Surrey Central station

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Surrey Central
Translinkexpo.svg
SkyTrain station
Surrey Central station, September 2011.jpg
Location 10277 135 Street, Surrey, BC
Coordinates 49°11′22″N 122°50′52″W / 49.189473°N 122.847871°W / 49.189473; -122.847871Coordinates: 49°11′22″N 122°50′52″W / 49.189473°N 122.847871°W / 49.189473; -122.847871
Owned by BC Transit, TransLink
Platforms Centre platform
Tracks 2
Connections Translinkbus.svg 96 B-Line
Construction
Structure type Elevated
Disabled access Yes
Other information
Station code SC
Fare zone 3
History
Opened March 28, 1994
Traffic
Passengers (2011[1]) 31,471
Services
Preceding station   TransLink   Following station
toward Waterfront
Expo Line
Surrey
Terminus

Surrey Central station is located on an elevated portion of the Expo Line, a part of Metro Vancouver's SkyTrain rapid transit system. It is located in downtown Surrey, British Columbia, just east of the North Surrey Recreation Centre and near to the Central City Shopping Centre, the Surrey campus of Simon Fraser University, and Surrey City Hall.

Surrey Central is the busiest of the four stations located within Surrey, with a daily average ridership of approximately 31,500 on a typical weekday.[2]

History[edit]

The Surrey Centre Library and City Hall are adjacent to the station

Surrey Central station was one of three new stations opened on March 28, 1994 when the Expo Line was extended into downtown Surrey. The name "Surrey Central" was given after an ad was placed in the local paper calling on residents to propose an appropriate name. Winners received a City of Surrey mug, a letter of thanks, and a T-shirt with a vision of Surrey on the front of it.[citation needed] Previous to the SkyTrain expansion, "Surrey Central" was a bus loop known as "Whalley Exchange" as the immediate area is historically known as "Whalley".

Over the years, the area has earned a reputation for being unsafe and a magnet for crime, including violence and drug trafficking. Officers from both the South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority Police Service, and Transit Security Department can be found patrolling the bus loop and SkyTrain platform in an effort to reduce crime and disorder. Surrey RCMP also make occasional patrols of the station.[citation needed]

In an effort to combat the station's rundown image, and to show off experimental urban design, the City of Surrey and TransLink agreed to have Surrey Central Station participate in the GVTA's Urban Transit Village program. The Transit Villages are defined by TransLink as "a new approach to station design and access." While the original schedule called for construction to be completed by Spring of 2007, nothing beyond design plans have been completed. The Surrey Central plan specifically called for improvements in four areas: station access, street design, King George Boulevard, and land use.[citation needed]

Services[edit]

Surrey Central station is a transfer point for twenty-one TransLink bus routes that serve Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Ladner, Tsawwassen, and Langley, the highest number of bus route connections at any station in the SkyTrain network.

Bus routes[edit]

Bus bay assignments[3]
Bay Number Bus Route(s)
1 Unloading
2 320 Langley Centre/Fleetwood
3 335 Newton Exchange
4 501 Langley Centre

509 Walnut Grove

N19 Downtown NightBus

5 323 Newton Exchange

393 Newton Exchange

5A 337 Fraser Heights
6 C71 Scott Road Station

C73 Guildford

7 324 Newton Exchange

325 Newton Exchange

8 316 Scottsdale

326 Guildford

9 503 Aldergrove

321 New Westminster Station (Sunday and Holiday service only AM)

10 321 Newton Exchange/White Rock Centre/White Rock South
11 96 Newton Exchange (B-Line)
12 502 Langley Centre
13 96 Guildford Exchange (B-Line)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2011 SkyTrain Station Counts". TransLink. Retrieved August 10, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Fall 2011 Expo, Millennium and Canada Line Station Counts Program". TransLink. Retrieved November 26, 2016. 
  3. ^ Map of Surrey Central Station | Retrieved February 25, 2016