Susan Feilding, Countess of Denbigh

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Royalist father and Roundhead son; being the memoirs of the first and second earls of Denbigh, 1600-1675 (1915) (14757234486).jpg

Susan Feilding, Countess of Denbigh (née Villiers; 1583 – 1652) was an English courtier. She was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Henrietta Maria.

Born Susan Villiers, she was the youngest daughter of Sir George Villiers and his wife, Mary Beaumont. About 1607, she married Sir William Feilding, who was later created Earl of Denbigh. They had five children:

During the English Civil War, her husband, the Earl of Denbigh, supported and fought for King Charles I of England, while her son, Basil, joined the Parliamentarian forces. The Earl was wounded during an attack on Birmingham and died of his injuries in 1643. The next year Susan fled to France with Queen Henrietta Marie. It was in France that Susan converted to Roman Catholicism and in 1651 the council of state ordered the sequestration of all her property in England on the grounds that she had become Papist and was active in designs against the state.[6] She was the patron of Richard Crashaw, who dedicated his sacred poems to her, in hearty acknowledgment of his immortal obligation to her goodness and charity, and addressed to her a poem persuading her — to render herself without further delay into the communion of the Catholic Church.[7] The Countess died while in France, in 1652, and was buried in Église Saint-Eustache, Paris.[8]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1084.
  2. ^ G. E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H. A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 487.
  3. ^ G. E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H. A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VI, page 261.
  4. ^ Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 516.
  5. ^ Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 265.
  6. ^ Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1651, pp. 149, 288.
  7. ^ Crashaw, Poems, ed. 1858, pp. 141, 146.
  8. ^ Feilding, Cecilia Mary Clifford, Countess of Denbigh, (1915). Royalist Father and Roundhead Son; being the memoirs of the first and second earls of Denbigh, 1600-1675, p. 287. Methuen & Co, London. ISBN 1-152-58850-8.