Surrogacy Arrangements Act 1985

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The Surrogacy Arrangements Act 1985 (c. 49) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that prohibits commercial surrogacy arrangements. It received Royal Assent on 16 July 1985.

The Act came about as a response to the birth, on 4 January 1985, of Britain's first commercial surrogate baby amid a widespread public outcry.[1]

The Act was amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (so that surrogate mothers can always keep the baby if they change their mind)[2] and the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008.

From 1996-1998 Margaret Brazier chaired a review of surrogacy arrangements.[3][4] It made a number of recommendations including that only expenses, including loss of earnings, should be paid to surrogate mothers, and that all surrogacy agencies should be registered with the Department of Health.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brahams D (February 1987). "The hasty British ban on commercial surrogacy". Hastings Cent Rep. 17 (1): 16–9. doi:10.2307/3562435. JSTOR 3562435. PMID 3557939. 
  2. ^ "Thirteen years of controversy". BBC News Online. 14 October 1998. 
  3. ^ "Health Review proposes regulation for surrogacy". BBC News. 1998-10-16. Retrieved 2014-07-21. 
  4. ^ "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] Surrogacy: Review for health ministers of current arrangements for payments and regulation - Report of the review team : Department of Health - Publications". Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 2010-04-08. Retrieved 2014-07-21. 
  5. ^ "Health Review proposes regulation for surrogacy". BBC News. 1998-10-16. Retrieved 2014-07-21. 
  6. ^ "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] Surrogacy: Review for health ministers of current arrangements for payments and regulation - Report of the review team : Department of Health - Publications". Webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 2010-04-08. Retrieved 2014-07-21. 

External links[edit]