Superior rectus muscle

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Superior rectus
Eye movements elevators.jpg
View of the eye from above, showing the action of the superior rectus muscle.
Details
Originannulus of Zinn at the orbital apex
Insertion7.5 mm superior to the limbus
Nerveoculomotor nerve
Actionselevates, intorsion, and rotates medially the eye
Identifiers
Latinmusculus rectus superior bulbi
TAA15.2.07.010
FMA49035
Anatomical terms of muscle

The superior rectus muscle is a muscle in the orbit. It is one of the extraocular muscles. It is innervated by the superior division of the oculomotor nerve (Cranial Nerve III). In the primary position (looking straight ahead), the superior rectus muscle's primary function is elevation, although it also contributes to intorsion and adduction.

Lacrimal nerveTrochlear nerveTrochlear nerveTrochlear nerveAbducens nerveAbducens nerveOculomotor nerveOculomotor nerveSupraorbital nerveSupratrochlear nerveSupratrochlear nerveOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryOphthalmic arteryMaxillary nerveMandibular nerveTrigeminal nerveTrochlear nerveTrochlear nerveTrochlear nerveTrochlear nerveOphthalmic nerveLacrimal nerveFrontal nervePupilIrisCorneaLimbusSuperior rectus muscleSuperior oblique muscleSuperior oblique muscleSuperior oblique muscleSuperior oblique muscleSuperior oblique muscleTrochlea of superior obliqueLevator palpebrae superior muscleLateral rectus muscleLateral rectus muscleLateral rectus muscleLateral rectus muscleMedial rectus muscleMedial rectus muscleOptic nerveTrigeminal ganglion
The superior rectus muscles is shown in this image of the right eye from above. Hover the mouse over the structures for their names. Click for more information.

Structure[edit]

Function[edit]

It elevates, adducts, and helps intort (rotate medially) the eye.

Clinical significance[edit]

Testing[edit]

The superior rectus muscle is the only muscle that is capable of elevating the eye when it is in a fully abducted position.[1]

Additional images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Eye Theory". Cim.ucdavis.edu. Retrieved 2012-12-02.

External links[edit]