Outline of sociology

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The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the discipline of sociology:

Sociology – the study of society[1] using various methods of empirical investigation[2] and critical analysis[3] to understand human social activity, from the micro level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and social structure.[4]

Nature of sociology[edit]

Sociology can be described as all of the following:

  • The study of society.
  • Academic discipline – body of knowledge given to - or received by - a disciple (student); a branch or sphere of knowledge, or field of study, that an individual has chosen to specialise in.
  • Field of science – widely recognized category of specialized expertise within science, and typically embodies its own terminology and nomenclature. Such a field will usually be represented by one or more scientific journals, where peer reviewed research is published. There are many sociology-related scientific journals.
    • Social science – field of academic scholarship that explores aspects of human society.

Essence of sociology[edit]

Sociology

Branches of sociology[edit]

Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary fields involving sociology[edit]

History of sociology[edit]

Theoretical perspectives in sociology[edit]

General sociology concepts[edit]

Sociologists[edit]

Sociological publications[edit]

Sociology journals

Sociological associations[edit]

Sociological associations

Academies[edit]

Related fields[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Comte, Auguste, A Dictionary of Sociology (3rd Ed), John Scott & Gordon Marshall (eds), Oxford University Press, 2005, ISBN 0-19-860986-8, ISBN 978-0-19-860986-5
  2. ^ Ashley D, Orenstein DM (2005). Sociological theory: Classical statements (6th ed.). Boston, Massachusetts, USA: Pearson Education. pp. 3–5, 32–36.
  3. ^ Ashley D, Orenstein DM (2005). Sociological theory: Classical statements (6th ed.). Boston, Massachusetts, USA: Pearson Education. pp. 3–5, 38–40.
  4. ^ Giddens, Anthony, Duneier, Mitchell, Applebaum, Richard. 2007. Introduction to Sociology. Sixth Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company. Chapter 1.
  5. ^ H. Mowlana (2001). "Information in the Arab World", Cooperation South Journal 1.
  6. ^ Dr. S. W. Akhtar (1997). "The Islamic Concept of Knowledge", Al-Tawhid: A Quarterly Journal of Islamic Thought & Culture 12 (3).
  7. ^ Amber Haque (2004), "Psychology from Islamic Perspective: Contributions of Early Muslim Scholars and Challenges to Contemporary Muslim Psychologists", Journal of Religion and Health 43 (4): 357-377 [375].
  8. ^ Enan, Muhammed Abdullah (2007). Ibn Khaldun: His Life and Works. The Other Press. p. v. ISBN 983-9541-53-6.
  9. ^ Alatas, S. H. (2006). "The Autonomous, the Universal and the Future of Sociology". Current Sociology. 54: 7–23 [15]. doi:10.1177/0011392106058831.
  10. ^ Warren E. Gates (July–September 1967). "The Spread of Ibn Khaldun's Ideas on Climate and Culture". Journal of the History of Ideas. University of Pennsylvania Press. 28 (3): 415–422 [415]. doi:10.2307/2708627. JSTOR 2708627.

External links[edit]