Summer Olympic Coins (2000–present)

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In 1951, the government of Finland authorized the striking of the first modern Olympic coin, a 500 Markka. At first, the coins circulated as currency in the issuing country and the mintages were high. In borrowing from the traditions of ancient Greece, the coins were a memento of the 1951 Games, and a coin that numismatists could now add to their collection. With the exception of Canada’s Lucky Loonie program and its 2007 25-cent pieces to commemorate the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games, it is rare that Olympic coins are minted for circulation. Traditionally, Olympic coins are numismatic coins. .[1] However several host countries minted so many coins particularly silver that their value has become just slightly above the value of their metal content. Coins for the 1976 Montreal, 1984 Los Angeles, and 1988 Seoul are generally considered to fall into that category.

Summer Games[edit]

Year Event Number of Coins
1896 1896 Summer Olympics, Athens, Greece None
1900 1900 Summer Olympics, Paris, France None
1904 1904 Summer Olympics, St. Louis, USA None
1908 1908 Summer Olympics, London, England None
1912 1912 Summer Olympics, Stockholm, Sweden None
1920 1920 Summer Olympics, Antwerp, Belgium None
1924 1924 Summer Olympics, Paris, France None
1928 1928 Summer Olympics, Amsterdam, Netherlands None
1932 1932 Summer Olympics, Los Angeles, USA None
1936 1936 Summer Olympics, Berlin, Germany None
1948 1948 Summer Olympics, London, England None
1952 1952 Summer Olympics, Helsinki, Finland 1
1956 1956 Summer Olympics, Melbourne, Australia and Stockholm, Sweden None
1960 1960 Summer Olympics, Rome, Italy None
1964 1964 Summer Olympics, Tokyo, Japan 2
1968 1968 Summer Olympics, Mexico City, Mexico 1
1972 1972 Summer Olympics, Munich, Germany 6
1976 1976 Summer Olympics, Montreal, Canada 30
1980 Summer Olympics, Moscow, Russia 45
1984 1984 Summer Olympics, Los Angeles, USA 6
1988 1988 Summer Olympics, Seoul, Korea 32
1992 1992 Summer Olympics, Barcelona, Spain 30
1996 1996 Summer Olympics, Atlanta, USA 16
2000 2000 Summer Olympics, Sydney, Australia 59
2004 2004 Summer Olympics, Athens, Greece 1
2008 2008 Summer Olympics, Beijing, China 27 [2]
2012 2012 Summer Olympics, London, United Kingdom 33[3]
2016 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 36[4]
2020 2020 Summer Olympics, Tokyo, Japan

2000 Sydney Olympics[edit]

This set has been very popular with collectors, with people still trying to get hold of a complete set. The first coin in this set was sold out at the mint very quickly and it has left a lot of people with incomplete sets.

Olympic Gold Proof Coin Collection[edit]

  • The eight gold coins of the collection depict the athlete's journey from the inspiration of the Games logo, through dedication to the task, preparation for the event and final achievement. The coins have been released progressively from October 1997 to February 2000. The worldwide mintage of gold coins is limited to only 30,000 per design.
  • All the gold coins carry the 'P' mintmark of The Perth Mint and bear the year 2000, making them the first coins of the year 2000. Colour is used on selected gold coin designs - another first for Australian and official Olympic Games coins. Each coin is accompanied by a serial-numbered certificate of authenticity and is presented in a green presentation case.
Denomination Metal Mass Diameter Mint Mark Mintage
A $100 24 kt Gold 10.00 grams 25.00 mm P for Perth Mint 30,000 per design
Year Theme Reverse Design Border of the Coin
1997 Journey Begins Depicts the determination to train in defiance of the elements A border of Olympic flames surrounds the logo.
N/A Dedication I Official logo of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games in colour The border of the coin represents a heart monitor, taking its measure of the athlete's exertions.
N/A Dedication II The third gold coin in the series symbolises the athlete's dedication to attaining peak fitness in the quest for Olympic glory. The pain and effort of a gruelling weights session in the gymnasium are symbolised in the image, which represents the common experience of athletes across a range of Olympic sports. Athletes of various nationalities, both male and female, are personified in the design. The border comprises items of equipment used in training for many Olympic sports, from a loud-hailer used in rowing training, to boxing gloves, a hockey stick and a tennis racquet.
N/A Preparation I Depicts a veteran athletics coach demonstrating shot put technique to aspiring young athletes. Dramatic shades of blue around the border evoke the cold mountainous regions of the world, from which some of the Olympic athletes will come. The ring of mountains links fifteen of the official pictograms, which depict the sports of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games.
N/A Preparation II The central image on the reverse design depicts an athlete and coach working on one of the most crucial aspects of a sprint race - the start. The border comprises 15 of the 34 official pictograms representing the sports and disciplines of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The colour green in the border represents the cultivated and tropical areas from which some of the Olympic competitors will come.
N/A Achievement (Stadium) The central image on the reverse design depicts the Olympic Stadium, the largest outdoor venue in Olympic history. It is the centrepiece of Sydney Olympic Park, and will be the venue for the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. The coins red border comprises 15 of the 34 official pictograms representing the sports and disciplines of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The red colour represents the rugged regions from which many Australian athletes come.
N/A Achievement (Athlete) The presentation of the ultimate athletic prize - an Olympic gold medal - is the central image on the reverse design. The coin’s yellow border comprises 15 of the 34 official pictograms representing the sports and disciplines of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The shades of yellow represent the arid and desert areas from which many of the world’s greatest athletes now come.
N/A Achievement (Torch) The central image of the coin is the Sydney 2000 Olympic torch, which draws its inspiration from the Sydney Opera House, the blue waters of the Pacific Ocean and the curve of the boomerang. The border shows 25 athletes carrying the Olympic flame.

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$5 Silver Proof Coin Collection[edit]

  • The silver coins depict the wider role of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games as a symbol of peace and cultural harmony, and the uniqueness of Australia's environment. The Sydney 2000 Olympic Silver Coin Collection consists of 16 proof quality coins that have been released two at a time between October 1997 and February 2000.
  • One coin in each release reflects the coming together of peoples and ideas in our culturally diverse nation, as expressed in the four great festivals being celebrated in Sydney leading up to the Olympic Games. The other coin highlights the environmental richness of the Australian continent. Each coin bears the mintmark of the Mint producing the coin.
  • The 2000 Olympic Silver set comprises sixteen coins struck in 99.9% pure silver. These coins were designed to represent both Australia's cultural history and environment. The silver set is available in the complete set of sixteen coins, or individually.

Specifications

Denomination Composition Weight Diameter Mintage
A $5 Silver (99.9%) 31.635 grams 40.50 mm 100,000

Coin Details

Artist Reverse Design Border
Nova Peris-Kneebone, and Stuart Devlin The figures in the centre of the design depict two people. The circle around them represents their dreams, the smaller dots their family and friends. The waves symbolise the obstacles they must overcome, while the stars symbolise the notion that the sky is the limit to accomplishment if dreams are backed by dedication. A variety of Australian sea-life - reef fish, stingrays, crocodiles, sea snakes and turtles - make up the elaborate border, together with the Millennium Athlete of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games logo.
N/A The Kangaroos are surrounded by native Xanthorrhoea plants, commonly known as Grasstrees, or by their Aboriginal name - 'Balga' trees. The perimeter of the coin features the inscription: "Commemorating the Olympic Games of the new Millennium in Sydney in the Year 2000 AD. Celebrating the unique animals, birds, fish and flora of Australia and the spirit of the Games of the XXVII Olympiad."
N/A The theme of reconciliation and co-operation is symbolised representing the story of the discovery and settlement of Australia. Sailing ships, which transported the European explorers and colonists, surround the 'Mother Country'. Two human figures and footprints represent Australia's indigenous and non-indigenous population, standing together as one - a symbol of reconciliation and harmony.
N/A The Great White Shark is the focal point of this design. The sharks are surrounded by a border of coral and seaweed found in Australian waters.
N/A This design focuses on Australia's evolution as a multicultural society. The image depicts a central, wise Aboriginal elder, surrounded by Australians of diverse ethnic backgrounds symbolising both the starting point and development of Australian society. The border comprises the ships and aircraft that brought to Australia the immigrants who shaped and enriched the nation's culture and way of life.
N/A The third silver coin in the 'environmental' series features two of Australia's most famous natural treasures - the Frill-necked lizard, in typical aggressive pose. An elaborate border of the flowers, buds and foliage of Sturt's Desert Pea, both found in Australia's tropical north.
N/A 'Reaching the World I' celebrates Australian achievements in commerce, industry and technology. The design incorporates the commercial districts of Melbourne, the distinctive towers and chimneys of a large industrial power station Satellite dishes that link Australia to the world through latest communications technology
N/A 'Emu and Wattle' features two of Australia's most famous flora and fauna. Two adult emus caring for two chicks and a clutch of unhatched eggs are the focus of the design. The emu also features on the Australian Coat of Arms, and is the second tallest of the world's flightless birds, reaching two metres in height. A border of Australia's national flower, the wattle, frames the group.
Stuart Devlin Figures representing ballet, painting, opera, pop music, athletics, golf and soccer radiate out from a map of Australia. They are framed by a border of famous international arts and sports venues at which Australians have performed or had their work shocased. The venues are interspersed with cityscapes from around the world. The venues are (clockwise from bottom left) the Royal Albert Hall, London, the Olympic Sports Halls, Tokyo, the Gugenheim Museum, New York, Wembley Stadium, London, the Metropolitan Opera House, New York and the Palezetto dello Sport, Rome.
Stuart Devlin The Sydney Harbour Bridge, one of Australia’s most famous landmarks, is depicted on the reverse. The border design is based on one of Australia's most beautiful trees, the Red Flowering Gum.
Stuart Devlin One of Australia's most endearing ambassadors, the koala, is the central feature of the reverse design. The border design shows the myriad of vessels - ferries, yachts, cruiseliners and pleasurecraft - that traverse Sydney harbour daily.
Stuart Devlin The platypus, one of Australia's unique creatures, is the central feature of the reverse. The platypus is the inspiration for Syd, one of the three Olympic Games Mascots. A border of Australian water lilies surrounds the design. With violet flowers and broad flat leaves, these plants create a spectacular sight in tropical Australian wetlands.
Stuart Devlin The platypus, one of Australia's most unusual creatures, is the central feature of the reverse. The platypus is the inspiration for Syd, one of the three Olympic Games Mascots. A border of Australian water lilies surrounds the design. With violet flowers and broad flat leaves, these plants create a spectacular sight in tropical Australian wetlands.
Stuart Devlin The Sydney Opera House. The central image is surrounded by a border of historic and modern Sydney city buildings including the AMP Tower, the Sydney Observatory, the Chinese Garden Pagoda, Horby Lighthouse and the Sydney Convention Centre.
N/A The echidna, which features on the reverse of this coin, is one of Australia's most interesting native animals. It is the inspiration for Millie, one of the three Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Mascots. A border of tea tree flowers and leaves surrounds the echidna design. The tea tree is a small paperbark tree with narrow leaves and five-petal flowers. Some species contain an essential oil that is recognised internationally for its antiseptic properties.
N/A The coin depicts Sydney Harbour, looking towards the entrance of the harbour, or 'Heads', from the city. It shows the sea and the land, dominated by the air above. Fort Denison is depicted in the middle of the harbour. The border of the coin shows the diverse weather conditions experienced throughout this vast country. Rain, wind, sun, snow, clouds and clear skies are all represented.
Stuart Devlin The Kookaburra features as the central image of the reverse. The Kookaburra is the inspiration for Olly, one of three Sydney Olympic Games Mascots. A border of the flowers and leaves of the waratah, one of Australia's most spectacular native plants. It has crimson flowers with leathery spiked leaves and is the floral emblem of New South Wales.

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Olympic Kilogram Coin[edit]

At the time, the 1 Kilo Proof coin was the largest Olympic coin released. All 28 sports were depicted on this pure silver (.999%) coin. It was packaged in a Jarrah box, complete with a serial numbered Certificate of Authenticity. With only 20,000 minted, it was a very popular coin.

$5 Bronze Collection[edit]

This release for the Sydney 2000 Bronze Olympic coins has 28 coins in the complete set. Each individual coin displays one of the 28 sports which were played at the games. The coins were sold individually or in a complete set.

Description
Athletics
Aquatics
Modern Pentathlon
Canoe/Kayak
Field Hockey
Basketball
Judo
Triathlon
Archery
Rowing
Boxing
Handball
Gymnastics
Badminton
Fencing
Softball
Sailing
Volleyball
Taekwondo
Football (Soccer)
Weightlifting
Equestrian
Table Tennis
Wrestling
Cycling
Shooting
Baseball
Tennis

Olymphilex Uncirculated Dollar[edit]

The Royal Australian Mint released this coin in commemoration of the Olymphilex exhibition held in Sydney whilst the 2000 Olympic Games were on. The Coin has edged lettering with the word Sydney displayed on it. The coin is available with Canberra and Sydney edged on the coin.

Paralympic Games Victory Silver Dollar Coin[edit]

This Sydney 2000 Paralympic Commemorative coin released by the Royal Australian Mint depicts the medals which were awarded to the winning Paralympians. The coin displays the Paralympic logo and is struck strictly to demand from orders placed before the closing of the Paralympic games. These releases were the IOC's first Victory Medals on legal tender.

Paralympic Games Victory 10oz Silver Proof Coin[edit]

The 10oz coin symbolizes Paralympic remembrance, featuring the design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House as its centrepiece. This coin is struck from 99.9% fine silver in proof quality and is presented in a teak timber case together with a certificate of authenticity. The coin had a mintage of 3,000. .

Paralympic Games Gold, Silver and Bronze Coins[edit]

Gold, Silver and Bronze coins were released to commemorate the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games. The Silver and Bronze coins are legal tender and have a face value of $5.

2004 Athens Olympics[edit]

  • 2 Euro base metal circulating coin
  • 10 Euro Silver
  • 100 Euro Gold
  • 12 Coin Silver Set
  • 6 Coin Gold Set
  • 6 Coin Set (4 Silver, 2 Gold)
Image Country Feature Volume Date
 Greece Summer Olympics in Athens 2004 50 million coins 14 March 2004[7]
Description: The Discobolus (a classical Greek sculpture by Myron) is depicted in the centre of the coin. To the right[8] of it is the logo of the Olympic games (ATHENS 2004) and the five Olympic Rings, while to the left[8] the denomination of the coin in Greek is given (2 ΕΥΡΩ). The twelve stars of the European Union surround the design. The year mark is split around the star in the bottom centre (20*04), and the mint mark is to the upper right[8] of the statue's head.[9]

2008 Beijing Olympics[edit]

1 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Alloy Reverse Diameter Weight Obverse Mintage Series
2007 1 Yuan Brass Weightlifting 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 I series
2007 1 Yuan Brass Swimming 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 I series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Archery 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 II series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Gymnastics 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 II series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Table tennis 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 II series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Fencing 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 III series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Football 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 III series
2008 1 Yuan Brass Modern pentathlon 25 mm 6.75 gr Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, and the year 2008. 10,000,000 III series

10 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Reverse Weight Diameter Fineness Obverse Series
2006 10 Yuan Kite Flying 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2006 10 Yuan Goat Jumping 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2006 10 Yuan Hoop Rolling 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2006 10 Yuan Shuttlecock Kicking 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2007 10 Yuan Traditional Courtyard Residence in Beijing 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2007 10 Yuan Summer Palace 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2007 10 Yuan Great Wall of China 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2007 10 Yuan Tibetan Tower of Beihai Park in Beijing 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2008 10 Yuan Traditional Chinese Peking Opera (with selectively colored mask at the right side) [10] 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series
2008 10 Yuan Yangge Dance (colorized image on the right)[10] 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series
2008 10 Yuan Chinese Lion Dance (folk art of Shadowgraph on the right) [10] 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series
2008 10 Yuan Beijing Tea Stall (image from the Spring Festival at the right)[10] 1 Troy Ounce 40 mm .999 Silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series

150 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Reverse Weight Diameter Fineness Obverse Series
2006 150 Yuan Equestrian .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2006 150 Yuan Archery .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. I series
2007 150 Yuan Weightlifting .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2007 150 Yuan Swimming .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series
2008 150 Yuan Chinese Cuju Sport [11] .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series
2008 150 Yuan Wrestling [11] .33 Troy Ounce 23 mm .9999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad, traditional paired Chinese dragon, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series

300 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Reverse Weight Diameter Fineness Obverse Series Mintage
2007 300 Yuan Dragon boat racing 1 kilogram 100 mm .999 silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad in color, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series 20,008
2008 300 Yuan Tug of war [11] 1 kilogram 100 mm .999 silver Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad in color, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. III series 20,008

2,000 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Reverse Weight Diameter Fineness Obverse Series Mintage
2007 2,000 Yuan Martial Art 5 Troy Ounce 60 mm .999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad in color, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series 2,008
2008 2,000 Yuan Modern Sports 5 Troy Ounce 60 mm .999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad in color, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. II series 2,008

100,000 Yuan[edit]

Year Denomination Reverse Weight Diameter Fineness Obverse Mintage
2008 100,000 Yuan Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests with a group of athletes engaged in numerous sports [12] 10 kilograms 18 cm .999 Gold Emblem of the XXIX Olympiad in color, name of People’s Republic of China and the year 2008. 29

2007[edit]

  • Four Proof 1-ounce .999 silver 10-yuan coins (to be determined)
  • Two Proof third-ounce .9999 fine gold 150-yuan coins (to be determined)
  • Five ounce Gold Coin
  • One kilogram Silver Coin
  • Two circulation coins (to be determined)

[2]

2008[edit]

  • Five ounce Gold Coin
  • One kilogram Silver Coin
  • Two circulation coins (to be determined)

[2]

2012 London Olympics[edit]

2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics[edit]

Euro coins[edit]

Several countries in the eurozone are minting high value euro collectors' coin celebrating this occasion, like the recent 2008 Olympic Games commemorative coin, minted in June 2008. The obverse carries on the right side a symbol of the Belgian Olympic Committee, in the center an analog of the Olympic flambeau, which will constantly burn during the Olympic Games, and on the left side symbols of the Olympic disciplines: cycling, hockey, athletics and tennis can be seen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coins of the Modern Olympic Games, Volume 1, Michele Menard, page 8, ISBN 1-895321-00-X
  2. ^ a b c "USOC selects distributors for Beijing Games coinage", Jeff Starek, Coin World, June 25, 2007, p. 110
  3. ^ "London 2012 Olympic 50p coins go into circulation". BBC News. 12 October 2010. 
  4. ^ https://www.rio2016.com/en/news/new-batches-of-rio-2016-commemorative-coins-and-postal-stamps-launched
  5. ^ Chinagoldcoin.net
  6. ^ Chinagoldcoin.net
  7. ^ "The Euro — €2 Commemorative Design 2004 — Greece". 2007-04-07. Retrieved 2007-04-07. 
  8. ^ a b c In heraldry, directions are often described as they would appear to the bearer of a coat of arms, rather than as they would appear to the viewer. Therefore, the following descriptions will use "facing to the left" when it would appear to the layman that the person depicted is facing to the right.
  9. ^ "OJ 2004/C 91/06" (PDF). Official Journal of the European Union. 15 April 2004. 
  10. ^ a b c d China issues final 2008 Beijing Olympic commemoratives, Coin World, March 10, 2008, Vol. 49, Issue 2500, p. 68
  11. ^ a b c China issues final 2008 Beijing Olympic commemoratives, Coin World, March 10, 2008, Vol. 49, Issue 2500, p. 69
  12. ^ China issues final 2008 Beijing Olympic commemoratives, Coin World, March 10, 2008, Vol. 49, Issue 2500, p. 70