Surrey Wildlife Trust

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Surrey Wildlife Trust (SWT) was founded in 1959 as Surrey Naturalists' Trust and it is one of forty-six wildlife trusts covering Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and Alderney. In 2002 it took over Surrey County Council's large countryside estate. As of 2018 the SWT manages more than 7,000 hectares (17,000 acres) of land for wildlife and employs more than 100 staff. It had an income of £5.4 million and expenditure of £5.3 million.[1]

As of July 2019 the SWT manages seventy-seven nature reserves.[2][a] Thirty-five are Sites of Special Scientific Interest, nine are Special Protection Areas, eight are Special Areas of Conservation, one is a National Nature Reserve, fourteen are Local Nature Reserves, four are Nature Conservation Review sites, two are Geological Conservation Reviews, seven include Scheduled Monuments and two are listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest.

Surrey is a county in South East England. It has an area of 642 square miles (1,660 square kilometres)[7] and an estimated population of 1.19 million as of 2017.[8] It is bordered by Greater London, Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire and Berkshire. Its top level of government is provided by Surrey County Council and the lower level by eleven boroughs and districts, Elmbridge, Epsom and Ewell, Guildford, Mole Valley, Reigate and Banstead, Runnymede, Spelthorne, Surrey Heath, Tandridge, Waverley and Woking.[9]

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Sites[edit]

Site Photograph Area[b] Location[b] Public access Classifications Description
Ash Ranges[10] Ash Ranges 1,392 hectares
(3,440 acres)
Pirbright
51°16′05″N 0°39′36″W / 51.268°N 0.660°W / 51.268; -0.660 (Ash Ranges)
SU936529
PL SPA,[11] SSSI[12] This large area of dry heath provides a habitat for many rare plants, inverebrates and reptiles. There are flora such as bell heather, early-purple orchid and the carnivorous round-leaved sundew, and heath tiger and green tiger beetles, while birds include nightjars, woodlarks and Dartford warblers.[10]
Ashtead Park[13] Ashtead Park 24 hectares
(59 acres)
Ashtead
51°18′54″N 0°17′28″W / 51.315°N 0.291°W / 51.315; -0.291 (Ashtead Park)
TQ192587
YES LNR,[14] RHPG[15] The nature reserve was formerly part of the park of Ashtead House. It is mainly woodland on heavy London Clay and it has two ponds. Fauna include the broad-bodied chaser and emperor dragonflies and common blue damselfly.[13]
Barossa[16] Barossa 498 hectares
(1,230 acres)
Camberley
51°21′04″N 0°44′42″W / 51.351°N 0.745°W / 51.351; -0.745 (Barossa)
SU875621
YES SPA,[11] SSSI[17] This site is mainly heathland with areas of pine and deciduous woodland. Birds include nightjars, woodlarks and Dartford warblers. There are snakes such as adders and grass snakes, and lizards include slow worms and common lizards.[16]
Bay Pond[18] Bay Pond 7 hectares
(17 acres)
Godstone
51°14′53″N 0°03′50″W / 51.248°N 0.064°W / 51.248; -0.064 (Bay Pond)
TQ352516
NO SSSI[19] This is an educational reserve run by the Trust, with facilities such as an outdoor classroom. It has four ponds and the main one is believed to have been made in 1611 to hold back water for a mill. Other habitats are wildflower meadows and a mature alder swamp. Butterflies include gatekeeper, ringlet, small skipper and orange tip.[18]
Betchworth Quarry and Lime Kilns[20] Betchworth Quarry 27 hectares
(67 acres)
Betchworth
51°14′49″N 0°17′06″W / 51.247°N 0.285°W / 51.247; -0.285 (Betchworth Quarry and Lime Kilns)
TQ198511
YES SAC,[21] SSSI[22] This chalk downlands site is part of the North Downs and the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It has a rich variety of flowering plants, including orchids. The lime kilns house a variety of bat species, such as the whiskered, Natterer's, brown long-eared, Brandt's and Daubenton's.[20]
Bisley and West End Commons and Reidon Hill[23] Bisley Common 46 hectares
(110 acres)
Woking
51°19′30″N 0°38′42″W / 51.325°N 0.645°W / 51.325; -0.645 (Bisley and West End Commons and Reidon Hill)
SU945593
YES LNR,[24] SAC,[25] SPA,[11] SSSI[26] This site has heath, grassland and woodland. There are mammals such as roe deer, and invertebrates include adders, grass snakes, slow-worms and common lizards.[23]
Blindley Heath[27] Blindley Heath 26 hectares
(64 acres)
Godstone
51°11′10″N 0°02′42″W / 51.186°N 0.045°W / 51.186; -0.045 (Blindley Heath)
TQ367448
YES LNR,[28] SSSI[29] This damp grassland site on Weald Clay has a rich flora. There are also a number of ponds and the Ray Brook runs through the heath. The grassland is dominated by tussock grass and there are scattered oaks, hawthorns, willows and blackthorns.[30]
Brentmoor Heath and Folly Bog[31] Brentmoor Heath 59 hectares
(150 acres)
Woking
51°20′24″N 0°39′29″W / 51.340°N 0.658°W / 51.340; -0.658 (Brentmoor Heath and Folly Bog)
SU936610
YES LNR,[32] SAC,[25] SPA,[11] SSSI,[26] The nature reserve has heathland, woodland, acid grassland and ponds. There are grass snakes and adders and birds such as woodlarks, Dartford warblers, peregrine falcons and hobbies.[31]
Broadstreet, Backside and Rydes Commons[33] Backside Common 158 hectares
(390 acres)
Guildford
51°14′49″N 0°37′19″W / 51.247°N 0.622°W / 51.247; -0.622 (Broadstreet, Backside and Rydes Commons)
SU963507
YES These commons provide access to nature for people in the local area. The site has poor acidic grassland, oak and semi-mature birch woodland and ponds.[33]
Brockham Limeworks[34] Brockham Limeworks 45 hectares
(110 acres)
Brockham
51°14′53″N 0°16′30″W / 51.248°N 0.275°W / 51.248; -0.275 (Brockham Limeworks)
TQ205513
YES SAC,[21] SM,[35] SSSI[22] This former chalk quarry ceased operation in 1936. It had two batteries of lime kilns, which have become roosting sites for bats. Some of the floor of the quarry has become species-rich chalk grassland, with plants such as broad-leaved helleborine and pyramidal, common spotted, fragrant and bee orchids.[34]
Brookwood Lye[36] Brookwood Lye 22 hectares
(54 acres)
Brookwood
51°18′25″N 0°37′12″W / 51.307°N 0.620°W / 51.307; -0.620 (Brookwood Lye)
SU963573
NO This is mainly wet grassland which has a rich variety of flora. Other habitats include alder carr and broadleaved woodland. There are many birds and invertebrates such as dragonflies.[36]
Burner's Heath and Swallows Pond[37] Burner's Heath 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Pirbright
51°17′17″N 0°38′31″W / 51.288°N 0.642°W / 51.288; -0.642 (Burner's Heath and Swallows Pond)
SU948552
YES This site is mainly woodland. It is a conifer plantation with areas of broadleaf trees, heath and acid grassland.[37]
Chinthurst Hill[38] Chinthurst Hill 17 hectares
(42 acres)
Guildford
51°12′07″N 0°33′00″W / 51.202°N 0.550°W / 51.202; -0.550 (Chinthurst Hill)
TQ014458
YES LNR,[39] SM[40] The hill has woodland and dry acid grassland. There are woodland flowering plants such as wood anemone, yellow archangel, wood forget-me-not, red campion, common figwort, butcher’s broom and lady’s smock.[38]
Chitty's Common[41] Chitty's Common 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Guildford
51°15′43″N 0°35′53″W / 51.262°N 0.598°W / 51.262; -0.598 (Chitty's Common)
SU979524
YES This urban common has wet and dry woodland, grassland, ponds and ditches. There are large amounts of dead wood which provide a habitat for invertebrates such as stag beetles. The grassland has many butterflies such as commas, red admirals and peacocks.[41]
Chobham Common[42] Chobham Common 574 hectares
(1,420 acres)
Chobham
51°22′26″N 0°36′07″W / 51.374°N 0.602°W / 51.374; -0.602 (Chobham Common)
SU974648
YES NCR,[43] NNR,[44] SAC,[25] SM,[45][46][47] SPA,[11] SSSI[48] The common has a variety of habitats, such as wet and dry heathland, and its fauna and flora include many rare and scarce species, such as marsh clubmoss and marsh gentian. There are more than eighty birds species, including nationally important breeding populations of nightjars, woodlarks and Dartford warblers. The site is also very important for invertebrates, with sixty-four rare or scarce species, including the ant Formica rufibarbis, the robber fly Eutolmus rufibarbis and the silver-studded blue butterfly.[49]
Colekitchen Down[50] Colekitchen Down 3 hectares
(7.4 acres)
Gomshall
51°13′41″N 0°26′53″W / 51.228°N 0.448°W / 51.228; -0.448 (Colekitchen Down)
TQ084488
NO This sloping area of species-rich unimproved chalk grassland is surrounded by woodland and scrub. There is a variety of butterflies including chalkhill blue, small heath, adonis blue, gatekeeper, brimstone and marbled white.[50]
Crooksbury Hill[51] Crooksbury Hill 17 hectares
(42 acres)
[52]
Farnham
51°12′22″N 0°44′42″W / 51.206°N 0.745°W / 51.206; -0.745 (Crooksbury Hill)
SU878459
YES SM[53] There are extensive views from the top of the hill over south-west Surrey and east Hampshire. The site has sandy soil with heath and woodland. It was formerly part of Crooksbury Common, and the trees were planted after the area was enclosed in 1848.[51] Soldier's Ring on the north side of the hill is a Scheduled Monument: it is a hillfort dating to the late Bronze Age or early Iron Age.[53]
Cucknell's Wood[54] Cucknell's Wood 11 hectares
(27 acres)
Shamley Green
51°10′37″N 0°30′43″W / 51.177°N 0.512°W / 51.177; -0.512 (Cucknell's Wood)
TQ041430
YES

Birds in this 400 year old semi-natural wood include great spotted woodpecker, lesser spotted woodpecker, willow tit, treecreeper, nuthatch, goldcrest, green woodpecker and tawny owl. There are mammals such as dormice.[54]

Dawcombe[55] Dawcombe 23 hectares
(57 acres)
Reigate
51°15′32″N 0°15′36″W / 51.259°N 0.260°W / 51.259; -0.260 (Dawcombe)
TQ215525
NO SAC,[21] SSSI[22] This site is mainly chalk grassland with large areas of hawthorn scrub and woodland. The grassland provides a habitat for many species of orchids, including pyramidal, fly, common spotted, man, greater butterfly, fragrant and bee.[55]
Deepdene Terrace[56] Deepdene Terrace 4 hectares
(9.9 acres)
Dorking
51°13′41″N 0°19′01″W / 51.228°N 0.317°W / 51.228; -0.317 (Deepdene Terrace)
TQ175490
YES This woodland reserve has an avenue of beech trees and rhododendrons. There are also oaks, sweet chestnuts, yews, common limes and silver birches. The site also has grassland.[56]
Dollypers Hill[57] Dollypers Hill 12 hectares
(30 acres)
Coulsdon
51°18′36″N 0°06′54″W / 51.310°N 0.115°W / 51.310; -0.115 (Dollypers Hill)
TQ315584
YES This urban site has ancient woodland, chalk grassland and scrub. Grassland flowering plants include grass vetchling, eyebright, kidney vetch, bird's-foot trefoil, wood anemone, quaking grass and bluebell.[57]
Elstead Group of Commons[58] Elstead Common 180 hectares
(440 acres)
Elstead
51°10′19″N 0°40′37″W / 51.172°N 0.677°W / 51.172; -0.677 (Elstead Group of Commons)
SU926423
YES SPA,[59] SSSI[60] This site has heath, woodland and dry acid grassland, with scrub controlled by a herd of Belted Galloway cattle. It is important for saproxylic (dead wood eating) invertebrates, such as stag beetles. There are several ponds with a population of around a thousand toads.[58]
Fames Rough[61] Fames Rough 23 hectares
(57 acres)
Chipstead
51°18′07″N 0°11′13″W / 51.302°N 0.187°W / 51.302; -0.187 (Fames Rough)
TQ265574[62]
YES SSSI[63] This site is notable for its wild flowers.[61] Part of it is grassland which is periodically ploughed in order to provide a habitat for three very rare arable weeds, ground pine, cut-leaved germander and mat-grass fescue.[64]
Farncombe Wood[65] Farncombe Wood 1 hectare
(2.5 acres)
Godalming
51°12′04″N 0°37′01″W / 51.201°N 0.617°W / 51.201; -0.617 (Farncombe Wood)
SU967455
YES This steeply sloping wood was donated to the trust in 2003. It is mainly hazel coppice with oak standards. Ground flora include bluebells, wood anemone, yellow archangel and pignut.[65]
Fir Tree Copse[66] Fir Tree Copse 6 hectares
(15 acres)
Dunsfold
51°06′18″N 0°32′24″W / 51.105°N 0.540°W / 51.105; -0.540 (Fir Tree Copse)
TQ023350
YES SSSI[67] This is oak and ash woodland, with hazel coppice. Pipistrelle bats have been recorded, together with birds such as the tawny owl and willow warbler. There are many species of fungi on rotting logs, and invertebrates include the nationally scarce common fan-foot moth.[66]
The Forest and the Highlands[68] The Forest and the Highlands 27 hectares
(67 acres)
East Horsley
51°17′06″N 0°25′52″W / 51.285°N 0.431°W / 51.285; -0.431 (The Forest and the Highlands)
TQ095552
YES Almost 180 plant species and more than 50 of birds have been recorded in this woodland site, including woodpeckers, nuthatches, treecreeper and tawny owls. There are amphibians such as common toads and great crested newts.[68]
Fraser Down[69] Fraser Down 10 hectares
(25 acres)
Dorking
51°15′36″N 0°15′58″W / 51.260°N 0.266°W / 51.260; -0.266 (Fraser Down)
TQ211526
NO SAC,[21] SSSI[22] This is mainly chalk downland with some yew and beech woodland. The grassland has the rare silver-spotted skipper butterfly and wild flowers such as cowslip and wild marjoram.[69]
Glory Wood and Devil's Den[70] Glory Wood 13 hectares
(32 acres)
Dorking
51°13′19″N 0°19′19″W / 51.222°N 0.322°W / 51.222; -0.322 (Glory Wood and Devil's Den)
TQ173483
YES SM[71] The highest points of this wooded site have views over the North and South Downs. The main trees are oak and sweet chestnut and mammals include bats, roe deer, badgers and foxes.[70]
Gracious Pond[72] Gracious Pond 14 hectares
(35 acres)
Chobham
51°21′54″N 0°35′02″W / 51.365°N 0.584°W / 51.365; -0.584 (Gracious Pond)
SU987638
NO SSSI[48] This site has heath, wet woodland and ponds. Fauna include common toad and raft spiders, which can run on water. There are heathland plants such as round-leaved sundew and trees include beeches.[72]
Graeme Hendrey Wood[73] Graeme Hendrey Wood 10 hectares
(25 acres)
Bletchingley
51°14′02″N 0°04′23″W / 51.234°N 0.073°W / 51.234; -0.073 (Graeme Hendrey Wood)
TQ346501
YES This former sand and gravel quarry is now a wood, with ash, oak, sycamore, sweet chestnut, hazel and silver birch. Ground flora include enchanter’s nightshade, bird's-nest orchid and dog’s mercury.[73]
Hackhurst Downs[74] Hackhurst Downs 40 hectares
(99 acres)
Guildford
51°13′37″N 0°25′55″W / 51.227°N 0.432°W / 51.227; -0.432 (Hackhurst DownsHackhurst Downs)
TQ096487
YES LNR,[75] SSSI[76] Much of this steeply sloping site is chalk grassland which is grazed by goats, and there are also areas of mature woodland and scrub. Flowering plants include wild marjoram, hedge bedstraw, vervain, harebell and mouse-ear hawkweed.[74]
Hedgecourt[77] Hedgecourt 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Felbridge
51°08′42″N 0°04′12″W / 51.145°N 0.070°W / 51.145; -0.070 (Hedgecourt)
TQ351402
YES SSSI[78] This lakeside site has wet alder woodland, willow carr, damp oak woods and reedswamp. Twelve species of dragonfly have been recorded and breeding birds include water rails, mute swans, sedge warblers and tufted ducks.[77]
Hill Park[79] Hill Park 24 hectares
(59 acres)
Tatsfield
51°17′02″N 0°02′20″W / 51.284°N 0.039°W / 51.284; -0.039 (Hill Park)
TQ423559
YES LNR[80] This site on the slope of the North Downs has flora-rich chalk grassland with fly, bee and pyramidal orchids.[79] There is also woodland with ash, beech, yew and an avenue of horse chestnut.[80]
Howell Hill[81] Howell Hill 5 hectares
(12 acres)
Epsom
51°20′31″N 0°13′26″W / 51.342°N 0.224°W / 51.342; -0.224 (Howell Hill)
TQ238618
YES There are chalk spoil heaps on this calcareous grassland site. Around 260 species of flowering plants have been recorded, including mouse-eared hawkweed, kidney vetch, common spotted orchid, common knapweed, fragrant orchid and white helleborine orchid.[81]
Kitchen Copse[82] Kitchen Copse 7 hectares
(17 acres)
Bletchingley
51°15′22″N 0°05′53″W / 51.256°N 0.098°W / 51.256; -0.098 (Kitchen Copse)
TQ328525
NO This ancient semi-natural wood has diverse species of trees and ground flora. Flowering plants include dog's mercury, lesser celandine, yellow archangel, bluebell, enchanter's nightshade, primrose and common dog-violet.[82]
Ledgers Wood[83] Ledgers Wood 7 hectares
(17 acres)
Chelsham
51°18′54″N 0°01′37″W / 51.315°N 0.027°W / 51.315; -0.027 (Ledgers Wood)
TQ376592
YES This semi-natural wood is mainly oak, with other trees such as silver birch, ash, holly, hawthorn and sweet chestnut. Flowering plants include bluebell, lesser celandine and primrose.[83]
Littlefield Common[84] Littlefield Common 17 hectares
(42 acres)
Worplesdon
51°15′50″N 0°37′30″W / 51.264°N 0.625°W / 51.264; -0.625 (Littlefield Common)
SU960526
YES The common has wet and dry woodland, heath, grassland and ponds, which have a variety of amphibians such as newts, toads and frogs. Flora include common yellow sedge and heath spotted-orchid.[84]
Manor Farm[85] Manor Farm 25 hectares
(62 acres)
Byfleet
51°19′44″N 0°28′05″W / 51.329°N 0.468°W / 51.329; -0.468 (Manor Farm)
TQ068600
FP This was part of a deer park in the seventeenth century and in the Second World War the wet meadows next to the River Wey were ploughed as part of the Dig for Victory campaign. The site was then a market garden until 2006. The Trust acquired it in 2009 and is restoring it to its natural state.[85]
Middlebriars Wood[86] Middlebriars Wood 1 hectare
(2.5 acres)
Shackleford
51°12′11″N 0°38′13″W / 51.203°N 0.637°W / 51.203; -0.637 (Middlebriars Wood)
SU953457
YES This is a small mixed wood in a residential area of Hurtmore. The trust is working to improve its ecological value.[86]
Milford Green and Coxhill Green[87] Milford Green and Coxhill Green 15 hectares
(37 acres)
Chobham
51°20′17″N 0°35′13″W / 51.338°N 0.587°W / 51.338; -0.587 (Milford Green and Coxhill Green)
SU985608
YES These greens have wet and dry woodland with several ponds. Milford Green is mainly oak with other trees such as silver birch, horse chestnut, sweet chestnut, beech and elm. Coxhill Green is broad-leaved woodland with an area of Scots pine.[87]
Milton Heath and The Nower[88] Milton Heath and The Nower 16 hectares
(40 acres)
Dorking
51°13′30″N 0°20′46″W / 51.225°N 0.346°W / 51.225; -0.346 (Milton Heath and The Nower)
TQ156486
YES This site has woodland, heath and grassland. Birds include green woodpeckers, great spotted woodpeckers, tawny owls, nuthatches and treecreepers.[88]
Newdigate Brickworks[89] Newdigate Brickworks 24 hectares
(59 acres)
Newdigate
51°10′16″N 0°16′41″W / 51.171°N 0.278°W / 51.171; -0.278 (Newdigate Brickworks)
TQ205427
YES The clay pits of this former brickworks are now lakes and ponds which provide habitats for great crested newts and dragonflies such as the broad-bodied chaser and emperor. Other habitats are woodland, scrub, grassland and marsh and 188 plant species have been recorded.[89]
Newlands Corner[90] Newlands Corner 100 hectares
(250 acres)
Guildford
51°13′59″N 0°30′22″W / 51.233°N 0.506°W / 51.233; -0.506 (Newlands Corner)
TQ044493
YES This site is on a chalk ridge of the North Downs at a height of 170 metres (560 feet), which gives view across the Weald to the South Downs. The habitats are chalk grassland and mixed woodland. Mammals include roe deer and hazel dormice.[90]
Norbury Park[91] Norbury Park 531 hectares
(1,310 acres)
Dorking
51°16′19″N 0°20′28″W / 51.272°N 0.341°W / 51.272; -0.341 (Norbury Park)
TQ158538
YES RHPG,[92] SAC,[21] SSSI[22] The park was purchased by Surrey County Council to protect the land from being developed for housing and it is still managed for nature conservation. It has three farms, woodland, calcareous grassland and a stretch of the River Mole. Yew trees in Druid’s Grove are thought by SWT to be almost 3,000 years old.[91]
Nower Wood[93] Nower Wood 33 hectares
(82 acres)
Leatherhead
51°16′41″N 0°17′24″W / 51.278°N 0.290°W / 51.278; -0.290 (Nower Wood)
TQ193546
NO This is an educational reserve which hosts classrooms and children's events. It is mainly ancient oak woodland with areas of hazel coppice, chalk grassland, heath and artificial ponds which are used for pond dipping. There is a variety of birds such as woodcock and wood warbler.[93]
Nutfield Marshes[94] Nutfield Marshes 62 hectares
(150 acres)
Nutfield
51°14′46″N 0°09′07″W / 51.246°N 0.152°W / 51.246; -0.152 (Nutfield Marshes)
TQ291513
PP These former sand quarries along the Redhill Brook are now wetland nature reserves called The Moors, Spynes Mere, and Holmethorpe Lagoons. They provide habitats for many birds, with 144 species recorded in Holmethorpe Lagoon. Spynes Mere has three lakes.[94]
Papercourt Marshes[95] Papercourt Meadows 10 hectares
(25 acres)
Send
51°17′46″N 0°31′05″W / 51.296°N 0.518°W / 51.296; -0.518 (Papercourt Meadows)
TQ034562
NO SSSI[96] This wetland site has standing water scrapes, reed beds, marshes, wet woodland and grassy rides. More than a hundred species of bird have been recorded and the site also has a rich variety of aquatic plants and invertebrates.[95]
Poors Allotment[97] Poors Allotment 76 hectares
(190 acres)
Camberley
51°21′36″N 0°43′34″W / 51.360°N 0.726°W / 51.360; -0.726 (Poors Allotment)
SU888631
YES SPA,[11] SSSI[17] This site got its name because it was set aside under an early 19th century Enclosure Act to allow poor people to gather turf and bracken as fuel. It has heath, acid grassland and woods. Its importance lies in its fauna, such as woodlarks, nightjars, Dartford warblers, adders and several species of butterfly.[97]
Priest Hill[98] Priest Hill 35 hectares
(86 acres)
Epsom
51°20′20″N 0°14′10″W / 51.339°N 0.236°W / 51.339; -0.236 (Priest Hill)
TQ230615
PP More than 1,500 tons of tarmac and rubble were cleared from these former playing fields to create a grassland nature reserve. Three ponds have been created and cut grass and other plant matter from another reserve has been spread over some areas to introduce the seeds of wild flowers such as kidney vetch.[98]
Pucks Oak Barn and McAlmont Reserves[99] McAlmont Reserve 4 hectares
(9.9 acres)
Guildford
51°12′47″N 0°37′59″W / 51.213°N 0.633°W / 51.213; -0.633 (Pucks Oak Barn and McAlmont Reserves)
SU956469
YES This site is composed of four small woodland reserves, Farncombe Wood, Glebe Wood, Hayden's Copse and Pucks Oak Barn and Orchard. Ground flora include bluebells, wood anemone, ground elder and yellow archangel.[99]
Puttenham Common[100] Puttenham Common 253 hectares
(630 acres)
Puttenham
51°12′36″N 0°41′28″W / 51.210°N 0.691°W / 51.210; -0.691 (Puttenham Common)
SU915465
YES SM,[101] SSSI[102] This is a fragment of a formerly extensive heath, with other habitats including wet and dry woodland and ponds. The site is of archaeological interest, with the main feature being Hillbury hillfort, which probably dates to the Iron Age.[100]
Quarry Hangers[103] Quarry Hangers 11 hectares
(27 acres)
Caterham
51°15′58″N 0°06′50″W / 51.266°N 0.114°W / 51.266; -0.114 (Quarry Hangers)
TQ317536
YES SSSI[104] This chalk grassland site has very diverse flora and in some areas there are forty different species in a square metre, such as birdsfoot trefoil, salad burnet, wild strawberry, bee orchid, marjoram and wild thyme.[103]
Rodborough Common[105] Rodborough Common 62 hectares
(150 acres)
Milford
51°09′54″N 0°39′58″W / 51.165°N 0.666°W / 51.165; -0.666 (Rodborough Common)
SU934415
YES LNR[106] Sheep and cattle were grazed on the common in the 19th century, and it was used for military exercises in the Second World War. It has heath, woodland and acid grassland. Flora include greater stitchwort, enchanter's nightshade and germander speedwell, and there are reptiles such as grass snakes, slowworms and common lizards.[105]
Runfold Wood[107] Runfold Wood 12 hectares
(30 acres)
Farnham
51°12′50″N 0°45′25″W / 51.214°N 0.757°W / 51.214; -0.757 (Runfold Wood)
SU869468
YES This former beech plantation was badly damaged by the major storms of 1987 and 1990. It is now regenerating naturally as a mixed woodland. It has rare invertebrates, lichens and fungi together with birds such as blackcaps and nuthatches.[107]
Seale Chalk Pit and Meadow[108] Seale Chalk Pit 3 hectares
(7.4 acres)
Farnham
51°13′30″N 0°42′50″W / 51.225°N 0.714°W / 51.225; -0.714 (Seale Chalk Pit and Meadow)
SU 899 481
NO GCR,[109] SSSI[110] Part of this former quarry is a geological SSSI which exposes rocks of the Hog’s Back and exhibits the separation of the folding Mesozoic rocks of the Weald from the Tertiary sediments of the London Basin.[111] The site has a variety of butterflies and more than 130 species of chalk grassland plants have been recorded.[108]
Shabden Park[112] Shabden Park 103 hectares
(250 acres)
Chipstead
51°17′31″N 0°10′30″W / 51.292°N 0.175°W / 51.292; -0.175 (Shabden Park)
TQ274563
FP SSSI[63] This is a working farm which has wildlfower meadows on chalk grassland together with areas of woodland. It has a nationally scarce species of mining bee and other fauna include Roesel's bush-cricket and a variety of birds and butterflies.[112]
Sheepleas[113] Sheepleas 110 hectares
(270 acres)
East Horsley
51°15′07″N 0°26′24″W / 51.252°N 0.440°W / 51.252; -0.440 (Sheepleas)
TQ090515
YES GCR,[114] LNR,[115] SSSI[116] This sloping site on the North Downs has woodland, scrub and botanically rich grassland. The diverse invertebrate fauna includes two nationally rare flies, Norellia spinipes and Microdon devius. A cutting in Mountain Wood exposes a unique gravel Pleistocene deposit which throws light on the Quaternary history of the Weald and the evolution of the London Basin.[117]
Sheepwalk Lake[118] Sheepwalk Lake 9 hectares
(22 acres)
Shepperton
51°23′46″N 0°27′47″W / 51.396°N 0.463°W / 51.396; -0.463 (Sheepwalk Lake)
TQ070675
YES This former gravel pit was allowed to flood, unlike many others in the area which were used for landfill sites. It is used by more than 100 species of resident and migratory birds, including, kingfishers, herons, tufted ducks, moorhens, coots, cormorants and great crested grebes.[118]
Shere Woodlands[119] Shere Woodlands 44 hectares
(110 acres)
East Clandon
51°13′52″N 0°28′12″W / 51.231°N 0.470°W / 51.231; -0.470 (Shere Woodlands)
TQ069491
YES LNR,[120] SSSI[121] This site on a slope of the North Downs is mainly woodland and scrub, with a small area of unimproved chalk grassland. The woodland is dominated by beech and yew. There is a wide variety of bryophytes, including the rare moss Herzogiella seligeri.[122]
St Martha's Hill and Colyer's Hanger[123] St Martha Hill 38 hectares
(94 acres)
Chilworth
51°13′30″N 0°31′44″W / 51.225°N 0.529°W / 51.225; -0.529 (St Martha's Hill and Colyer's Hanger)
TQ028483
YES NCR,[124] SM,[125] SSSI[126] There is a church on the top of St Martha's Hill, which has views of eight counties on a clear day. The site is woodland and calcareous grassland, which has a rare mixture of chalk grassland flora.[123]
Staffhurst Wood[127] Staffhurst Wood 39 hectares
(96 acres)
Oxted
51°12′58″N 0°01′12″W / 51.216°N 0.020°W / 51.216; -0.020 (Staffhurst Wood)
TQ412483
YES LNR,[128] NCR,[124] SSSI[129] This common on Weald Clay has been wooded since the Anglo-Saxon period and past management has left many ancient trees intact. The canopy is mainly pedunculate oak and the older trees support a rich lichen flora. The moth fauna is outstanding, with six uncommon species.[130]
Stringer's Common[131] Stringer's Common 30 hectares
(74 acres)
Guildford
51°16′05″N 0°34′55″W / 51.268°N 0.582°W / 51.268; -0.582 (Stringer's Common)
SU990530
YES This is one of eight commons in the parish of Worplesdon near Guildford. It was formerly used for grazing, but it is now mainly mixed woodland with some heath and grassland.[131]
Thorpe Hay Meadow[132] Thorpe Hay Meadow 6 hectares
(15 acres)
Egham
51°25′12″N 0°31′12″W / 51.420°N 0.520°W / 51.420; -0.520 (Thorpe Hay Meadow)
TQ030700
YES SSSI[133] This hay meadow in the flood plain on alluvial gravels of the River Thames has plants which thrive in lime-rich soil. It is surrounded by mature hedgerows and a drainage ditch has five species of willow, including purple willow and almond willow.[134]
Thundry Meadows[135] Thundry Meadows 16 hectares
(40 acres)
Elstead
51°11′20″N 0°43′16″W / 51.189°N 0.721°W / 51.189; -0.721 (Thundry Meadows)
SU895441
YES SSSI[136] This site on the north bank of the River Wey grassland has alder carr, wet and dry woodland, ditches and springs. The meadows are maintained by Belted Galloway cattle, providing suitable conditions for harvest mice. An unusual habitat is quaking mire, a mat of vegetation floating on liquid peat.[135]
Tilburstow Hill[137] Tilburstow Hill 9 hectares
(22 acres)
Godstone
51°14′02″N 0°04′08″W / 51.234°N 0.069°W / 51.234; -0.069 (Tilburstow Hill)
TQ349501
YES This is a semi-natural broadleaved wood on the Greensand Ridge, with sweet chestnut, sessile and pedunculate oak, beech, silver birch and hazel. Ground flora include dog's mercury and garlic mustard.[137]
Underdown[138] Underdown 1 hectare
(2.5 acres)
Farnham
51°11′35″N 0°48′40″W / 51.193°N 0.811°W / 51.193; -0.811 (Underdown)
SU832444
YES This reserve was donated to the Trust by Mrs Underdown in memory of her husband in 1987. It is a steeply sloping area of gorse and heather together with mixed woodland. There is a variety of invertebrates, including solitary wasps.[138]
Vann Lake and Candy's Copse[139] Vann Lake and Candy's Copse 11 hectares
(27 acres)
Ockley
51°08′31″N 0°20′49″W / 51.142°N 0.347°W / 51.142; -0.347 (Vann Lake and Candy's Copse)
TQ157394
YES SSSI[140] The lake is believed to date to the middle of the 18th century, when a stream was dammed to power a mill which was never built. It is surrounded by ancient wet and dry woodland on Weald clay. Over 900 species of fungi have been recorded, including six new to Britain, and one, Myarium crystallinum, never previously recorded. The stream has a nationally rare cranefly, Molophilus lackschewitzianus.[139]
Wallis Wood[141] Wallis Wood 14 hectares
(35 acres)
Dorking
51°08′17″N 0°23′56″W / 51.138°N 0.399°W / 51.138; -0.399 (Wallis Wood)
TQ121389
YES A stream runs through this woodland reserve, which has an area of meadow pasture on its bank. Woodland flora include bluebells, broad-leaved helleborine orchids, violet helleborine orchids, common spotted orchids, primroses and wood anemone. There is a rare spider, Hyptiotes paradoxus, which lives in yew trees and is only found in one other site in the county.[141]
White Downs[142] White Downs 200 hectares
(490 acres)
Gomshall
51°13′48″N 0°24′32″W / 51.230°N 0.409°W / 51.230; -0.409 (White Downs)
TQ112491
YES NCR,[143] SSSI[76] This chalk grassland and mixed woodland site has many unusual fauna and flora. It has views across the countryside to Greensand Ridge.[142]
Whitmoor and Rickford Commons[144] Whitmoor Common 183 hectares
(450 acres)
Guildford
51°15′58″N 0°35′38″W / 51.266°N 0.594°W / 51.266; -0.594 (Whitmoor and Rickford Commons)
SU982529
YES LNR,[145] SPA,[11] SSSI[146] This site on the heath of the London Basin has a variety of heathland habitats, as well as areas of woodland, meadow and still and running water. The heath has a nationally scarce spider, Oxyopes heterophthalmus and beetle Hyperaspis pseudopustulata and there are nationally important populations of several bird species.[147]
Wisley and Ockham Commons and Chatley Heath[148] Wisley and Ockham Commons 297 hectares
(730 acres)
Wisley
51°19′12″N 0°27′07″W / 51.320°N 0.452°W / 51.320; -0.452 (Wisley and Ockham Commons and Chatley Heath)
TQ080590
YES LNR,[149] SPA,[11] SSSI[150] This site is mainly heathland but it also has areas of open water, bog, woodland and scrub. It has a rich flora and it is of national importance for true flies and for dragonflies and damselflies. Rare species include the white-faced darter dragonfly and the Thyridanthrax fenestratus bee fly.[151]
Wotton and Abinger Commons[152] Wotton and Abinger Commons 324 hectares
(800 acres)
Holmbury St Mary
51°11′49″N 0°22′52″W / 51.197°N 0.381°W / 51.197; -0.381 (Wotton and Abinger Commons)
TQ132454
YES SSSI[153] Abinger Common, which was formerly a grazing heath, is a wood with sessile oak dominant and a shrub layer of holly and bilberry. Wotton Common has many paths and bridleways through calcareous grassland, heath and woodland.[152]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Seventy-four reserves are listed below. Four sites are excluded because the SWT does not give a clear location and states that they are not open to the public. They are Pirbright Ranges,[3] Seccombe's Wood,[4] Wentworth[5] and Whippets Cant.[6]
  2. ^ a b Unless otherwise stated, the area and location are taken from the Wildlife Trust page for each site.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Surrey Wildlife Trust". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 19 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Find a reserve". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Pirbright Ranges". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  4. ^ "Seccombe's Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Wentworth". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  6. ^ "Whippets Cant". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  7. ^ "Surrey". Encyclopedia Britannica. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  8. ^ "How is the population of Surrey changing?". Surrey County Council. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  9. ^ "The County of Surrey". Visit Surrey. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Ash Ranges". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h "Designated Sites View: Thames Basin Heaths". Special Protection Areas. Natural England. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  12. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ash to Brookwood Heaths". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  13. ^ a b "Ashtead Park". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  14. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ashtead Park". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Ashtead Park". Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. Historic England. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  16. ^ a b "Barossa". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  17. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Broadmoor to Bagshot Woods and Heaths". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  18. ^ a b "Bay Pond". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  19. ^ "Designated Sites View: Godstone Ponds". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  20. ^ a b "Betchworth Quarry and Lime Kilns". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  21. ^ a b c d e "Designated Sites View: Mole Gap to Reigate Escarpment". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  22. ^ a b c d e "Designated Sites View: Mole Gap to Reigate Escarpment". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 9 November 2018.
  23. ^ a b "Bisley and West End Commons and Reidon Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  24. ^ "Designated Sites View: Bisley and West End Commons". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  25. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: Thursley, Ash, Pirbright & Chobham". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Archived from the original on 19 November 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  26. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Colony Bog and Bagshot Heath". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 6 November 2018.
  27. ^ "Blindley Heath". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  28. ^ "Designated Sites View: Blindley Heath". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 4 November 2018. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  29. ^ "Designated Sites View: Blindley Heath". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 4 November 2018. Retrieved 3 November 2018.
  30. ^ "Blindley Heath citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 November 2018.
  31. ^ a b "Brentmoor Heath and Folly Bog". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  32. ^ "Designated Sites View: Brentmoor Heath". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 6 November 2018.
  33. ^ a b "Broadstreet, Backside and Rydes Commons". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  34. ^ a b "Brockham Limeworks". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  35. ^ "Brockham Lime Works: lime kilns and hearthstone min". Historic England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 29 November 2018.
  36. ^ a b "Brookwood Lye". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  37. ^ a b "Burner's Heath and Swallows Pond". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  38. ^ a b "Chinthurst Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  39. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chinthurst Hill". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  40. ^ "Chinthurst Hill Tower". Historic England. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  41. ^ a b "Chitty's Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  42. ^ "Chobham Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  43. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 119, 304–05
  44. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chobham Common". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  45. ^ "Earthwork NW of Childown Farm on Chobham Common". Historic England. Archived from the original on 26 October 2018. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  46. ^ "Memorial Cross, Chobham Common". Historic England. Archived from the original on 6 November 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  47. ^ "'Bee Garden' earthwork on Albury Bottom". Historic England. Archived from the original on 6 November 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  48. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chobham Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 31 December 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  49. ^ "Chobham Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 6 November 2018.
  50. ^ a b "Colekitchen Down". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  51. ^ a b "Crooksbury Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  52. ^ "Crooksbury Hill". Woodland Trust. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  53. ^ a b "Soldier's Ring hillfort". Historic England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  54. ^ a b "Cucknell's Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  55. ^ a b "Dawcombe". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  56. ^ a b "Deepdene Terrace". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  57. ^ a b "Dollypers Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  58. ^ a b "Elstead Group of Commons". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  59. ^ "Designated Sites View: Thursley, Hankley & Frensham Commons". Special Protection Areas. Natural England. Archived from the original on 19 November 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  60. ^ "Designated Sites View: Thursley, Hankley & Frensham Commons". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 1 December 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  61. ^ a b "Fames Rough". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  62. ^ "Fames Rough". Woodland Trust. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  63. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chipstead Downs". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  64. ^ "Chipstead Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  65. ^ a b "Farncombe Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  66. ^ a b "Fir Tree Copse". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  67. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chiddingfold Forest". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  68. ^ a b "The Forest and the Highlands". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  69. ^ a b "Fraser Down". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  70. ^ a b "Glory Wood and Devil's Den". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  71. ^ "Bowl barrow in The Glory Wood". Historic England. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  72. ^ a b "Gracious Pond". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  73. ^ a b "Graeme Hendrey Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  74. ^ a b "Hackhurst Downs". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  75. ^ "Designated Sites View: Hackhurst Downs". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  76. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hackhurst and White Downs". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  77. ^ a b "Hedgecourt". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  78. ^ "Designated Sites View: Hedgecourt". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 8 November 2018.
  79. ^ a b "Hill Park". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  80. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Hill Park, Tatsfield". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  81. ^ a b "Howell Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  82. ^ a b "Kitchen Copse". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  83. ^ a b "Ledgers Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  84. ^ a b "Littlefield Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  85. ^ a b "Manor Farm". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  86. ^ a b "Middlebriars Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  87. ^ a b "Milford Green and Coxhill Green". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  88. ^ a b "Milton Heath and The Nower". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  89. ^ a b "Newdigate Brickworks". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  90. ^ a b "Newlands Corner". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  91. ^ a b "Norbury Park". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  92. ^ "Norbury Park". Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. Historic England. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved December 2018. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  93. ^ a b "Nower Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  94. ^ a b "Nutfield Marshes". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  95. ^ a b "Papercourt Meadows". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  96. ^ "Designated Sites View: Papercourt". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 15 November 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  97. ^ a b "Poors Allotment". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  98. ^ a b "Priest Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  99. ^ a b "Pucks Oak Barn and McAlmont Reserves". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  100. ^ a b "Puttenham Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  101. ^ "Hillbury hillfort". Historic England. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  102. ^ "Designated Sites View: Puttenham and Crooksbury Commons". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  103. ^ a b "Quarry Hangers". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  104. ^ "Designated Sites View: Quarry Hanger". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  105. ^ a b "Rodborough Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  106. ^ "Designated Sites View: Rodborough Common". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  107. ^ a b "Runfold Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  108. ^ a b "Seale Chalk Pit and Meadow". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 16 November 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  109. ^ "Seale Chalk Pit (Alpine Structures of Southern England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  110. ^ "Designated Sites View: Seale Chalk Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  111. ^ "Seale Chalk Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  112. ^ a b "Shabden Park". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  113. ^ "Sheepleas". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  114. ^ "Mountain Wood (Quaternary of South-East England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 29 October 2018. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  115. ^ "Designated Sites View: Sheepleas". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  116. ^ "Designated Sites View: Sheepleas". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  117. ^ "Sheepleas citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  118. ^ a b "Sheepwalk Lake". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  119. ^ "Shere Woodlands". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  120. ^ "Designated Sites View: Shere Woodlands". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  121. ^ "Designated Sites View: Combe Bottom". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  122. ^ "Combe Bottom citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  123. ^ a b "St Martha's Hill and Colyer's Hanger". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  124. ^ a b Ratcliffe, p. 50
  125. ^ "Earth circles on St Martha's Hill". Historic England. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  126. ^ "Designated Sites View: Colyers Hanger". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  127. ^ "Staffhurst Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  128. ^ "Designated Sites View: Staffhurst Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 28 October 2018.
  129. ^ "Designated Sites View: Staffhurst Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  130. ^ "Staffhurst Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
  131. ^ a b "Stringer's Common". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  132. ^ "Thorpe Hay Meadow". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  133. ^ "Designated Sites View: [Thorpe Hay Meadow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  134. ^ "Thorpe Hay Meadow citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  135. ^ a b "Thundry Meadows". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  136. ^ "Designated Sites View: Charleshill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  137. ^ a b "Tilburstow Hill". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  138. ^ a b "Underdown". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  139. ^ a b "Vann Lake and Candy's Copse". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  140. ^ "Designated Sites View: Vann Lake and Ockley Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  141. ^ a b "Wallis Wood". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  142. ^ a b "White Downs". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  143. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 118–19
  144. ^ "Whitmoor and Rickford Commons". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 21 June 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  145. ^ "Designated Sites View: Whitmoor and Rickford Commons". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  146. ^ "Designated Sites View: Whitmoor Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  147. ^ "Whitmoor Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  148. ^ "Wisley and Ockham Commons and Chatley Heath". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  149. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ockham and Wisley". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  150. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ockham and Wisley Commons". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 3 January 2019. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  151. ^ "Ockham and Wisley Commons citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  152. ^ a b "Wotton and Abinger Commons". Surrey Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2018.
  153. ^ "Designated Sites View: Leith Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 9 November 2018. Retrieved 14 November 2018.

Sources[edit]

  • Ratcliffe, Derek, ed. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-21403-3.

Coordinates: 51°15′N 0°25′W / 51.250°N 0.417°W / 51.250; -0.417

External links[edit]