Sudzal Municipality

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Sudzal
Municipality
Region 3 Centro #071
Region 3 Centro #071
Sudzal is located in Mexico
Sudzal
Sudzal
Location of the Municipality in Mexico
Coordinates: 20°52′11″N 88°59′18″W / 20.86972°N 88.98833°W / 20.86972; -88.98833Coordinates: 20°52′11″N 88°59′18″W / 20.86972°N 88.98833°W / 20.86972; -88.98833
CountryFlag of Mexico.svg Mexico
StateFlag of Yucatan.svg Yucatán
Government
 • TypePRI logo (Mexico).svg 2012–2015[1]
 • Municipal PresidentKithy Janet May Chuc[2]
Area
 • Total436.87 km2 (168.68 sq mi)
 [2]
Elevation[2]6 m (20 ft)
Population (2010[3])
 • Total1,689
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central Standard Time)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (Central Daylight Time)
INEGI Code009
Major AirportMerida (Manuel Crescencio Rejón) International Airport
IATA CodeMID
ICAO CodeMMMD
WebsiteOfficial Website

Sudzal Municipality (In the Yucatec Maya Language: “water where the Suudz tree is”) is one of the 106 municipalities in the Mexican state of Yucatán containing (436.87 km2) of land and located roughly 75 km east of the city of Mérida.[2]

History[edit]

In ancient times, the area was part of the chieftainship of Ah Kin Chel until the conquest. At colonization, Sudzal became part of the encomienda system with Alonso de Rojas recorded as the encomendero in 1576. Later endomenderos were Pablo de Aguilar and Alonso Hernández de Cervera, who was in control of the ecomienda in 1700.[2]

In 1821, Yucatán was declared independent of the Spanish Crown. In 1905, Sudzal belonged to the region headquartered in Izamal. In 1932, the village Sudzal became a free municipality and was separated from Izamal.[2]

Governance[edit]

The municipal president is elected for a term of three years. The president appoints four Councilpersons to serve on the board for three year terms, as the Secretary and councilor of public works, and councilors of schools, potable water and cemeteries, and parks and public gardens.[4]

The Municipal Council administers the business of the municipality. It is responsible for budgeting and expenditures and producing all required reports for all branches of the municipal administration. Annually it determines educational standards for schools.[4]

The Police Commissioners ensure public order and safety. They are tasked with enforcing regulations, distributing materials and administering rulings of general compliance issued by the council.[4]

Communities[edit]

The head of the municipality is Sudzal, Yucatán. There are 13 other population centers, including Chalanté, Chumbec, Hacienda Dcum, Kancabchén de Valencia, Kaua Chen, Finca Kolax, Maben, Majas, Hacienda San Isidro, San José, Tohtol, San Miguel, Hacienda Tzalam. The major population areas are shown below:[2]

Community Population
Entire Municipality (2010) 1,689[3]
Chumbec 237 in 2005[5]
Hacienda Tzalam 124 in 2005[6]
Sudzal 1141 in 2005[7]

Local Festivals[edit]

Every year on 15 August the feast of the Virgin of the Assumption is celebrated.[2]

Tourist Attractions[edit]

  • Church of Our Lady of the Assumption
  • Archeological sites at Acún, Santa Catalina, and Tocbatz
  • Hacienda Chumbec
  • Hacienda San Antonio Chalanté
  • Hacienda San Isidro
  • Hacienda Tzalam

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El PRD llamará a cuentas al alcalde de Seyé". sipse (in Spanish). Milenio Novedades. 22 April 2015. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Municipios de Yucatán » Sudzal" (in Spanish). Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Mexico In Figures: Sudzal , Yucatán". INEGI (in Spanish and English). Aguascalientes, México: Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI). Archived from the original on 6 May 2015. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  4. ^ a b c "Sudzal". inafed (in Spanish). Mérida, Mexico: Enciclopedia de Los Municipios y Delegaciones de México. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Chumbec". PueblosAmerica (in Spanish). PueblosAmerica. 2005. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  6. ^ "Tzalam". PueblosAmerica (in Spanish). PueblosAmerica. 2005. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  7. ^ "Sudzal". PueblosAmerica (in Spanish). PueblosAmerica. 2005. Retrieved 3 June 2015.