Summertime (Paul Desmond album)

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Summertime
Summertime (Paul Desmond album).jpg
Studio album by Paul Desmond
Released March/April 1969[1]
Recorded October 10, 16 & 24, 1968
November 5 & 20, 1968
December 26, 1968
Studio Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Genre Jazz, bossa nova
Length 40:05
Label A&M/CTI
SP 3015
Producer Creed Taylor
Paul Desmond chronology
Easy Living
(1966)Easy Living1966
Summertime
(1968)
From the Hot Afternoon
(1969)From the Hot Afternoon1969

Summertime is an album by American jazz saxophonist Paul Desmond featuring performances recorded in 1968 and released on the CTI label.[2][3][4]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic4.5/5 stars[5]

Allmusic reviewer Richard S. Ginell states "The result is a beautifully produced, eclectic album of music that revives Desmond's "bossa antigua" idea and sends it in different directions, directly toward Brazil and various Caribbean regions, as well as back to the jazzy States... Never before had Desmond's alto been recorded so ravishingly".[5]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Samba (Struttin') With Some Barbeque" (Lil Hardin Armstrong, Don Raye) - 4:26
  2. "Olvidar" (Don Sebesky) - 5:33
  3. "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" (John Lennon, Paul McCartney) - 2:12
  4. "Emily" (Johnny Mandel, Johnny Mercer) - 4:45
  5. "Someday My Prince Will Come" (Morey, Frank Churchill) - 3:07
  6. "Autumn Leaves" (Joseph Kosma, Johnny Mercer) - 3:00
  7. "Where Is Love?" (Lionel Bart) - 5:30
  8. "Lady in Cement" (Hugo Montenegro) - 3:08
  9. "North by Northeast" (Paul Desmond) - 4:30
  10. "Summertime" (George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) - 3:54
  • Recorded at Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on October 10 (tracks 7 & 10), October 16 (tracks 4 & 9), October 24 (tracks 2 & 5), November 5 (track 8), November 20 (tracks 1 & 6), and December 26 (track 3), 1968.

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Billboard Apr 26, 1969
  2. ^ CTI Records discography accessed February 10, 2012
  3. ^ Paul Desmond Catalog accessed February 29, 2016
  4. ^ Paul Desmond Discography Part Three: 1960-1969 Archived 2016-03-24 at the Wayback Machine. accessed February 29, 2016
  5. ^ a b Ginell, R. S. Allmusic Review accessed February 10, 2012