Sudanese parliamentary election, 1953

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Sudanese parliamentary election, 1953
Flag of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.svg
2 & 25 November 1953 1958 →

All 97 seats to the Parliament
All 50 seats to the Senate
  First party Second party
  Ismail al-Azahri.jpg Abdallah Khalil Official.png
Leader Ismail al-Azhari Abdullah Khalil
Party NUP Umma Party
Seats won 37
Parliamentary Seats 51 22
Senate Seats 31 8

Chief Minister before election

Abd al-Rahman al-Mahdi

Elected Chief Minister

Ismail al-Azhari

Emblem of Sudan.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Sudan
Constitution

Parliamentary elections were held in Sudan on 2 and 25 November 1953,[1] prior to the implementation of home rule. The result was a victory for the National Unionist Party, which won 51 of the 97 seats in Parliament. The NUP also obtained a majority in the Senate, where they won 21 of the 30 indirectly elected seats (elected by local and provincial councils) and 10 of the 20 members were nominated to the Senate by the British Governor-General. Although the Umma Party and some of the British press alleged that Egypt had interfered in the election, it was generally seen as free and fair.[2]

Results[edit]

Parliament[edit]

Party Votes % Seats
National Unionist Party 229,221 51
Umma Party 190,822 22
Southern Party 9
Republican Socialist Party 3
Anti-Imperialist Front 1
Independents 11
Total 97
Registered voters/turnout 1,687,000
Source: Nohlen et al., Sternberger et al.[3]

Senate[edit]

Party Votes % Seats
Indirectly-elected Nominated Total
National Unionist Party 21 10 31
Umma Party 4 4 8
Southern Party 3 3 6
Republican Socialist Party 1 0 1
Independents 1 3 4
Total 4,092 30 20 50
Registered voters/turnout 4,926 83.1
Source: Nohlen et al., Sternberger et al.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D, Krennerich, M & Thibaut, B (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, p851 ISBN 0-19-829645-2
  2. ^ Cowen, L & Laakso, L (2002) Multi-Party Elections in Africa, p254
  3. ^ Dolf Sternberger, Bernhard Vogel, Dieter Nohlen & Klaus Landfried (1978) Die Wahl der Parlamente: Band II: Afrika, Zweiter Halbband, p1985