Sugar Creek Township, Stark County, Ohio

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Sugar Creek Township
Civil township
Emanuel and Frederick Serquet Farmhouse
Location of Sugar Creek Township in Stark County
Location of Sugar Creek Township in Stark County
Coordinates: 40°41′22″N 81°35′32″W / 40.68944°N 81.59222°W / 40.68944; -81.59222Coordinates: 40°41′22″N 81°35′32″W / 40.68944°N 81.59222°W / 40.68944; -81.59222
Country United States
State Ohio
County Stark
Area
 • Total 33.9 sq mi (87.9 km2)
 • Land 33.9 sq mi (87.7 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation[1] 978 ft (298 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 6,740
 • Density 199.0/sq mi (76.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
FIPS code 39-75208[2]
GNIS feature ID 1086990[1]

Sugar Creek Township is one of the seventeen townships of Stark County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 6,740 people in the township, 2,944 of whom lived in the unincorporated portions of the township.[3]

Geography[edit]

Located in the southwestern corner of the county, it borders the following townships:

The most southerly township in the county, it is the only township in the county that borders Holmes County.

Three villages are located in Sugar Creek Township:

Name and history[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 492
1830 1,263 156.7%
1840 1,862 47.4%
1850 1,743 −6.4%
1860 1,800 3.3%
1870 1,779 −1.2%
1880 2,285 28.4%
1890 2,782 21.8%
1900 2,554 −8.2%
1910 3,073 20.3%
1920 3,821 24.3%
1930 4,425 15.8%
1940 4,681 5.8%
1950 5,056 8.0%
1960 5,802 14.8%
1970 6,132 5.7%
1990 6,489
2000 6,740 3.9%
[4]

Named for its Sugar Creek,[5] it is one of five Sugar Creek Townships statewide.[6]

Government[edit]

The township is governed by a three-member board of trustees, who are elected in November of odd-numbered years to a four-year term beginning on the following January 1. Two are elected in the year after the presidential election and one is elected in the year before it. There is also an elected township fiscal officer,[7] who serves a four-year term beginning on April 1 of the year after the election, which is held in November of the year before the presidential election. Vacancies in the fiscal officership or on the board of trustees are filled by the remaining trustees.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ Stark County, Ohio — Population by Places Estimates Ohio State University, 2007. Accessed 15 May 2007.
  4. ^ census data: 1820 : 1820 page 137 , 1830 : Kilbourn, John (1831). The Ohio gazetteer: or, Topographical dictionary: describing the several ... in the State of Ohio. self. p. 332.  , 1840, 1880 : Howe, Henry (1907). Historical Collections of Ohio, The Ohio Centennial Edition. The State of Ohio. p. 285.  , 1850, 1860, 1870 : 1870 page 35 , 1890, 1900 : Hunt, William C. (1901). Population of the United States by states and territories, counties, and minor Civil Divisions, as returned at the Twelfth Census: 1900. United States Census Printing Office. p. 318.  , 1910, 1920, 1930 : 1930 page 56 , 1940, 1950 : 1950 page 21 , 1960, 1970 : 1970 page 135 , 1990 : 1990 , 2000 : 2000
  5. ^ Lehman, John H. (1916). A Standard History of Stark County, Ohio: An Authentic Narrative of the Past, with Particular Attention to the Modern Era in the Commercial, Industrial, Civic and Social Development. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 75. 
  6. ^ "Detailed map of Ohio" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved 2007-02-16. 
  7. ^ §503.24, §505.01, and §507.01 of the Ohio Revised Code. Accessed 4/30/2009.

External links[edit]