Sue Singer

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Sue Singer is a British mathematics educator. She is the former headmistress of Guildford High School, a girls' school in Surrey, the former president of the Girls' Schools Association, and the former president of the Mathematical Association.

Career[edit]

Singer married and had children before studying at the university level, and began her university studies in 1971 with a mathematics course at the Open University, in its first class of students. After completing a degree through the Open University, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Education at Garnett College, she became a mathematics teacher at St Paul's Girls' School, and eventually head of mathematics there, before becoming headmistress at Guildford. She retired from Guildford in 2002[1] and later became a recruitment consultant, leading the schools practice at Saxton Bampfylde.[2]

Association leadership[edit]

As president of the Girls' Schools Association, she led calls to replace the General Certificate of Secondary Education examination system by teacher evaluations.[3][4]

Singer was president of the Mathematical Association for the 2005–2006 term.[5] She is an avid sailor, and her presidential address to the Mathematical Association included mathematical problems associated with sailing as examples of the applicability of mathematics to everyday life, a topic that she felt should be emphasized in mathematical teaching.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Singer, Sue, "President's Report", Annual Report 2005–2006 (PDF), Mathematical Association, pp. 1–2
  2. ^ "Guide to executive recruitment agencies and head-hunters in the UK and Ireland (p 83)" (PDF). Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  3. ^ MacLeod, Donald (19 November 2001), "Headteacher calls for scrapping of GCSE exams", The Guardian
  4. ^ Early GCSEs 'not only answer', BBC News, 19 November 2001
  5. ^ Presidents of the Association, Mathematical Association, retrieved 2018-10-06
  6. ^ Singer, Sue (November 2006), "Sailing through Mathematics", The Mathematical Gazette, 90 (519): 385–397, JSTOR 40378185