Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District

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Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District
184 Gibbs Street, Newton Centre MA.jpg
184 Gibbs Street
Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District is located in Massachusetts
Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District
Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District is located in the US
Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District
Location Roughly Sumner St. between Willow St. and Cotswold Terr. and 184 Gibbs St., Newton, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°20′0″N 71°11′32″W / 42.33333°N 71.19222°W / 42.33333; -71.19222Coordinates: 42°20′0″N 71°11′32″W / 42.33333°N 71.19222°W / 42.33333; -71.19222
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Second Empire, Queen Anne
MPS Newton MRA
NRHP Reference # 86001762[1]
Added to NRHP September 04, 1986

The Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District is a residential historic district encompassing a cohesive collection of houses representing the styles commonly built in the Newton Centre area of Newton, Massachusetts during its first period of growth. The houses are located along Summer Street, between Cotswold Terrace and Willow Street, as well as the adjacent house at 184 Gibbs Street. The houses were built between 1865 and 1899, and are predominantly Queen Anne and Colonial Revival in styling. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.[1]

Description and history[edit]

Summer Street is a residential street running north-south between Willow and Ward Streets in central Newton, just north of the main village of Newton Centre. This district encompasses roughly the southern third of the street, as well as a single house west of Summer on Gibbs Street, which bisects the district. Development of this area was spurred by the improvement of rail service in Newton brought by the introduction of the Circuit Railroad in 1886, and further intensified by the construction of Commonwealth Avenue, crosses Summer Street north of the district.[2]

The district contains sixteen houses built between 1865 and 1899. The oldest house in the district is 184 Gibbs Street, a high-quality example Second Empire architecture. 166 Summer Street is an Italianate house built in 1870. Six houses are Queen Anne in style, the most of any individual style. There are three Colonial Revival houses, and one Shingle style house with Colonial Revival features. There is one Georgian Revival house, and two that are Second Empire (the 1867 house at 139 Summer Street joining 184 Gibbs Street in this category.)[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "NRHP nomination for Sumner and Gibbs Streets Historic District". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-04-21.