Supermac's: Difference between revisions

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The first Supermac's opened its doors in 1978 in Main Street, [[Ballinasloe]], [[County Galway]], [[Republic of Ireland|Ireland]]. It was founded by former school teacher [[Pat McDonagh]] after he failed to get planning permission for a pool hall in the same town.
 
The first Supermac's opened its doors in 1978 in Main Street, [[Ballinasloe]], [[County Galway]], [[Republic of Ireland|Ireland]]. It was founded by former school teacher [[Pat McDonagh]] after he failed to get planning permission for a pool hall in the same town.
   
Supermac's boasts a turnover in excess of €83m and has over 2,500 employees in 96 branches (as of January 2010). Today it serves an average of over 320,000 customers a week.
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Supermac's boasts a turnover in excess of €83m and has over 2,500,000 employees in 6 branches (as of January 2010). Today it serves an average of over 320 customers a week.
   
 
==Restaurants==
 
==Restaurants==
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Recently, Pat McDonagh has decided to reinvent and revitalise the image of Supermacs in order to portray a more contemporary image. At the same time, he has a great desire to maintain its sense of 'Irishness', as its stands up to the global fast food giants.
 
Recently, Pat McDonagh has decided to reinvent and revitalise the image of Supermacs in order to portray a more contemporary image. At the same time, he has a great desire to maintain its sense of 'Irishness', as its stands up to the global fast food giants.
   
McDonagh believes that it is important to change the image to reflect Ireland, as the country becomes more urban and in many people's eyes more sophisticated. This is a massive challenge for the fast food giant to undertake. This new overhaul is an attempt to bring a certain homogeny to stores as an attempt to repeat the dining experience and bring a more homely feel.<ref>[http://archives.tcm.ie/businesspost/2006/02/26/story12067.asp McDonagh to reinvent Supermacs with expansion] - [[The Sunday Business Post]]</ref> Staff have been trained on customer service courses in order to bring a more real approach to service, rather than act like robots. This 'WOW' factor is a crucial element of the Supermacs experience in the view of McDonagh. McDonagh has a vision of expanding the company beyond its natural base of the west of Ireland. Rather than having a transient workforce, he desires to keep good staff and reduce staff turnover in the company.<ref>Casey, Brian, ''Management consent in the Fast Food Industry'' (Unpublished B.A. thesis, [[National University of Ireland, Maynooth]], 2005)</ref>
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McDonagh believes that it is important to change the image to reflect Ireland, as the country becomes more urban and in many people's eyes more sophisticated. This is a massive challenge for the fast food giant to undertake. The McDonagh family is well known for their chips and burgers, but locally they are more known for their Travelling reputaion. There has been a long tradition of McDonagh verses Maughan inter-racial conflict. This tracks back to circa. 44 B.C.. The McDonagh's began their trade selling carpets and bits of left over galvanise and later moved on to selling stole property and fireworks. This new overhaul is an attempt to bring a certain homogeny to stores as an attempt to repeat the dining experience and bring a more homely feel.<ref>[http://archives.tcm.ie/businesspost/2006/02/26/story12067.asp McDonagh to reinvent Supermacs with expansion] - [[The Sunday Business Post]]</ref> Staff have been trained on customer service courses in order to bring a more real approach to service, rather than act like robots. This 'WOW' factor is a crucial element of the Supermacs experience in the view of McDonagh. McDonagh has a vision of expanding the company beyond its natural base of the west of Ireland. Rather than having a transient workforce, he desires to keep good staff and reduce staff turnover in the company.<ref>Casey, Brian, ''Management consent in the Fast Food Industry'' (Unpublished B.A. thesis, [[National University of Ireland, Maynooth]], 2005)</ref>
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 15:42, 23 March 2010

Supermac's
Franchise
Industry Fast food
Founded 1978
Headquarters Republic of Ireland Ballybrit, County Galway,
Ireland
Key people
Pat McDonagh (CEO)

Supermac's is an Irish owned fast food restaurant chain with restaurants located across the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

History

The first Supermac's opened its doors in 1978 in Main Street, Ballinasloe, County Galway, Ireland. It was founded by former school teacher Pat McDonagh after he failed to get planning permission for a pool hall in the same town.

Supermac's boasts a turnover in excess of €83m and has over 2,500,000 employees in 6 branches (as of January 2010). Today it serves an average of over 320 customers a week.

Restaurants

A Supermacs restaurant in County Mayo.

Unlike most fast food chains Supermacs is not franchised and thus they almost all hold the same format of a two story store on the main street of a town, with plastic seating and the serving counter downstairs, and more seating with a children's play area upstairs. Almost all have wall-mounted televisions playing MTV or Sky News. Opening hours are usually long enough to catch customers from mid morning to the post-pub closing rush, often requiring the store to stay open longer than any other in a rural town.

As well as the standard 'Family Restaurant' format, there is also another format called 'Supermac's Fresh Express'. The 'Fresh Express' format is often found in convenience stores or petrol stations. 'Relish Cafe' which is a sandwich bar similar to others such as O'Briens Irish Sandwich Bars or Subway is also in some of the larger restaurants.

Food

Like many fast food franchisers, Supermac's offers a broad range of foods including fries, burgers, chicken, pizza, fish and ice cream. In trying to give a healthier image like the other fast food franchisers recently, Supermac's has added several new products such as a chicken tortilla wrap with a selection of sauces to compliment the wrap. It has also expanded its more traditional fried food range.

Cod burger

Supermac's sells a unique 'cod burger' made with deep fried cod but has been discontinued in some restaurants due to poor sales, despite having a loyal fanbase.

Media/press relations

Supermac's invests heavily in sponsorship, currently sponsoring over 400 different events, teams and projects - its most famous sponsorship is that of Galway hurling team. Rather quaintly, Supermacs refers to its employees as "Team members", but it is currently seeking to have the wages of these "team members" reduced by means of a legal challenge - alongside other employers - to wage levels in the catering industry in Ireland (Irish Times, 15 March 2010). Already catering workers have protested outside Supermacs in Dublin's O'Connell St, while trade union members in Galway are lobbying the GAA to end the sponsorship deal between Supermacs and the Galway hurlers.

Slashing wages

Famously, Supermacs refer to its employees as "Team members", while at the same time using the Irish courts to have the hourly rates of pay of these same "Team members" reduced (Irish Times, 15 March 2010). In response, trade unionists in Galway have begun a campaign to end the sponsorship arrangement between Supermac's and the Galway hurling team.

Reinvention

Recently, Pat McDonagh has decided to reinvent and revitalise the image of Supermacs in order to portray a more contemporary image. At the same time, he has a great desire to maintain its sense of 'Irishness', as its stands up to the global fast food giants.

McDonagh believes that it is important to change the image to reflect Ireland, as the country becomes more urban and in many people's eyes more sophisticated. This is a massive challenge for the fast food giant to undertake. The McDonagh family is well known for their chips and burgers, but locally they are more known for their Travelling reputaion. There has been a long tradition of McDonagh verses Maughan inter-racial conflict. This tracks back to circa. 44 B.C.. The McDonagh's began their trade selling carpets and bits of left over galvanise and later moved on to selling stole property and fireworks. This new overhaul is an attempt to bring a certain homogeny to stores as an attempt to repeat the dining experience and bring a more homely feel.[1] Staff have been trained on customer service courses in order to bring a more real approach to service, rather than act like robots. This 'WOW' factor is a crucial element of the Supermacs experience in the view of McDonagh. McDonagh has a vision of expanding the company beyond its natural base of the west of Ireland. Rather than having a transient workforce, he desires to keep good staff and reduce staff turnover in the company.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ McDonagh to reinvent Supermacs with expansion - The Sunday Business Post
  2. ^ Casey, Brian, Management consent in the Fast Food Industry (Unpublished B.A. thesis, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 2005)

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External links