Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner

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Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner
Incumbent
Katy Bourne

since 21 November 2012
Police and crime commissioner of Sussex Police
Reports to Sussex Police and Crime Panel
Appointer Electorate of Sussex
(East Sussex, West Sussex and Brighton and Hove)
Term length Four years
Constituting instrument Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011
Precursor Sussex Police Authority
Inaugural holder Katy Bourne
Formation 21 November 2012
Deputy Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner
Salary £85,000
Website sussex-pcc.gov.uk

The Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner is the police and crime commissioner, an elected official tasked with setting out the way crime is tackled by Sussex Police in the English County of Sussex. The post was created on 21 November 2012, following an election held on 15 November 2012, and replaced the Sussex Police Authority. The current commissioner is Conservative Party politician Katy Bourne who was re-elected in May 2016. The police and crime commissioner is required to produce a strategic Sussex Police and Crime Plan, setting out the priorities for Sussex Police, and their work is scrutinised by the Sussex Police and Crime Panel.

The post was the first to be elected on a Sussex-wide basis since 1832 when the Sussex parliamentary constituency was replaced by constituencies for Sussex's eastern and western divisions.

Elections[edit]

The Police and Crime Commissioner is elected by the supplementary vote method for a fixed term of four years, although the inaugural term of the post was for three and a half years.

2012[edit]

The inaugural election took place on 21 November 2012 and was won by Katy Bourne. Voter turnout was low at 15.82 per cent.[1]

Sussex Commissioner election, 2012 [2][3][4]
Party Candidate 1st round 2nd round
 First round votes  Transfer votes 
Total Of round Transfers Total Of round
Conservative Katy Bourne 59,635 32% 20,393 80,028 {{{totalpercent}}}
Labour Godfrey Daniel 40,765 22% 14,837 55,602 {{{totalpercent}}}
Independent Ian Chisnall 38,930 21%
UKIP Tony Armstrong 29,327 15%
Liberal Democrat David Rogers 20,579 11%
Turnout 189,236 15.3%
Rejected ballots 5,982
Total votes 195,218
Conservative win

2016[edit]

Katy Bourne won re-election after second preference votes were counted, with Michael Jones coming second. Voter turnout was higher than in 2012 at 22.56 per cent. The central count was held at the East Sussex National Golf Course near Uckfield.[5]

Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner election, 2016
Party Candidate 1st round 2nd round
 First round votes  Transfer votes 
Total Of round Transfers Total Of round
Conservative Katy Bourne 114,570 41.78% 24,765 139,335 {{{totalpercent}}}
Labour Michael Jones 61,017 22.25% 25,375 86,392 {{{totalpercent}}}
UKIP Patrick Lowe 43,075 15.71%
Liberal Democrat James Walsh 29,550 10.77%
Green James Doyle 26,038 9.49%
Turnout 274,250 22.54%
Rejected ballots
Total votes
Registered electors
Conservative hold

Initiatives[edit]

Katy Bourne[edit]

Katy Bourne has worked on the development of 'live' link facilities that would allow police officers to give evidence in court cases from police stations, saving time and money.[6] She has also set up a youth commission in 2013.[7]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Improved Turnout at this Year's Sussex PCC Election". Bexhill Observer. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  2. ^ "Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner election results". Brighton and Hove City Council. 17 November 2012.
  3. ^ "Sussex PCC election: Conservative Katy Bourne wins vote". BBC News. 17 November 2012.
  4. ^ "Election Result". Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner. 16 November 2012.
  5. ^ "Improved Turnout at this Year's Sussex PCC Election". Bexhill Observer. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  6. ^ Shaw, Danny (26 April 2016). "Police chiefs: What impact have PCCs made?". BBC. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  7. ^ Millard, Rachel (28 September 2015). "Young People and Police Need to Get on Better, Commission Finds". The Argus. Retrieved 9 May 2016.