Suberoyl chloride

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Suberoyl chloride
Suberoyl-chloride-2D-skeletal.png
Suberoyl-chloride-3D-balls.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Octanedioyl dichloride
Other names
Suberoyl dichloride; Suberic acid chloride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.156.463 Edit this at Wikidata
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C8H12Cl2O2/c9-7(11)5-3-1-2-4-6-8(10)12/h1-6H2
    Key: PUIBKAHUQOOLSW-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C(CCCC(=O)Cl)CCC(=O)Cl
Properties
C8H12Cl2O2
Molar mass 211.08 g·mol−1
Density 1.172 g/cm3
Boiling point 162–163 °C (324–325 °F; 435–436 K)
Reacts with water
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS05: Corrosive
Danger
H314
P260, P264, P280, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P321, P363, P405, P501
Flash point 110 °C (230 °F; 383 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Suberoyl chloride is an organic compound with the formula (CH2)6(COCl)2. It is the diacid chloride derivative of suberic acid. It is a colorless liquid although aged samples appear yellow or even brown.

Uses[edit]

Suberoyl chloride is used as a reagent to synthesize hydroxyferrocifen hybrid compounds that have antiproliferative activity against triple negative breast cancer cells. It is also used as a cross-linking agent to cross-link chitosan membranes, and also improves the membrane's integrity.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Suberoyl chloride". Alfa Aesar. Retrieved 16 April 2019.

External links[edit]