandoned store.
A view of Stull looking southwest. The building on the left is the former United Methodist Church, and the building on the right is an abandoned store.
Stull is located in Kansas
Stull
Stull
Location within the state of Kansas
Stull is located in the US
Stull
Stull
Stull (the US)
Coordinates: 38°58′16″N 95°27′22″W / 38.97111°N 95.45611°W / 38.97111; -95.45611Coordinates: 38°58′16″N 95°27′22″W / 38.97111°N 95.45611°W / 38.97111; -95.45611[1]
Country United States
State Kansas
County Douglas
Elevation[1] 938 ft (286 m)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code 785
FIPS code 20-68725 [1]
GNIS ID 0479114 [1]

Stull is an unincorporated community in Douglas County, Kansas, United States.[1] Founded in 1857, the settlement was initially known as Deer Creek until it was renamed after its only postmaster, Sylvester Stull. As of 2018, only a handful of structures remain in the area.

Since the 1970s, the town has became infamous due to an apocryphal legend that claims the nearby Stull Cemetery is possessed by demonic forces. Despite its falsity, this legend has also became a facet of American popular culture, and has been referenced in numerous forms of media.

Geography[edit]

Stull is located at 38°58′16″N 95°27′32″W / 38.97111°N 95.45889°W / 38.97111; -95.45889 (38.9711124, -95.4560872),[1] at the corner of North 1600 Road ( CR-442) and East 250 Road ( CR-1023) in Douglas County, which is 7 miles west from the outskirts of Lawrence and 10 miles east of the Topeka city limit.

History[edit]

Stull first appeared on territorial maps in 1857.[2][3] During this time, the settlement was called Deer Creek.[3] It is unclear where this name came from, although Martha Parker and Betty Laird speculate that it could either be a translation of an indigenous location name or that it could have arisen after a deer was seen by a body of water.[4] The first settlers in the area spoke German as their native language.[5] Some had come from Pennsylvania Dutch Country, whereas others had recently fled the German Confederation "for more freedom and to escape military duty."[6]

During the late 1850s, the handful of families living in Deer Creek organized a church that met in the homes of its members until 1867, when a stone structure called the "Evangelical Emmanuel and Deer Creek Mission" was built; this church later became known simply as "Evangelical Emmanuel Church".[5][6] Until 1908, the sermons at the small chapel were preached in German.[5] In 1867, a cemetery was chartered for the town next to the church.[6][nb 1] In 1922, those living in Stull raised $20,000 to construct a new, wooden-framed church across the road. The following year, the church changed its official name from "Deer Creek Church" to "Stull Evangelical Church". The old stone Evangelical Emmanuel Church was abandoned by the community in 1922, and over the course of the 20th century, the church slowly fell into a greater and greater state of decrepitude, finally being demolished in 2002.[6][nb 2]

In the late 1890s, a telephone switchboard was added to the house of a Stull resident named J. E. Louk, and soon thereafter, on April 27, 1899, a post office was established in the back of the very same building.[2][10] The town's first and only postmaster was Sylvester Stull, from whom the town derived its name.[10] According to Parker and Laird, the United States post office simply selected the name based on the name of the postmaster.[11] The name stuck even after the post office was discontinued in 1903.[10][11]

Stull was always small: in 1912 only 31 people lived in the area, and at its maximum size the settlement comprised about fifty individuals.[10][12] Christ Kraft, an inhabitant of the settlement during the 20th century, recalls that life in the small town was "quiet and easy, sometimes even boring."[13] Before automobiles were popular in the area, trips to Lecompton, Lawrence, and Topeka, took two, three, and four hours, respectively. In early 20th century, organized baseball became popular in the area, and members of Stull played in a league with members from other Clinton Lake communities, like Clinton and Lone Star.[13] Eventually, a baseball diamond was constructed in Stull.[2] During this time, hunting rabbits was also a popular activity,[14] and it was not uncommon for the Stull community to bring hauls of about 300 freshly-killed rabbits to butchers in Topeka.[2]

During the early 20th century, a number of businesses were established in the area, but most were short-lived; the exception to this general trend was the Louk & Kraft grocery store, which was established in the early 1900s and lasted until 1955.[10][15] The Roaring Twenties brought preliminary discussion about constructing an interurban railroad line between Kansas City and Emporia that would have ran through Stull.[16] Anticipating that their city was about to grow, the residents of Stull began discussing the idea of establishing a "Farmers State Bank" in the area; the Lecompton-based banker J. W. Kreider even secured an official bank charter.[2][13] However, neither the railway or the bank were ever built, possibly due to the advent of the Great Depression.[13]

During the 20th century, the settlement suffered two major tragedies. The first occurred when a young boy wandered into a field that his father was burning and died. The second occurred when a man was found hanging from a tree after going missing.[10][17]

Legend of Stull Cemetery[edit]

Far removed from the horrible story of The Exorcist or the bizarre black masses recently discovered in Los Angeles, and tucked away on a rough county road between Topeka and Lawrence is the tiny town of Stull. Not unlike the town of Sleepy Hollow, described by Washington Irving in his famous tale, Stull is one of those towns motorists can miss by blinking. Stull and Sleepy Hollow have another thing in common. Both are haunted by legends of diabolical, supernatural happenings.

The opening to the University Daily Kansan article "Legend of Devil Haunts Tiny Town", penned by Jain Penner.[18] It was this article that caused Stull to largely be associated with the supernatural in the popular consciousness.[19]

The Stull Cemetery[20] has gained an ominous reputation due to urban legends involving Satan, the occult, and a purported "gateway to Hell".[21] The rumors about the cemetery were popularized by a November 1974 issue of The University Daily Kansan (the student newspaper of the University of Kansas), which claimed that the Devil appeared in Stull twice a year: once on Halloween, and once on the spring equinox.[22][23] People soon said that the cemetery was the location of one of the seven gates to Hell and that the nearby Evangelical Emmanuel Church ruin was "possessed" by the Devil. However, most academics, historians, and local residents are in agreement that the legend has no basis in historical fact and was created and spread by students.[19][23]

In the years that followed the publication of the University Daily Kansan article, it was a popular activity for young folks (especially high school and college students from Lawrence or Topeka) to journey to the cemetery on Halloween or the equinox to "see the Devil". Many would jump fences or otherwise sneak their way onto the property. Over the decades, as the number of people making excursions to the cemetery grew, the graveyard started to deteriorate; this was exacerbated by vandals.[19][23] To combat this, the county's sheriff office patrols the area around the cemetery, especially on Halloween, and will arrest people for trespassing.[24] Those caught inside the cemetery after it is closed could face a maximum fine of $1,000 and up to six months in jail.[21]

Despite its dubious origins, the legend of Stull Cemetery has been referenced numerous times in popular culture. The band Urge Overkill released the Stull EP in 1992, which features the church and a tombstone from the cemetery on the cover.[19][25] Films whose plot is based on the legends include Nothing Left to Fear,[26] Turbulence 3: Heavy Metal,[27] and the unreleased film Sin-Jin Smyth.[27] The cemetery is also the site of the final confrontation between Lucifer and Michael in "Swan Song", the season five finale of the television series Supernatural.[19][28] In-universe, Sam and Dean Winchester (the series' protagonists) are from Lawrence; in a 2006 interview, Eric Kripke (the creator of Supernatural and the showrunner during its first five seasons) revealed that he decided to have the two brothers be from Lawrence because of its closeness to Stull.[29]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Explanatory notes[edit]

  1. ^ This cemetery is not to be confused with Mound View Cemetery, also known as "Old Stull Cemetery", which is located just south of the small town.[7]
  2. ^ In the 1990s, the structure's lost its roof during a microburst.[5] By the turn of the 21st century, the eastern wall of the church ruin had buckled after years of neglect, and in early 2002, the structure's western wall caved in following another strong windstorm. In March of that year, the building was bulldozed. Initially, locals were unsure who had approved the razing, but it was eventually revealed that John Haase, a Lecompton resident who owned the land upon where the church was located, had authorized the demolition after the Douglas County sheriff's department informed him that it was a safety risk.[8][9]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) details for Stull, Kansas; United States Geological Survey (USGS)". United States Board on Geographic Names. October 13, 1978. Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Stull Bicentennial Committee (1976).
  3. ^ a b Thomas (2017), p. 116.
  4. ^ Parker & Laird (1976), p. 93.
  5. ^ a b c d Parker & Laird (1976), pp. 93–4.
  6. ^ a b c d Lecompton Historical Society (1990).
  7. ^ "Mound View Cemetery". Find a Grave. Retrieved May 30, 2018. 
  8. ^ Paget, Mindie (March 30, 2002). "Building's Demolition a Mystery". Lawrence Journal-World. Retrieved May 1, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Local Briefs—Stull: Property Owner Authorized Razing of Abandoned Church". Lawrence Journal-World. March 31, 2002. Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f Fitzgerald (2009), p. 103.
  11. ^ a b Parker & Laird (1976), p. 98.
  12. ^ Blackmar (1912), p. 782.
  13. ^ a b c d Parker & Laird (1976), p. 101.
  14. ^ Parker & Laird (1976), p. 102.
  15. ^ Carpenter, Tim (November 28, 1997). "What's in a Name? Key Elements of Area History". Lawrence Journal-World. p. 3B. Retrieved April 28, 2015. 
  16. ^ Chambers and Tompkins (1977), p. 42.
  17. ^ Parker & Laird (1976), pp. 102–3.
  18. ^ Penner, Jain (November 5, 1974). "Legend of Devil Haunts Tiny Town". The University Daily Kansan. 
  19. ^ a b c d e Thomas (2017), pp. 116–24.
  20. ^ "Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) details for Stull Cemetery, Kansas; United States Geological Survey (USGS)". United States Board on Geographic Names. July 22, 2011. Retrieved April 27, 2017. 
  21. ^ a b Gintowt, Richard (October 26, 2004). "Hell Hath No Fury". Lawrence.com. Retrieved April 26, 2017. 
  22. ^ Smarsh (2010), p. 117.
  23. ^ a b c Heitz (1997), pp. 102–07.
  24. ^ Seba, Erwin (November 1, 1999). "Legends Linger Around Stull". Lawrence Journal-World. Retrieved April 26, 2017. 
  25. ^ Kugelberg (1992), p. 16.
  26. ^ Turek, Ryan (May 29, 2012). "Slash Talks Producing Nothing to Fear". STYD. Retrieved December 15, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b "The Most Haunted Place in Every State (Slideshow)". The Daily Meal. Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  28. ^ Engstrom (2014), p. 95.
  29. ^ Kripke, Eric (October 12, 2006). "Supernatural: Your Burning Questions Answered!". TV Guide. Retrieved September 25, 2017. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]