Susan C. Aldridge

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Susan C. Aldridge is an American academic and university administrator. She was president of the University of Maryland University College from 1 February 2006[1] until March 2012, and was a senior fellow with the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.[2] In 2013 she was appointed senior vice president for online learning at Drexel University, and president of Drexel e-Learning.[3]

Biography[edit]

Aldridge studied at the Colorado Women's College, completing a BA in sociology and psychology in 1977, and then at the University of Colorado at Denver, where she obtained a masters and then a doctorate in public administration, graduating in 1991.[3] During this period she worked for the Denver Regional Council of Governments, initially as a planner and then as a division director.[citation needed]

From 1991 to 1994 she taught at the National University of Singapore.[3] After a spending some time as a vice president of World Marketing, Inc, she returned to the education sector in 1995, taking on the position of the director of the Western Region at Troy University.[4] While at Troy University, Aldridge was promoted to vice chancellor of the University College in 2001, overseeing "nontraditional programs".[4][5]

She became president of University of Maryland University College in 2006.[5] In February 2012 she went on indefinite leave,[6] and in March resigned as president of UMUC; she continued to act as a special adviser to the college at an annual salary of $306,800 until August 31, 2012.[7] William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, acknowledged that an anonymous complaint had been filed with the Maryland Office of Legislative Audits; the complaint alleged that "hush money" payments had been made to staff whose contracts had been terminated.[7] On 26 March 2012 the chairman of the U.S. Senate Education Committee asked Kirwan to provide him with records of workplace practices and enrolment at the college.[8][9][10][11][12]

The American Association of State Colleges and Universities appointed Aldridge a senior fellow in January 2013.[2] Later that year, in September, she was made senior vice president for online learning at Drexel University, and president of Drexel e-Learning.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ University of Maryland University College (2007). Office of the President: Susan C. Aldridge, PhD at the Wayback Machine (archived December 3, 2007). University of Maryland University College. Archived 3 December 2007.
  2. ^ a b "AASCU Names Dr. Susan Aldridge as Senior Fellow" (press release). (September 3, 2013). Targeted News Service, USA.
  3. ^ a b c d Drexel University. (September 3, 2013). "Drexel University Announces New Head of Online Learning". Drexel Now, Drexel University, Philadelphia. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Troy University. (November 29, 2005). "Troy University administrator to take Maryland post" at the Wayback Machine (archived May 28, 2010) (press release). 'Troy University. Archived from the original on May 28, 2010.
  5. ^ a b Frick, Walter. (March 20, 2006). "UMUC chief knows world of education". The Washington Times. pC16.
  6. ^ William E. Kirwan (28 February 2012). An Important Message from USM Chancellor William E. Kirwan. University of Maryland University College. Accessed September 2013.
  7. ^ a b Jack Stripling (22 March 2012). Resignation Comes at Key Moment for Maryland Institution, With Major Military Contracts Up for Renewal. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed September 2013.
  8. ^ Daniel de Vise (27 March 2012). Senate chair request UMUC enrollment, workplace records. The Washington Post. Accessed September 2013.
  9. ^ Daniel de Vise (12 March 2012). Complaint alleges UMUC made 'hush money' payments to disgruntled employees. The Washington Post, PostLocal. Accessed September 2013.
  10. ^ Daniel de Vise (27 February 2012). UMUC under Susan Aldridge: A grim account. The Washington Post, PostLocal. Accessed September 2013.
  11. ^ Jack Stripling and Marc Parry (29 February 2012). President's Status a Mystery at Disparate Institution. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Accessed September 2013.
  12. ^ Kevin Kiley (28 February 2012). Dangers of Depleted Morale. Inside Higher Ed. Accessed September 2013.

External links[edit]