Susquehanna River Bridge

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Susquehanna River Bridge
Susquehanna River Bridge Pennsylvania Turnpike 2.jpg
Coordinates 40°12′15″N 76°48′18″W / 40.20417°N 76.80500°W / 40.20417; -76.80500Coordinates: 40°12′15″N 76°48′18″W / 40.20417°N 76.80500°W / 40.20417; -76.80500
Carries 6 lanes of I-76 / Penna Turnpike
Crosses Susquehanna River
Locale Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Maintained by Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission
Characteristics
Design 1950 bridge: steel plate girder bridge; 2007 bridge: concrete segmental bridge
Total length 4,526 feet
History
Opened old bridge: 1950; new bridge: 2007
Statistics
Toll Fares dictated by Pennsylvania Turnpike
(E-ZPass)

The Susquehanna River Bridge carries Interstate 76 (Pennsylvania Turnpike) across the Susquehanna River between Dauphin and York County near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

History[edit]

The original structure was built as a steel girder bridge with concrete piers. The steel was provided from a plant operated by Bethlehem Steel, directly adjacent to the turnpike in Steelton, Pennsylvania.[1] It was opened to traffic in 1950.[2]

On November 16, 2004, the Turnpike Commission let a contract for a bridge to replace the 1950 span.[3] Two new 3-lane segmental, concrete signature spans were constructed just upriver from the old 4 lane span. The new span was the first of its type built in Pennsylvania at a cost of nearly $100 million [1]. The westbound span opened on May 17, 2007, and the eastbound span was opened on June 17, 2007. The new roadway and bridges opened to normal traffic flow in the summer of 2008. The old span was demolished on August 22, 2007.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pennsylvania Highways (October 6, 2006). "History of the Pennsylvania Turnpike". pahighways.com. Retrieved 2006-12-14. 
  2. ^ Harrisburg Area Riverboat Society (November 29, 2006). "Bridges on the Susquehanna River". harrisburgriverboat.com. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  3. ^ "Susquehanna River Bridge Project - Project Overview". Retrieved 2007-07-11. 
  4. ^ Chris A. Courogen (22 August 2007). "Turnpike flow resumes after demolition". The Patriot-News. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 

External links[edit]