Super Cassette Vision

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Super Cassette Vision
Super-Cassette-Vision-Console-L.jpg
The Super Cassette Vision
Manufacturer Epoch Co.
Type Home video game console
Generation Third generation
Release date
  • JP: July 17, 1984
Introductory price ¥14,800
Units sold 400,000
Media ROM cartridge
CPU 8-bit NEC PD7801G
Memory 128 bytes RAM, 4kB VRAM
Graphics 309×246 resolution, 16 colors, 128 on-screen sprites
Sound PD1771C @ 6 MHz
Predecessor Cassette Vision

The Super Cassette Vision (Japanese: スーパーカセットビジョン, Hepburn: Suupaa Kasetto Bijon) is a home video game console made by Epoch Co. and released in Japan on July 17, 1984, and in Europe, specifically France, later in 1984. A successor to the Cassette Vision, it is a third-generation console that competed with the Nintendo Famicom and Sega SG-1000 in Japan.

History[edit]

Epoch's original Cassette Vision was introduced in Japan by Epoch in 1981, which had steady sales and took over 70% of the Japanese home console market at the time, with around 400,000 units sold.[1] However, the introduction of next-generation systems from Nintendo, Casio and Sega quickly pushed back the original Cassette Vision, leading Epoch to quickly develop a successor. The Super Cassette Vision was released in 1984, featuring an 8-bit processor and better performance more in line with its competitors. It was later released in France by ITMC under the Yeno branding.[2] At least 16 games were brought over from Japan for a European release.[3] A version of the system targeted the young female market, the Super Lady Cassette Vision. The console came packed in a pink carrying case, alongside the game Milky Princess.[4] The system did not take off, and was unable to match the massive popularity of the Nintendo Famicom, leading Epoch to drop out of the console market by 1987.

Technical specifications[edit]

The motherboard and keypad of the Super Cassette Vision.
  • CPU: 8-bit NEC PD7801G microcontroller[5]
  • RAM: 128 bytes (internal to CPU)
  • ROM: 4 KB (internal to CPU)
  • Video processor: EPOCH TV-1
  • VRAM: 4 KB (2 × µPD4016C-2) + 2 KB (EPOCH TV-1 internal)
  • Colors: 16
  • Sprites: 128
  • Display: 309×246
  • Sound processor: PD1771C @ 6 MHz
  • Sound: 1 channel (tone, noise or 1-bit PCM)
  • Controllers: 2 × hard-wired joysticks

Games[edit]

  • (1) Astro Wars - Invaders from Space
  • (2) Astro Wars II - Battle in Galaxy
  • (3) Super Golf
  • (4) Super Mahjong
  • (5) Super Base Ball
  • (6) Punch Boy
  • (7) Elevator Fight
  • (8) Lupin III
  • (9) Nebula
  • (10) Wheelie Racer
  • (11) Boulder Dash
  • (12) Miner 2049er
  • (13) Super Soccer
  • (14) Comic Circus
  • (15) Milky Princess
  • (16) Pop and Chips
  • (17) Nekketsu Kung-Fu Road
  • (18) Star Speeder
  • (19) TonTon Ball
  • (20) Super Sansu-Puter
  • (21) Shogi Nyuumon
  • (22) Doraemon
  • (23) BASIC Nyuumon (included four basic games)
  • (24) Dragon Slayer
  • (25) Rantou Pro-Wrestling
  • (26) WaiWai(Y2) Monster Land
  • (27) Dragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō
  • (28) Mappy
  • (29) Sky Kid
  • (30) Pole Position II

Unreleased games[edit]

  • Black Hole
  • Super Derby
  • Super Rugby

.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "株式会社 エポツク杜 堀江正幸氏 (pg. 9)" (in Japanese). 1998. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  2. ^ "Ma collection YENO & EPOCH Super Cassette Vision" (in French). Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  3. ^ Shiver (2004). "YENO Super Cassette Vision" (in French). Internet Services. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  4. ^ "Epoch Super Cassette Vision: Models & Clones". Video Game Console Library. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  5. ^ "Epoch Super Cassette Vision: Specs & Manuals". Video Game Console Library. Retrieved August 29, 2017.