Sudanese parliamentary election, 1968

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sudanese parliamentary election, 1968
Flag of Sudan (1956-1970).svg
← 1965 12 April & 2 May 1968 1974 →

All 218 seats to the Parliament
  First party Second party Third party
  Ismail al-Azahri.jpg Al-Sadiq al-Mahdi 1964.jpg Imam al-Mahdi al-Hahdi.png
Leader Ismail al-Azhari Sadiq al-Mahdi Imam al-Hadi al-Mahdi
Party DUP Umma Party-Sadiq Umma Party-Imam
Last election 59 (DUP)
3 (PDP)
New New
Seats won 101 36 30
Seat change Increase38
Popular vote 742,226 384,986 329,952
Percentage 40.8% 21.2% 18.1%

Prime Minister before election

Muhammad Ahmad Mahgoub
Umma Party

Elected Prime Minister

Muhammad Ahmad Mahgoub
Umma Party

Emblem of Sudan.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Sudan
Constitution

Parliamentary elections were held in Sudan between 12 April and 2 May 1968. The election followed the resignation of a third of the members of the Assembly elected in 1965.[1] The result was a victory for the new Democratic Unionist Party, formed by a merger of the National Unionist Party and the People's Democratic Party in December 1967 and led by President Ismail al-Azhari, which won 101 of the 218 seats. Voter turnout was 61.0%.[2]

In contrast, since the last election the Umma Party had fractured, with competing wings being led by Sadiq al-Mahdi and Imam al-Hadi al-Mahdi. Whilst Sadiq's Umma party emerged as the stronger of the two wings, Sadiq actually lost his own seat in the election to a rival from the Imam wing.[3] In total the various Umma party affiliates won some 827,289 votes, or 45.46% of the vote, compared to the 40.8% won by the DUP. The Umma affiliates won only 72 seats, in contrast to the 90 seats won at the previous election.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Democratic Unionist Party 742,226 40.8 101 New
Umma Party-Sadiq 384,986 21.2 36 New
Umma Party-Imam 329,952 18.1 30 New
Independents 70,047 3.9 9 Decrease12
Sudan African National Union 60,493 3.3 15 Increase5
Islamic Charter Front 44,552 2.5 3 Decrease2
Umma Party 43,288 2.4 6 Decrease86
Southern Front 39,822 2.2 10 New
Socialist Front 21,814 1.2 0 New
Socialists 19.690 1.1 0 New
Beja Congress 15,382 0.9 3 Decrease7
National Unionist Party 10,159 0.6 0 New
No political affiliation[4] 8,264 0.5 1 New
Tenants' Union 6,661 0.4 0 New
Workers' Forces 5,204 0.39 1 New
Nuba Mountains Union 3,171 0.2 2 New
Nile Party 2,704 0.2 1 New
Liberal 1,844 0.1 0 New
Islamic 1,772 0.1 0 New
Western Sudan Union 1,695 0.1 0 New
Sudanese Communist Party[4] 1,652 0.1 0 New
Democratic South 1,535 0.1 0 New
Unity 1,478 0.1 0 New
Workers' Federation 668 0.0 0 New
Peace 387 0.0 0 New
Socialist Democrats 220 0.0 0 New
National Unionist Party-Sadiq 63 0.0 0 New
Congress of New Forces 33 0.0 0 New
Invalid/blank votes 43,139
Total 1,862,911 100 218 +11
Registered voters/turnout 3,051,118 61.0
Source: Nohlen et al.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sudan Inter-Parliamentary Union
  2. ^ Nohlen, D, Krennerich, M & Thibaut, B (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, p855 ISBN 0-19-829645-2
  3. ^ Dictionary Of Modern Arab History. Routledge. p. 259. 
  4. ^ a b The Sudanese Communist Party had been banned in 1966, and couldn't formally participate in the election. Two candidates were listed in the official election results as 'Communists'. However, the party general secretary Abdel Khaliq Mahjub was elected from Omdurman South but listed by the Election Commission as having 'no political affiliation'. see ARR: Arab Report and Record. Economic Features, Limited. 1968. p. 144. , Timothy Niblock (25 November 1987). Class and Power in Sudan: The Dynamics of Sudanese Politics, 1898–1985. Palgrave Macmillan UK. p. 230. ISBN 978-1-349-08836-2. , Peter K. Bechtold (1976). Politics in the Sudan: Parliamentary and Military Rule in an Emerging African Nation. Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated. p. 249. ISBN 978-0-275-22730-2. , Robert S. Kramer; Richard Andrew Lobban; Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban (2013). Historical Dictionary of the Sudan. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 39. ISBN 978-0-8108-6180-0.