Sultanate of M'Simbati

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Sultanate of M'Simbati

Flag of
Flag
StatusDefunct (now part of Tanzania)
Official languagesEnglish
Organizational structureAbsolute monarchy
• Sultan
Latham Leslie Moore
Establishment
• Declared
1959
Area claimed
• Total
1.6 km2 (0.62 sq mi)
Membership< 5

The Sultanate of M'Simbati was a now defunct micronation founded in 1959 in Tanganyika by Englishman Latham Leslie Moore, approximately 40 km southeast of Mtwara.[1][2]

Life events of Latham Leslie-Moore[edit]

Latham Leslie-Moore was born in Paddington, London, United Kingdom in 1893,[3] died in 1980 and was buried in the Old Soldiers' Cemetery in Nanyuki, Kenya.[4] During World War I, he served as a second lieutenant and then lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery.[5] Moore purchased the physical property of the sultanate in 1924.[6]

Formation of the nation[edit]

In 1959 the country of Tanganyika was a colony of the United Kingdom— Leslie-Moore purchased an island/ peninsula and corresponded with the colonial governors of the colony declaring his succession and asking for formal recognition of his sultanate. When Tanganyika later merged with the People's Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba to form modern day Tanzania, Leslie-Moore also corresponded with the nation's new president, Julius Nyerere, requesting recognition of his state, as well as to the United Nations. None of these requests was ever honored, however.[7]

Flag[edit]

The flag was loosely based upon other contemporary traditional British Empire flags containing a tricolor of orange, blue and green with a Union flag in the canton.

In popular culture[edit]

Moore and the sultanate were featured in a 1983 book NO MAN'S LAND. The Last of White Africa. By John Heminway.[8]

The Sultanate was also featured in the book Colours of the Fleet, by Malcolm Farrow, OBE, which strived to provide a compendium of all known instances of flags based on British designs.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BROYARD, Anatole (1982-10-29). "Books of The Times". New York Times. New York, NY. Retrieved 2017-03-09. No Man's Land begins, appropriately, with the story of Latham Leslie Moore, an elderly Englishman who, after more than 40 years in Africa, bought an island of 640 acres off the coast of Tanganyika and declared it a sultanate, maintaining that he had seceded from the mainland.
  2. ^ Briggs, Philip; Wildman, Kim (2009). "The South Coast". Tanzania: With Zanzibar, Pemba and Mafia. Bradt Travel Guides. p. 563.
  3. ^ "Latham Leslie Moore". Imperial War Museum. 2014. Retrieved 2017-03-10.
  4. ^ "Find a Grave: Latham Leslie Moore". Find A Grave Memorial# 102418944. 2012. Retrieved 2017-03-10.
  5. ^ "Medal Index Card Transcription". Imperial War Museum. Retrieved 2017-03-10.
  6. ^ Farrow, OBE, Malcolm; Prothero, David (15 Jan 2015). THE COLOURS OF THE FLEET (PDF). London, UK: Flag Institute. p. 120. Retrieved 2017-03-09.
  7. ^ JOhn Bottern (25 November 2005). "Flags of the World Website".
  8. ^ BROYARD, Anatole (1982-10-29). "Books of The Times". New York Times. New York, NY. Retrieved 2017-03-09. No Man's Land begins, appropriately, with the story of Latham Leslie-Moore [sic], an elderly Englishman who, after more than 40 years in Africa, bought an island of 640 acres off the coast of Tanganyika and declared it a sultanate, maintaining that he had seceded from the mainland.
  9. ^ Farrow, OBE, Malcolm; Prothero, David (15 Jan 2015). THE COLOURS OF THE FLEET (PDF). London, UK: Flag Institute. p. 120. Retrieved 2017-03-09.

External links[edit]