Susquehanna Township High School

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Susquehanna Township High School
Susquehanna Township High School Logo.gif
Location
Harrisburg, PA
Information
Type Public high school
School district Susquehanna Township School District
Faculty 66.4 Full Time (as of 2009-2010)[1]
Grades 9 to 12
Enrollment Coeducational
Number of students 996 (2010)
Color(s) Red and White
Athletics Indians (boys), Lady Indians (Girls)
Athletics conference PIAA
Mascot Indian
Affiliation Secular
Community Susquehanna Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania
Address 3550 Elmerton Avenue
Website

Susquehanna Township High School (STHS) is a midsized, public high school located in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania serving students from Susquehanna Township. The school provides grades 9 through 12. In 2014, the school had 898 pupils, with 35.9% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level. Additionally, 13% of pupils received special education services, while 6.9% of pupils were identified as gifted. According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind in 2014.

In 2010, 253 students were eligible for the federal free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty. Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian - 454, Hispanic - 41, Black - 448, Asian and Pacific Islanders - 46 and Alaskan/Native American - 1.[2] In 2010, the school employed 64 teachers yielding a student teacher ratio of 16:1.[3] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[4]

Graduation rate[edit]

In 2015, the District’s graduation rate was 93%.[5]

  • 2014 - declined to 94.5%.[6]
  • 2013 - 94%.[7]
  • 2013 - 88%.[8]
  • 2012 - 90%[9]
  • 2011 - 91%.[10]
  • 2010 - 87%, the Pennsylvania Department of Education issued a new, 4-year cohort graduation rate.[11]
Calculated under former formula
  • 2010 - 97% [12]
  • 2009 - 98% [13]
  • 2008 - 94%
  • 2007 - 94% [14]

Academic achievement[edit]

2015 School Performance Profile[edit]

Susquehanna Township High School achieved 62.3 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement.The PDE reported that 73% of the High School’s students were on grade level in reading/literature. In Algebra 1, 63.9% of students showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology I, 58.5% demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[15] Statewide, 53 percent of schools with an eleventh grade achieved an academic score of 70 or better. Five percent of the 2,033 schools with 11th grade were scored at 90 and above; 20 percent were scored between 80 and 89; 28 percent between 70 and 79; 25 percent between 60 and 69 and 22 percent below 60. The Keystone Exam results showed: 73 percent of students statewide scored at grade-level in English, 64 percent in Algebra I and 59 percent in biology.[16][17]

2014 School Performance Profile[edit]

Susquehanna Township High School achieved 65 out of 100, which reflects achievement in grade level reading, mathematics and science. In reading/literature - 74% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 64% showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology, 48% demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[18][19] Statewide, the percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in Algebra I increased to 39.7% to 40.1%. The percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in reading/literature declined to 52.5%. The percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in biology improved from 39.7% to 41.4%.[20]

2013 School Performance Profile[edit]

Susquehanna Township High School achieved 65.8 out of 100, which reflects achievement in grade level reading, mathematics and science. In reading/literature - 75.9% of tested students were on grade level. In Algebra 1, only 61% showed on grade level skills at the end of their Algebra course. In Biology, 32% showed on grade level science understanding.[21] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,181 public schools (less than 73 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher. Pennsylvania 11th grade students no longer take the PSSAs. Instead, they now take the Keystone Exams at the end of the associated course.

Adequate Yearly Progress[edit]

In 2012, Susquehanna Township High School declined to School Improvement Level I Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) status due to low student achievement in math and reading.[22] Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the school administration was required to notify parents of the school's poor achievement outcomes. Additionally, the School administration was required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, to develop a School Improvement Plan to address the school's low student achievement. Under the Pennsylvania Accountability System, the school district must pay for additional tutoring for struggling students.[23] Susquehanna Township High School was eligible for special, extra funding under School Improvement Grants which the school must apply for each year.[24]

  • 2011 - declined to Warning status due to lower student achievement.[25]
  • 2010 - achieved AYP status.
  • 2009 - Warning status due to low student achievement.[26]
  • 2008 - achieved AYP status.
  • 2007 - achieved AYP status.
  • 2006 - Warning status due to low student achievement.[27]

2003-2005 - achieved AYP status each school year

PSSA Results

Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered from 2003 through 2012, in all Pennsylvania public high schools. The exams were administered in the Spring of each school year. The goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focused on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The Science exam included content in science, technology, ecology and the environmental studies. The mathematics exam included: algebra I, algebra II, geometry and trigonometry. The standards were first published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[28] In 2013, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania changed its high school assessments to the Keystone Exams in Algebra 1, Reading/literature and Biology1. The exams are given at the end of the course, rather than all in the spring of the student's 11th grade year.[29]

11th Grade Reading:
  • 2012 - 71% on grade level, (8% below basic). State - 67% of 11th graders are on grade level.[30]
  • 2011 - 65% (16% below basic). State - 69.1% [31]
  • 2010 - 73%, State - 67%
  • 2009 - 65%, State - 65%
  • 2008 - 77%, State - 65% [32]
  • 2007 - 73%, State - 65% [33]
11th Grade Math:
  • 2012 - 60% on grade level (24% below basic). In Pennsylvania, 59% of 11th graders are on grade level.[34]
  • 2011 - 57% (23% below basic). State - 60.3%.
  • 2010 - 61%, State - 59% [35]
  • 2009 - 60%, State - 56% [36]
  • 2008 - 68%, State - 56%
  • 2007 - 54%, State - 53%
11th Grade Science:
  • 2012 - 41% on grade level (11% below basic). State - 42% of 11th graders were on grade level.
  • 2011 - 32% (25% below basic). State - 40%
  • 2010 - 39%, State - 39% [37]
  • 2009 - 35%, State - 40%
  • 2008 - 34%, State - 39% [38]

Science in Motion Susquehanna Township High School did not take advantage of a state program called Science in Motion which brought college professors and sophisticated science equipment to the school to raise science awareness and to provide inquiry-based experiences for the students. The Science in Motion program was funded by a state appropriation and cost the school nothing to participate.[39] Susquehanna University provided the science enrichment experiences to schools in the region.

College Remediation[edit]

According to a Pennsylvania Department of Education study released in January 2009, 44% of Susquehanna Township School District graduates required remediation in mathematics and or reading' before they were prepared to take college level courses in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education or community colleges.[40] Less than 66% of Pennsylvania high school graduates, who enroll in a four-year college in Pennsylvania, will earn a bachelor's degree within six years. Among Pennsylvania high school graduates pursuing an associate degree, only one in three graduate in three years.[41] Per the Pennsylvania Department of Education, one in three recent high school graduates who attend Pennsylvania's public universities and community colleges takes at least one remedial course in math, reading or English.

SAT Scores[edit]

In 2014, 158 Susquehanna Township School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 487. The Math average score was 496. The Writing average score was 452.[42] Statewide in Pennsylvania, Verbal Average Score was 497. The Math average score was 504. The Writing average score was 480. The College Board also reported that nationwide scores were: 497 in reading, 513 in math and 487 in writing.[43]

In 2013, 164 Susquehanna Township School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 487. The Math average score was 500. The Writing average score was 464. The College Board reported that statewide scores were: 494 in reading, 504 in math and 482 in writing. The nationwide SAT results were the same as in 2012.[44]

In 2012, 185 Susquehanna Township School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 473. The Math average score was 488. The Writing average score was 451. The statewide Verbal SAT exams results were: Verbal 491, Math 501, Writing 480. In the USA, 1.65 million students took the exams achieving scores: Verbal 496, Math 514, Writing 488. According to the College Board the maximum score on each section was 800, and 360 students nationwide scored a perfect 2,400.

In 2011, 149 Susquehanna Township High School students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 496. The Math average score was 505. The Writing average score was 476.[45] Pennsylvania ranked 40th among states with SAT scores: Verbal - 493, Math - 501, Writing - 479.[46] In the United States 1.65 million students took the exam in 2011. They averaged 497 (out of 800) verbal, 514 math and 489 in writing.[47]

Dual Enrollment program[edit]

Susquehanna Township High School offers a Dual Enrollment program. This state program permits high school students to take courses, at local higher education institutions, to earn college credits. Students remain enrolled at their high school. The courses count towards high school graduation requirements and towards earning a college degree. The students continue to have full access to activities at their high school. The college credits are offered at a deeply discounted rate. The state offers a small grant to assist students in costs for tuition, fees and books.[48] Under the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement, many Pennsylvania colleges and universities accept these credits for students who transfer to their institutions.[49] For the 2009-10 funding year, the school district received a state grant of $37,971 for the program.

Similar to Dual Enrollment, the high school also offers seniors the chance to enroll at Capital Area School for the Arts for half of the day. Credits earned at the CASA program transfer to the high school transcript.

Graduation requirements[edit]

Among Pennsylvania's 500 public school districts, graduation requirements widely vary. The School Board has determined that a pupil must earn 25 credits to graduate, including: a required class every year in math, English, social studies, science, Physical Education and electives.

The Susquehanna Township School Board requires that each candidate for graduation shall have earned 25 credits including: English 4 credits, Social Studies 4 credits, Science 3 credits, Mathematics 3 credits, Health & Physical Education 2 credits, Careers 0.25 credits, Information Literacy Skills 0.17 credits, and Elective & Major Sequences 8.58 credits.[50][51]

By law, all Pennsylvania secondary school students must complete a project as a part of their eligibility to graduate from high school. The type of project, its rigor and its expectations are set by the individual school district.[52] Effective with the graduating class of 2017, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education eliminated the state mandate that students complete a culminating project in order to graduate.[53]

By Pennsylvania School Board regulations, for the graduating class of 2017, students must demonstrate successful completion of secondary level course work in Algebra I, Biology, English Composition, and Literature.[54][55][56] The Keystone Exam is given at the end of the course. Keystone Exams replace the PSSAs for 11th grade.[57]

Students have several opportunities to pass the exam. Those who do not pass after several attempts can perform a project in order to graduate.[58][59] For the class of 2019, a Composition exam will be added. For the class of 2020, passing a civics and government exam will be added to the graduation requirements.[60] In 2011, Pennsylvania high school students field tested the Algebra 1, Biology and English Lit exams. The statewide results were: Algebra 1 38% on grade level, Biology 35% on grade level and English Lit - 49% on grade level.[61] Individual student, school or district reports were not made public, although they were reported to district officials by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students identified as having special needs and qualifying for an Individual Educational Program (IEP) may graduate by meeting the requirements of their IEP.

AP Courses[edit]

In 2014, Susquehanna Township High School offered 17 Advanced Placement (AP) courses at a higher cost than regular courses. The students pay to take the AP exam. The fee for each AP Exam is $91 (2014).[62] The school normally retains $9 of that fee as a rebate to help with administrative costs. In 2012, the fee was $89 per test per pupil. Students have the option of taking College Board approved courses and then taking the College Board's examination in the Spring. Students, who achieve a 3 or better on the exam, may be awarded college credits at US universities and colleges. Each higher education institution sets its own standards about what level of credits are awarded to a student based on their AP exam score. Most higher education give credits for scores of 4 or 5. Some schools also give credits for scores of 3. High schools give credits towards graduation to students who take the school's AP class. At Susquehanna Township High School 47% of students who took an AP course earned a 3 or better on the exam.[63] In 2015, the School again offered 17 AP courses, with 61.6 % of students who took an AP course achieved a 3 or better on the AP exam given by the College Board.

Classrooms for the Future grant[edit]

The Classroom for the Future state program provided districts with hundreds of thousands of extra state funding to buy laptop computers for each core curriculum high school class (English, Science, History, Mathematics) and paid for teacher training to optimize the computers use. The program was funded from 2006–2009. Susquehanna Township School District did not apply for funding in 2006–07. In 2007–08, Susquehanna Township School District received $171,104. In 2008–09, the District received $52,046 for a total funding of $223,150.[64] Among the public school districts in Dauphin County, the highest award was given to Harrisburg City School District which received $692,809. The highest funding statewide was awarded to Philadelphia City School District in Philadelphia County - $9,409,073. The grant program was discontinued by Governor Edward Rendell as part of the 2009-10 state budget.

Project 720[edit]

Project 720 was a high school reform program implemented for three years under the Rendell administration. The intent was to increase academic rigor and improve the instruction of teachers in the Commonwealth’s high schools. Teachers were expected to use data driven instructional practices and to meet the needs of diverse learners.[65] The 720 in the name referred to the number of days a student was in high school in ninth through 12th grades. High school’s applied for funding and were required to agree to report to the PDE their plans, their actions and the outcomes. In 2007-08 budget year, the Commonwealth provided $11 million in funding. Susquehanna Township did no t participate in any year of the grant.[66][67] For 2010-11, Project 720 funding was decreased to $1.7 million by Governor Rendell. The grant program was discontinued effective with the 2011-12 state budget.[68]

Extracurriculars[edit]

Susquehanna Township School District offers a wide variety of clubs, activities and an extensive, costly competitive sports program. Eligibility to participate is determined by school board policies.[69][70] Susquehanna Township does not charge a fee for participation in extracurriculars.[71] In 2012, the Obama Administration's US Department of Education issued a directive that schools include students with disabilities in extracurricular activities, including sports.[72]

By Pennsylvania law, all K-12 students in the district, including those who attend a private nonpublic school, cyber charter school, charter school and those homeschooled, are eligible to participate in the extracurricular programs including all athletics. They must meet the same eligibility rules as the students enrolled in the district's schools.[73]

According to PA Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting Act 126 of 2014, all volunteer coaches and all those who assist in student activities, must have criminal background checks. Like all school district employees, they must also attend an anti child abuse training once every three years.[74][75][76]

Sports[edit]

Coaches receive compensation as outlined in the teachers' union contract. When athletic competition exceeds the regular season, additional compensation is paid.[77]

Susquehanna Township School District does not provide its athletics disclosure form on its web site.[78] Article XVI-C of the Public School Code requires the disclosure of interscholastic athletic opportunities for all public secondary school entities in Pennsylvania. All school entities with grades 7-12 are required to annually collect data concerning team and financial information for all male and female athletes beginning with the 2012-13 school year and submit the information to the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Beginning with the 2013-14 school year, all non-school (booster club and alumni) contributions and purchases must also be reported to PDE.[79]

According to Pennsylvania’s Safety in Youth Sports Act, all sports coaches, paid and volunteer, are required to annually complete the Concussion Management Certification Training and present the certification before coaching.[80][81]

Susquehanna Township SD does not charge a fee to participate in athletics. A joint Pennsylvania School Board Association and Pennsylvania State Athletic Directors Association survey, conducted in 2012, found nearly one third (30%) of public school respondents indicated charging individual students $10 to $250, with a statewide average of $65 per-sport.[82][83]

The District funds:

According to PIAA directory July 2015[84]

Notable Alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ SchoolDigger.com
  2. ^ National Center for Education, Common Core of Data - Susquehanna Township High School, 2010
  3. ^ National Center for Education Statistics, Common Care Data - Susquehanna Township High School, 2010
  4. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Professional Qualifications of Teachers Susquehanna Township High School, September 29, 2011
  5. ^ PDE, Graduation rate by LEA, 2015
  6. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "Susquehanna Township High School School Performance Profile 2014". 
  7. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, (November 6, 2014). "Susquehanna Township School District Fast Facts 2014,". 
  8. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susquehanna Township School District Fast Facts, December 2013
  9. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Susquehanna Township School District AYP Overview 2012, September 21, 2012
  10. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SUSQUEHANNA TOWNSHIP School District AYP Data Table, September 29, 2011
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (March 15, 2011). "New 4-year Cohort Graduation Rate Calculation Now Being Implemented". 
  12. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "Susquehanna Township Academic Achievement Report Card 2010 data table". 
  13. ^ Susquehanna Township School District Academic Achievement Report Card 2009
  14. ^ Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children (2008). "High School Graduation rate 2007" (PDF). 
  15. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "Susquehanna Township High School School Performance Profile 2015". 
  16. ^ Jan Murphy (November 4, 2015). "Report card for state's high schools show overall decline". Pennlive.com. 
  17. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "2015 Keystone Exam School Level Data". 
  18. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 6, 2014). "Susquehanna Township High School Academic Performance Data 2014". 
  19. ^ Evamarie Socha (November 6, 2014). "Half of Valley districts see state test scores decline". The Daily Item. 
  20. ^ Eleanor Chute (November 21, 2014). "Pennsylvania student scores declined with reduced funding, test results show". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 
  21. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (October 4, 2013). "Susquehanna Township High School Academic Performance Data 2013". 
  22. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, (September 21, 2012). "Susquehanna Township High School AYP Overview 2012,". 
  23. ^ US Department of Education (2003). "NCLB Parental Notices". 
  24. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 21, 2012). "School Improvement Grant". 
  25. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SUSQUEHANNA TWP High School - School AYP Overview 2011
  26. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SUSQUEHANNA TWP High School - School AYP Overview 2009
  27. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, SUSQUEHANNA TWP High School - School AYP Overview 2006
  28. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2014). "State Academic Standards". 
  29. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2014). "State Assessment System". 
  30. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 29, 2011). "2011-2012 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  31. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 29, 2011). "2010-2011 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  32. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (August 2008). "2007-2008 PSSA and AYP Results". 
  33. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2007). "PSSA Math and Reading results by School 2007". 
  34. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 21, 2012). "Susquehanna Township High School Academic Achievement Report Card 2012" (PDF). 
  35. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "2010 PSSAs: Reading, Math, Writing and Science Results". 
  36. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2009). "2009 PSSAs: Reading, Math, Writing and Science Results". 
  37. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 14, 2010). "Science PSSA 2010". 
  38. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (August 2008). "Science PSSA 2008 results". 
  39. ^ The Pennsylvania Basic Education/Higher Education Science and Technology Partnership, Science in Motion annual report, 2012
  40. ^ "Pennsylvania College Remediation Report". Pennsylvania Department of Education. January 2009. 
  41. ^ National Center for Education Statistics
  42. ^ PDE, School Performance profile, November 6, 2014
  43. ^ College Board (2014). "2014 College-Bound Seniors State Profile Report" (PDF). 
  44. ^ College Board (2013). "The 2013 SAT Report on College & Career Readiness". 
  45. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2011). "Public School SAT Scores 2011". 
  46. ^ College Board (September 2011). "SAT Scores State By State - Pennsylvania". 
  47. ^ "While U.S. SAT scores dip across the board, N.J. test-takers hold steady". NJ.com. September 2011. 
  48. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "Dual Enrollment Guidelines". 
  49. ^ Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement. site accessed March 2010.
  50. ^ Susquehanna Township School District Graduation Policy #5180
  51. ^ Eligibility for Graduation 2011
  52. ^ Pennsylvania General Assembly and the Pennsylvania Department of Education. "Pennsylvania Code §4.24 (a) High school graduation requirements". 
  53. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education, Proposed changes to Chapter 4, May 10, 2012
  54. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2010). "Keystone Exam Overview" (PDF). 
  55. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 2011). "Pennsylvania Keystone Exams Overview". 
  56. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education (2010). "Rules and Regulation Title 22 PA School Code CH. 4". 
  57. ^ Megan Harris (September 12, 2013). "Pennsylvania changing high school graduation requirements". Tribune Live. 
  58. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 2011). "Pennsylvania Keystone Exams Overview". 
  59. ^ Pennsylvania State Board of Education (2010). "Rules and Regulation Title 22 PA School Code CH. 4". 
  60. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, State Board of Education Finalizes Adoption of Pennsylvania Common Core State Academic Standards and High School Graduation Requirements, March 14, 2013
  61. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2011). "Keystone Exams". 
  62. ^ College Board (2014). "Exam Fees and Reductions: 2015". 
  63. ^ PDE, School Performance Profile - Academic Performance Data - Susquehanna Township High School, December 2014
  64. ^ Pennsylvania Auditor General Office (December 22, 2008). "Classrooms For the Future grants audit" (PDF). 
  65. ^ CAIU 15 (2007). "Project 720". 
  66. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2007). "Transforming Pennsylvania High Schools". 
  67. ^ Robert Hayes Postupac, PROJECT 720: A CASE STUDY OF HIGH SCHOOL REFORM, University of Pittsburgh, 2011
  68. ^ PA Office of the Budget, 2011-12 Budget General Fund - State Appropriations, June 28, 2011
  69. ^ Susquehanna Township School Board. "Susquehanna Township School District Academic Eligibility Policy". 
  70. ^ Susquehanna Township School Board. "Susquehanna Township School District Academic Eligibility policy #5035". 
  71. ^ DICK VanOLINDA, SPECIAL REPORT: Pay-to-play a growing trend in area school districts, The York Dispatch, 2011
  72. ^ US Department of Education, U.S. Department of Education Clarifies Schools' Obligation to Provide Equal Opportunity to Students with Disabilities to Participate in Extracurricular Athletics, January 25, 2013
  73. ^ Pennsylvania Office of the Governor Press Release (November 10, 2005). "Home-Schooled, Charter School Children Can Participate in School District Extracurricular Activities,". 
  74. ^ Eleanor Chute., New Pa. law expands clearance requirements for school volunteers, employees, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 15, 2014
  75. ^ Pennsylvania General Assembly (2014). "ACT 126 – Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting Act". 
  76. ^ Ali Stevens., Child Protective Services Law impacts schools, WKOK.com 1070AM, January 6, 2015
  77. ^ Susquehanna Township School Board, Susquehanna Township School District Teacher Union Contract, 2010
  78. ^ Susquehanna Township School District Administration (2014). "Susquehanna Township School District Athletics". 
  79. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2013). "Interscholastic Athletic Opportunities Disclosure Form" (PDF). 
  80. ^ PA General Assembly, (July 1, 2012). "Senate Bill 200 of Session 2011 Safety in Youth Sports Act". 
  81. ^ UMPC Sports Medicine (2014). "Managing Concussions in Student Athletes: The Safety in Youth Sports Act". 
  82. ^ Pennsylvania School Board Association Education Research & Policy Center, More PA school districts charging student participation fees, May 7, 2012
  83. ^ Pennsylvania School Board Association, Special Report on Pay-to-Play: Fees for Participation in Extracurricular Activities, August 2010
  84. ^ Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletics Association (2015). "PIAA School Directory". 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°18′00″N 76°50′34″W / 40.29998°N 76.84275°W / 40.29998; -76.84275