Sullington

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Sullington
Sullington St Mary.jpg
Church of St Mary
Sullington is located in West Sussex
Sullington
Sullington
Location within West Sussex
OS grid referenceTQ099131
Civil parish
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
PoliceSussex
FireWest Sussex
AmbulanceSouth East Coast
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
West Sussex
50°54′25″N 0°26′20″W / 50.90685°N 0.43882°W / 50.90685; -0.43882Coordinates: 50°54′25″N 0°26′20″W / 50.90685°N 0.43882°W / 50.90685; -0.43882

Sullington is a village in the Horsham District of West Sussex, England, part of the civil parish of Storrington and Sullington. The village lies on the A283 road west of the A24 road, 20 miles (32 km) south of Horsham.

St Mary's Parish Church nave dates back to Saxon times: the chancel and tower are from the 13th century and the church was restored in 1873. The patronage of the parish rested with the lord of the manor of Sullington until 1938, when Evelyn Palmer (Lady Caldecott) passed it to the Diocese of Chichester. The Victorian rectory (built c1845) was sold off as a private residence and later occupied by the writer A J Cronin and the politician Lady Cynthia Asquith. The modern rectory is on Washington Road.[1]

Sullington Manor, on Sullington Lane, is a Grade II listed former farmhouse. The manor was held by the Shelley family from the dissolution of the monasteries (1546) until 1789, when it was sold to George Wyndham, 3rd Earl of Egremont.[2]

A feature is Sullington Warren, which is a woodland area popular among visitors to Sullington.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sullington: Church Pages 27-29 A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2, Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) Including Horsham. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1986". British History Online.
  2. ^ Baggs, A P. "Sullington: Manors and other estates Pages 20-24 A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2, Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) Including Horsham". British History Online. Retrieved 22 September 2021.

External links[edit]