Supercarrier (TV series)

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Supercarrier
Created by Stanford Whitmore
Steven E. deSouza
Based on Supercarrier by George C. Wilson
Written by Steven E. deSouza
Stanford Whitmore
Joel Wilf
Michael Part
Directed by William A. Graham
Corey Allen
Jackie Cooper
Peter Crane
Theme music composer Craig Safan
Mark Mueller
Opening theme "Living on the Edge"[1]
Composer(s) Jack Eskew (pilot ep.)
Craig Safan
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 8
Production
Executive producer(s) Steven E. deSouza
Producer(s) Chuck Bowman
Cinematography Jack Beckett
Robert Steadman
Frank Raymond
Editor(s) Ronald J. Fagan
Gregory F. Plotts
Noel Rogers
Running time 60 minutes
Production company(s) Richard Maynard Productions
Real Tinsel Productions
Fries Entertainment
Release
Original release March 6 – May 14, 1988 [2]

Supercarrier is an American military drama television series that aired on ABC from March 6 until May 14, 1988. It features US Navy Pilots aboard the fictional aircraft carrier USS Georgetown. It suffered from low ratings against CBS's Murder, She Wrote and NBC's Family Ties, and only lasted eight episodes before being cancelled.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The series was partly filmed on board the USS Vandegrift (FFG-48) which is an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate rather than an aircraft carrier.[3] Part of the filming was conducted on the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), between September and November 1987, while the ship was undergoing a period of upkeep.[4]

The Department of the Navy pulled its support for the show in March 1988, with a spokesperson citing dissatisfaction with the plots of upcoming episodes which the carrier 'just becomes a backdrop' for stories unrelated to the U.S. Navy.[5] The producer, Charles Fries, said in response that the Navy 'wanted a sleepy show about life on a Supercarrier' and that he was 'happy to be relieved of the cooperation because naval personnel were stifling our writers relationships and dialogue'.[6]

Episodes[edit]

No Title Directed by Written by Original air date
1 "Deadly Enemies" TBA TBA March 6, 1988 (1988-03-06)
In the series pilot, the search for a downed jet fighter focuses attention on a hot-dogging flyer (Alex Hyde-White) and brings on the arrival of female forces.
2 "All in the Game" Jackie Cooper Joel M. Wilf March 13, 1988 (1988-03-13)
War games bring out the best and the worst: Rosie becomes an unlikely heroine, while tension escalates between pilots BeeBee and Sierra.
3 "Common Ground" TBA TBA March 20, 1988 (1988-03-20)
Anzac and Sierra get an unexpectedly friendly salute from a defecting Soviet pilot, flying a high-tech MiG 28 stealth fighter plane that both sides are after.
4 "Ring of Fire" Peter Crane Michael Part March 27, 1988 (1988-03-27)
Family duties may upset Sierra, and sink Cruz's Navy and boxing careers as he battles to keep his sister out of the gangs.
5 "Rest and Revolution" Peter Crane Jim Trombetta April 10, 1988 (1988-04-10)
BeeBee, Sierra and Anzac are staying in a small Latin nation of Val Verde training its fighter pilots, and while they're on liberty, the revolution starts without them.
6 "Give Me Liberty" TBA TBA April 17, 1988 (1988-04-17)
Anzac and Sierra hook up with attractive but deadly arms dealers; Rivers tangles with a lawyer; Coleman's wife undergoes surgery for a lump in her breast
7 "Exodus" TBA TBA April 24, 1988 (1988-04-24)
Madigan evacuates China Sea villagers from impending war; and Willoughby befriends a pregnant refugee.
8 "Vector" TBA TBA May 17, 1988 (1988-05-17)
Anzac succumbs to the charms of a sassy Aussie woman, rescued from a disabled research vessel, while a mysterious plague caused by poison from a crate of Nazi gold sweeps the George.

|- |01 ||Deadly Enemies (Pilot) ||March 6, 1988 ||In the series pilot, the search for a downed jet fighter focuses attention on a hot-dogging flyer (Alex Hyde-White) and brings on the arrival of female forces.[7] |- |02 ||All in the Game ||March 13, 1988 ||War games bring out the best and the worst: Rosie becomes an unlikely heroine, while tension escalates between pilots BeeBee and Sierra.[8] |- |03 ||Common Ground ||March 20, 1988 ||Anzac and Sierra get an unexpectedly friendly salute from a defecting Soviet pilot, flying a high-tech MiG 28 stealth fighter plane that both sides are after.[9] |- |04 ||Ring of Fire ||March 27, 1988 ||Family duties may upset Sierra, and sink Cruz's Navy and boxing careers as he battles to keep his sister out of the gangs.[10] |- |05 ||Rest and Revolution ||10 April 1988 ||BeeBee, Sierra and Anzac are staying in a small Latin nation of Val Verde training its fighter pilots, and while they're on liberty, the revolution starts without them.[11] |- |06 ||Give Me Liberty ||17 April 1988 ||Anzac and Sierra hook up with attractive but deadly arms dealers; Rivers tangles with a lawyer; Coleman's wife undergoes surgery for a lump in her breast.[12] |- |07 ||Exodus ||24 April 1988 ||Madigan evacuates China Sea villagers from impending war; and Willoughby befriends a pregnant refugee.[13] |- |08 ||Vector ||14 May 1988 ||Anzac succumbs to the charms of a sassy Aussie woman, rescued from a disabled research vessel, while a mysterious plague caused by poison from a crate of Nazi gold sweeps the George.[14] |}

References[edit]

External links[edit]