Sue Johnson

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Sue Johnson
Born
Academic background
Alma materUniversity of British Columbia
Academic work
InstitutionsInternational Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy
Main interestsBonding, Attachment, Adult Romantic Relationships
Notable ideasEmotionally Focused Therapy

Sue Johnson CM is a Canadian clinical psychologist, couples therapist, and author.[1] She is known for her work in the field of psychology on bonding, attachment and adult romantic relationships.[2]

Career[edit]

Johnson earned a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Hull in 1968, and an Ed.D. in Counselling Psychology from the University of British Columbia in 1984.[3] She currently holds the title of Emeritus Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Ottawa.[3] Along with Les Greenberg, Johnson developed emotionally focused couples and family therapy (EFT), a psychotherapeutic approach for couples based on attachment theory.[4][5] She founded the International Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy, which offers training in EFT to mental health professionals.[6]

Johnson has authored a number of books for therapists (including EFT treatment manuals) and for general audiences.[7]

In 2016, Johnson was named Family Psychologist of the Year by the American Psychological Association's Society for Couple and Family Psychology. In 2017, she was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.[4]

Selected works[edit]

Books
  • Johnson, S.M. (2019) Attachment Theory in Practice: Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) With Individuals, Couples, and Families. New York: Guilford Press
  • Johnson, S.M.; Sanderfer, K. (2016) Created for Connection: The "Hold Me Tight" Guide for Christian Couples. New York: Little Brown
  • Johnson, S.M. (2013) Love Sense: The Revolutionary Science of Romantic Relationships. New York: Little Brown
  • Johnson, S.M. (2008) Hold Me Tight: Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love. New York: Little Brown
  • Johnson, S.M. (2007). Practica de la Terapia Matrimonial Concentrada Emocionalmente: Creando Conexiones New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group – Spanish Edition.
  • Johnson, S.M., Bradley, B., Furrow, J., Lee, A., Palmer, G., Tilley, D. & Woolley, S.(2005) Becoming an Emotionally Focused Therapist: The Workbook. New York: Brunner /Routledge.
  • Johnson, S.M. (2002) Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy with Trauma Survivors: Strengthening Attachment Bonds. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Johnson, S.M. (1996) (2004 -2nd edition). Creating Connection: The Practice of Emotionally Focused Marital Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel (now Brunner /Routledge).
  • Saxe, B. J., Johnson, S.M. et al. (1994) From victim to survivor: A group treatment model for women survivors of incest. Government of Canada: Health Department. Distributed across Canada in French and English, pp. 1–188.
  • Greenberg, L. & Johnson, S.M. (1988) Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples. New York: Guilford Press.
Articles

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fisher, Helen (2014-02-07). "Love in the Time of Neuroscience". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-11-23.
  2. ^ Pattee, Emma (2019-11-20). "How to Have Closer Friendships (and Why You Need Them)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-11-23.
  3. ^ a b "Susan Johnson-Douglas". uOttawa. Retrieved 2019-11-22.
  4. ^ a b "Susan Johnson, C.M., PH.D." The Governor General of Canada. Retrieved 2019-11-22.
  5. ^ Fisher, Helen (2014-02-07). "Love in the Time of Neuroscience". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-11-23.
  6. ^ Bielski, Zosia (2013-12-26). "The power of monogamy: 10 surprising claims regarding modern love". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2019-11-22.
  7. ^ "Dr Johnson's Books". International Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy. Retrieved 2019-11-23.