Stupid Stupid Stupid

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Stupid Stupid Stupid
A close-up of a plastic toy with googly eyes against a black background
Studio album by
Released10 November 1997
RecordedJuly–August 1997
Studio
GenreDance-rock
Length45:03
LabelRadioactive
Producer
Black Grape chronology
It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah
(1995)
Stupid Stupid Stupid
(1997)
Pop Voodoo
(2017)
Singles from Stupid Stupid Stupid
  1. "Get Higher"
    Released: 20 October 1997
  2. "Dadi Waz a Badi"
    Released: 1997
  3. "Marbles"
    Released: 23 February 1998

Stupid Stupid Stupid is the second studio album by British rock band Black Grape, released on 10 November 1997 through Radioactive Records. While touring in support of their debut studio album It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah (1995), vocalist Paul "Kermit" Leveridge was diagnosed with sepsis. Carl "Psycho" McCarthy temporarily filled in Kermit's role, before being added to the line-up permanently. Though he was too ill to tour, Kermit joined the band in Hollywood to work on songs for their next album, which continued throughout 1996. They recorded their second album at Real World Studios in Bath, and Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, California, over eight weeks with Danny Saber, John X Volaitis and frontman Shaun Ryder as producers. Stupid Stupid Stupid is a dance-rock album that continues the party atmosphere of It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah while toning done that album's religious references.

Stupid Stupid Stupid received mixed reviews from music critics, some of whom saw it as a continuation of It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah, while others found it to be an inferior version of that album. It peaked at number 11 in the UK, as well as charting highly in Scotland and Sweden. It would be certified gold in the UK within a few months of release. With an appearance at Phoenix Festival, Saber was made a member of Black Grape. "Get Higher" was released as the lead single from Stupid Stupid Stupid on 20 October 1997, reaching number 12 in Scotland and number 24 in the UK. It was followed by the European-only second single "Dadi Waz a Badi". Following a fight prior to a show, Ryder fired the rest of the band; future touring plans were subsequently cancelled. "Marbles" was released as the album's third single on 23 February 1998, sitting outside of the top 40 in Scotland and the UK. By July 1998, Ryder said he would no longer be recording under the Black Grape name.

Background[edit]

Black Grape released their debut studio album It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah in August 1995.[1] It topped the UK Album Chart for two months, and was eventually certified platinum.[2][3] All three of its singles – "Reverend Black Grape", "In the Name of the Father" and "Kelly's Heroes" – reached the top 20 in the UK, with "In the Name of the Father" peaking the highest at number eight.[2] After flying back to the United Kingdom after a show, vocalist Paul "Kermit" Leveridge fell ill, and was subsequently diagnosed with sepsis.[4][5] In early 1996, the band embarked on a UK tour, with Carl "Psycho" McCarthy covering Kermit's role.[4] At the tour's conclusion, he joined the band on a permanent basis.[6] Dancer Bez left the band over disagreements with finances with the band's label Radioactive Records.[5] Kermit was in a stable condition to help record "England's Irie", a song intended to promote the Euro 1996 football league.[7] Black Grape then toured across the United States and South America with Psycho; Kermit had to miss the trek as a result of a lung infection.[8][9]

Despite Kermit being too ill to tour, he flew to the US in May 1996; him, frontman Shaun Ryder and producer Danny Saber worked on some new songs in a rented house in Hollywood.[10] The band released the non-album single "Fat Neck" in May 1996, which peaked at number ten in the UK.[2][11] Around it, they supported Oasis for two shows, and headlined Tribal Gathering.[10] The following month, Ryder fired their management team Nicholl and Dime on the grounds that they were trying to extort money out of him.[12][13] He tried to find a new manager, being in contact with Nirvana-associate Danny Goldberg and Henry Rollins contactee Richard Bishop, eventually going with Bishop's management company 3AM.[13][14] Kermit and Psycho meanwhile hired the company Hot Soup, which consisted of their touring manager Tony Murray and Ryder's father to manage the pair.[14] "England's Irie" was released as another non-album single that same month, peaking at number six in the UK.[2][15] They headlined the Saturday date of Reading Festival. Throughout the year, the band had spent three separate fortnight-long sessions at the rented Hollywood residence to write material for their next album, with the last occurring in December 1996.[16] They demoed 15 tracks in total while there.[17]

Production[edit]

Ryder did not want to rush into recording their next album, preferring to take a slow-pace approach to it. In the meantime, Saber occupied himself working on Bridges to Babylon (1997) by the Rolling Stones, as well as remix tracks by the likes of David Bowie and U2. Ryder decided to take a break, purchasing a house outside of Cork, Ireland.[16] Black Grape recorded their new album over the course of eight weeks in July and August 1997.[18][19][20] In the midst of recording, Ryder was busy filming scenes for The Avengers (1998); they were accompanied by live member and keyboardist Martin Slattery.[19][21] Sessions were held at Real World Studios in Bath, and Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, California, with Saber, John X Volaitis and Ryder as producers. "Dadi Waz a Badi" had the extra credit of also being produced by It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah producer Stephen Lironi.[22]

Around this time, Kermit and Pyscho were focused on trying to get their side project Manmade started; Ryder theorised that people had told the pair that they did not need him to be successful.[23] Ryder and Saber would often be sitting in the studio waiting for Kermit and Pyscho to show up, who were recording for Manmade instead of for Black Grape. Ryder's frustration about the situation extended to Murray, saying he had a conflict of interest with the pair. Ryder wanted to continue the party atmosphere from their debut, but felt this was unattainable as the collaborative nature of that album was not present while making the new one.[24] He went as far as to compare it to the making of his previous band Happy Mondays' fourth studio album Yes Please! (1992): "The band was splintering and the music really suffered because of it".[25] Volaitis served as the main engineer, with assistance from Marco Milgliari, who was an additional engineer alongside, Phil Ault, Ewan Davis and Saber.[22] Saber claimed that Ryder would recorded as many as 20 tracks of his vocals for every song on the album.[21] Tom Lord-Alge, with assistance from Mauricio Iragorri, mixed the recordings at South Beach Studios in Miami, Florida and Encore Studios in Los Angeles. Ted Jensen then mastered the album at Sterling Sound in New York.[22]

Composition and lyrics[edit]

Musically, the sound of Stupid Stupid Stupid has been described as dance-rock, with influence from soul.[26][27] Author Lisa Verrico in her book High Life 'N' Low Down Dirty: The Thrills and Spills of Shaun Ryder wrote that the album melded together "P-funk, soul, hip hop, rock and drum'n'bass beats with a buoyant brass section, bongos, scratching and the usual smattering of musical steals". It retained the party atmosphere of It's Great When You're Straight...Yeah; it lacked the religious references of that album, with Ryder claiming he put more effort into the lyrics for Stupid Stupid Stupid.[18] The title was taken from an occasion where the band was performing "Reverend Black Grape" on TV and had to change the lyric "talking bullshit... bullshit... bullshit" to "talking stupid... stupid... stupid".[21] All of the tracks were credited to Ryder, Saber, Manmade, except "Lonely" by Posie Knight and Jerry Weaver.[22]

"Get Higher" is about Ryder's drug consumption; its intro consists of spliced speeches of former US president Ronald Reagan, making him sound like he is discussing drug use.[28][29][30] It was taken from a TV advertisement from the 1980s where Reagan and his wife Nancy warned against marijuana usage.[31] Ryder said he had "ripped [off] a bit" of "Reach for Love" (1984) by Marcel King for "Get Higher" in the hopes that listeners would "go back and discover the original".[32] "Squeaky" is about safe sex; its music is a cross between the sound of Led Zeppelin and baggy, with record scratches and duck noises.[28][33] "Marbles" is a trip hop and electronic house track that was compared to the work of Happy Mondays, and continued the vocal sparring found on Black Grape's debut.[18][28][34] "Dadi Waz a Badi" is about having bad parents as role models, and Ryder pondering on whether he is a good father.[35][36] Both it and "Marbles" recalled the sound of Happy Mondays third studio album Pills 'n' Thrills and Bellyaches (1990).[30]

"Rubberband" is an guitar-focused rock song with heavy bass parts, topped by Ryder's distorted voice being run through a flange pedal.[28][33] It channelled the sound of "Devils Haircut" (1996) by Beck and lifts the guitar part from the Pills 'n' Thrills and Bellyaches opening track "Kinky Afro".[33] "Spotlight" includes a musical tribute to Phil Lynott, and is the only track on the album not to feature vocals from Kermit.[22][37] "Tell Me Something" is a drum and bass track with Latin music flourishes, and borrows elements of "Fools Gold" (1989) by the Stone Roses and the psychedelic work of the Byrds.[33] "Money Back Guaranteed" is a series of toilet jokes.[37] "Lonely" is a cover of the Frederick Knight track "I've Been Lonely for So Long (1972); Black Grape's version of the track was compared to Exile on Main St. (1972)-era Rolling Stones.[18][38] They decided to do a version of it after listening to its respective album I've Been Lonely for So Long (1972) while in the studio.[21] The album concludes with the Latin funk of "Words".[30]

Release[edit]

Black Grape played their first show of 1997 performing at Phoenix Festival, which marked the introduction of Saber as a member of the band.[39] In August 1997, the band's documentary – The Grape Tapes – premiered at the Edinburgh Film Festival.[20] It was directed by Tom Bruggen, who originally wanted to make a documentary on Happy Mondays; as that band broke-up, Bruggen filmed the formation of Black Grape.[40] "Get Higher" was released as the album's lead single on 20 October 1997; this version omitted the audio clip of Reagan.[18] Two versions were released on CD: the first with remixes of "Get Higher" and a live version of "Rubberband", while the second included remixes of "Rubberband" and the music video for "Get Higher".[41][42] Stupid Stupid Stupid was released on 10 November 1997, after initially being scheduled for October 1997; it promoted with a tour of the UK that same month.[18][33][43] Ryder said the album's artwork received criticism from some people in the US as the golliwog doll depicted with googly eyes came across as a racist stereotype, to which he responded: "We had two black kids in the band, Kermit and Psycho, who hadn't even thought anything of it".[44]

"Dadi Waz a Badi" was released as a single exclusively in Europe, with a live version of "Rubberband" as its B-side.[45] Prior to a concert in Doncaster on 7 December 1997, Ryder reportedly fired the rest of the band. It came after a fight between the members, and resulted in a previously scheduled New Year's Eve show at Alexandra Palace in London. Representatives on behalf of the band said Ryder was dealing with "nervous exhaustion" as a result of filming The Avengers. They added that they were attempting to have a meeting for the members to sort out their issues.[46] Plans for a music video for their next single, as well as tours of Australia and Japan in early 1998, were cancelled due to the uncertainty of the band's status.[47] In late December 1997, it was confirmed that Kermit departed to focus on Manmade; by January 1998, Psycho was also confirmed to have left Black Grape.[47][48] Ryder claimed a "power play" between Murray and 3AM was the reason for Kermit and Psycho leaving.[48] Ryder also mentioned that Psycho had developed an ego due to the success of Black Grape.[49]

"Marbles" was released as the album's third single on 23 February 1998.[50] Two versions were released on CD: the first with a radio edit, remixes and a demo of "Marbles", while the second featured "Harry the Dog", a remix of "Marbles" and an uncensored music video for "Get Higher".[51][52] After initially being planned for release on 27 January 1998, Stupid Stupid Stupid was eventually released in the US on 24 February 1998.[53][54] Additional tours of Europe and the US were in the planning stages, though these were also cancelled, including an appearance at Glastonbury Festival.[48][55] A representative for Ryder said these cancellations were due to Ryder wanting to make a feature film with Bruggen.[55] In July 1998, Ryder said he would no longer be performing shows or recording new music under the Black Grape moniker.[56]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[57]
The Daily NewsB[58]
Entertainment WeeklyC+[59]
Jornal do Brasil[60]
NME6/10[37]
Pitchfork6.9/10[27]
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette[26]
Rolling Stone[61]
Spin6/10[62]
Wall of Sound55/100[63]

Stupid Stupid Stupid was met with mixed reviews from music critics.[49] It is often considered to be similar to the band's debut album, but without that album's "infectious beats, mammoth hooks, and surreal humour".[57] The Daily News's Michael Mehle wrote that it went "a long way toward streamlining [the sound of their debut] for American audiences", highlighting the "rap influences" and "thick, high-impact dance tracks".[58] MTV reviewer Lily Moayeri said it followed their debut with the "[w]ell-rounded grooves, funky hip-hop rhythms, and soulful vocal offerings with an inherent sense of humor".[35] Ed Masley of Pittsburgh Post-Gazette saw it as a "musical trainwreck of breakbeats, samples, loops and sky-high Wonderwalls of rock guitar".[26] CMJ New Music Monthly writer Andrew Beaujon called it "one hell of a funky document", adding that the "party-in-the-studio patina" that Ryder has been attempting since Happy Mondays was "now fully realized".[38]

Silvio Essinger of Jornal do Brasil considered it "mind-numbing – it has [a] hypnotic swing" that is fronted by "damaged soul, drunken funk and a lot of psychedelicism, all in one puff".[60] Richard T. Thurston for Ink 19 saw it akin to Oasis' works, and call it a "ballsy hybrid of dance and rock that is ripe for young ears".[64] Brent DiCrescenzo of Pitchfork described it as "[l]oud, obnoxious, and perfect for the setting".[27] Entertainment Weekly contributed Mark Bautz saw it as a "lackadaisical effort that verges on dullness", since the majority of the tracks are "so indistinguishable that the disc rapidly descends from a lively groove into a familiar rut".[59] NME's Steve Sutherland called it "a calculatedly offensive gesture almost beautiful in the perfection of its simplicity".[37] The Independent writer Andy Gill thought that it "simply doesn't move like it should", with "no twitch to its funk". He summarised it as being "more dumbed-down than drugged-up."[65]

Eric Weisbard of Spin thought that the "tunes are almost an afterthought this time", signalling that "Dadi Waz a Badi" and "Tell Me Something" were the only songs that "capture the manic pop thrill" of their debut.[62] Wall of Sound's Daniel Durchholz echoed a similar statement, calling it "disconcertingly unfocused and pleasing only in dribs and drabs".[63] Johnny Walker of MTV felt that Saber's "ace production and arsenal of instrumental touches" are not able to hide that the album "doesn't pack the punch of the band's debut". He added that the "insistence here on repeating simplistic choruses ad infinitum start to grate after a while".[30] In a review for Rolling Stone, journalist Greg Kot said that the band "don't quite squeeze out the same head-spinning elixir" as their debut.[61] In a dismissive review from E! Online, the staff there remarked that despite the band's lack of songwriting it "doesn't stop 'em from making CDs", referring to it as "boring and repetitive".[66]

Stupid Stupid Stupid peaked at number 11 in the UK,[2] and was certified gold by the British Phonographic Industry within a few months.[67] It also charted at number ten in Scotland and number 40 in Sweden.[68][69] "Get Higher" reached number 12 in Scotland and number 24 in the UK.[2][70] "Marbles" reached number 44 in Scotland and number 46 in the UK.[2][71] Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ranked Stupid Stupid Stupid as the 8th best album of 1998.[72]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Shaun Ryder, Danny Saber and Manmade, except "Lonely" by Posie Knight and Jerry Weaver. All tracks produced by Saber, John X Volaitis and Ryder, except "Dadi Waz a Badi" by those three and Stephen Lironi.[22]

  1. "Get Higher" – 5:00
  2. "Squeaky" – 5:16
  3. "Marbles" – 4:24
  4. "Dadi Waz a Badi" – 4:01
  5. "Rubberband" – 4:36
  6. "Spotlight" – 3:51
  7. "Tell Me Something" – 3:47
  8. "Money Back Guaranteed" – 5:17
  9. "Lonely" (Frederick Knight cover) – 4:02
  10. "Words" – 4:42

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per booklet.[22]

Charts and certifications[edit]

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "It's Great When You're Straight... Yeah - Black Grape | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 22 October 2021. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Black Grape | full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 23 October 2021. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  3. ^ "Black Grape It's Great When You're Straight....Yeah". British Phonographic Industry. Archived from the original on 23 October 2021. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  4. ^ a b Verrico 1998, p. 203
  5. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Black Grape Biography, Songs, & Albums". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 17 October 2020. Retrieved 21 October 2021.
  6. ^ Cigarettes 1996
  7. ^ Middles 1997, p. 188
  8. ^ Verrico 1998, p. 204
  9. ^ "Black Grape Bio". Radioactive Records. Archived from the original on 15 June 1997. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  10. ^ a b Verrico 1998, p. 205
  11. ^ "Fat Neck - Black Grape | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 25 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  12. ^ "Blue Monday". NME. 15 December 1999. Archived from the original on 15 August 2017. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  13. ^ a b Middles 1997, p. 193
  14. ^ a b Ryder 2012, p. 342
  15. ^ "England's Irie - Black Grape | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 24 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  16. ^ a b Verrico 1998, p. 206
  17. ^ Melody Maker 1997
  18. ^ a b c d e f Verrico 1998, p. 208
  19. ^ a b "New Black Grape CD, Movie For Ryder". MTV. 7 July 1997. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  20. ^ a b "News Flash: Black Grape Finishes Stupid Album". MTV. 25 August 1997. Archived from the original on 9 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d "Black Grape Bio". Radioactive Records. Archived from the original on 20 January 1998. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g Stupid Stupid Stupid (booklet). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1997. RARD 11716.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  23. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 344
  24. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 345
  25. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 347
  26. ^ a b c Masley 1998, p. 31
  27. ^ a b c "Black Grape: Stupid, Stupid, Stupid: Pitchfork Record Review". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on 7 January 2008. Retrieved 24 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  28. ^ a b c d Kaufman, Gil (21 November 1997). "Black Grape Leader Gets Stupid On New LP". MTV. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  29. ^ Solomon, Angela (15 January 1999). "Happy Mondays To Reunite". MTV. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d Walker, Johnny (4 November 1998). "Let's Get Stupid!". MTV. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  31. ^ Forryan, James (3 August 2017). "Where To Start With... Black Grape". HMV. Archived from the original on 12 May 2021. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  32. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 94
  33. ^ a b c d e Harrison 1997, p. 4
  34. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 346
  35. ^ a b Moayeri, Lily. "Black Grape - Stupid Stupid Stupid (Radioactive)". MTV. Archived from the original on 14 September 2000. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  36. ^ Harrison 1998, p. 33
  37. ^ a b c d Sutherland, Steve. "Black Grape - Stupid, Stupid, Stupid". NME. Archived from the original on 17 August 2000. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  38. ^ a b Beaujon 1998, p. 32
  39. ^ Verrico 1998, pp. 207–8
  40. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 306
  41. ^ "Get Higher" (sleeve). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1997. RAXTD 32.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  42. ^ "Get Higher" (sleeve). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1997. RAXXD 32.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  43. ^ Sexton 1998, p. 22
  44. ^ Ryder 2012, p. 239
  45. ^ "Dadi Waz a Badi" (sleeve). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1997. RAD-49053.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  46. ^ Kaufman, Gil (19 December 1997). "News Flash: Black Grape Leader Fires Band After Brawl". MTV. Archived from the original on 9 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  47. ^ a b "Black Grape...What's Going On?". MTV. 24 December 1997. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  48. ^ a b c "Black Grape Is Ryder And Saber". MTV. 28 January 1998. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  49. ^ a b Warburton; Ryder 2011, p. 49
  50. ^ "Marbles - Black Grape | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 24 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  51. ^ "Marbles" (sleeve). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1998. RAXTD 33.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  52. ^ "Marbles" (sleeve). Black Grape. Radioactive Records. 1998. RAXXD 33.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  53. ^ Takiff 1998, p. B9
  54. ^ "Black Grape Squeeze Out Next Album". MTV. 8 September 1997. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  55. ^ a b "Lights, Camera, Inaction: Black Grape Shelved for Ryder's Moovie". NME. 8 March 1998. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  56. ^ "Black Grape May Or May Not Be Crushed, New Film For Ryder". MTV. 17 July 1998. Archived from the original on 7 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  57. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Stupid, Stupid, Stupid - Black Grape | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 3 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  58. ^ a b Mehle 1998, p. 58
  59. ^ a b Bautz, Mark (20 February 1998). "Stupid Stupid Stupid". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 26 November 2020. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  60. ^ a b Essinger 1998, p. 4
  61. ^ a b "Black Grape: Stupid, Stupid, Stupid : Music Reviews". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 12 October 2008. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  62. ^ a b Weisbard 1998, p. 104
  63. ^ a b Durchholz, Daniel. "Review: Stupid Stupid Stupid". Wall of Sound. Archived from the original on 15 April 2001. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  64. ^ Thurston, Richard T. (16 June 2001). "Black Grape Stupid Stupid Stupid". Ink 19. Archived from the original on 27 January 2021. Retrieved 25 November 2021.
  65. ^ Gill, Andy (7 November 1997). "Pop Albums: Black Grape Stupid Stupid Stupid Radioactive RARD 11716". The Independent. Archived from the original on 22 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  66. ^ "Music Review - Black Grape - Stupid Stupid Stupid". E! Online. Archived from the original on 18 February 1999. Retrieved 4 January 2022.
  67. ^ "Black Grape Stupid Stupid Stupid". British Phonographic Industry. Archived from the original on 25 October 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  68. ^ a b "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  69. ^ a b "Swedishcharts.com – Black Grape – Stupid Stupid Stupid". Hung Medien. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  70. ^ "Get Higher". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 25 October 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  71. ^ "Marbles". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 25 October 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  72. ^ Masley 1999, p. 25
  73. ^ "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  74. ^ "British album certifications – Black Grape – Stupid Stupid Stupid". British Phonographic Industry.Select albums in the Format field. Select Gold in the Certification field. Type Stupid Stupid Stupid in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.

Sources

External links[edit]