Sutton and Cheam (UK Parliament constituency)

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Sutton and Cheam
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Sutton and Cheam in Greater London
CountyGreater London
Electorate66,147 (December 2010)[1]
Current constituency
Created1945
Member of ParliamentPaul Scully (Conservative)
Created fromSurrey North-Eastern or 'Wimbledon'
Mid Surrey or 'Epsom'
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencyLondon

Sutton and Cheam is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. Since 2015, the seat has been held by Paul Scully, a Conservative.[n 2] The constituency voted Leave in the European Union membership referendum 2016[2]

History[edit]

Political history[edit]

The most notable event in the constituency's history was the huge 32.6% swing to the Liberal Party in the 1972 by-election.[3] Prior to this by-election, the constituency had only returned Conservative MPs, with the Liberal Party in third place behind Labour.

The seat is a marginal seat which has since 1970 frequently flipped between electing Conservative and Liberal/Liberal Democrat candidates. During the Conservative Government 1979-1990, the seat was won by a sufficient majority to be branded a Conservative safe seat. It was regained by the Liberal Democrats in the 1997 general election. The Conservatives regained the seat at the 2015 general election. The constituency voted Leave in the European Union membership referendum 2016.[2]

At the 2017 general election, the incumbent Conservative MP, Paul Scully, gained an 8.3% swing which moved the seat away from the typical "marginal" band of analysis: Scully won by a 24.4% majority. Due to the secret ballot only opinion polls can determine if this rise in popularity had more to do with the campaign of the Liberal Democrat candidate and/or the Conservatives picking up votes from the non-standing party UKIP, whose withdrawal was common in 2017 nationwide, following the vote to leave the EU. UKIP had 378 candidates across the UK, 346 fewer than in 2015.[4] Also not standing, and having lost their deposits in 2015, were two left-wing minor candidates. An 11.6% extra vote share was on hand for four parties as the candidate list fell from seven to four.

The seat had ranked from 2015 to 2017 the 39th-slimmest margin of majority, specifically in share of the vote as opposed to number of votes, among the 331 Conservative seats.[5] In third place, Labour's vote share almost doubled to 20.4%, their highest in Sutton and Cheam since 1970; a further swing of 3.4% of voters would have made Labour the closest challengers to the Conservatives, before the Liberal Democrats. The Conservatives finished in fourth place in the European Election 2019, trailing significantly behind the Liberal Democrats, the Brexit Party, and the Labour Party. [6]

Prominent members[edit]

Richard Sharples, the constituency's Conservative MP from 1954, was a former major in the army, and served as a Home Office Minister, before resigning his seat in 1972 to become Governor of Bermuda.

Boundaries[edit]

1945–1950: The Municipal Borough of Sutton and Cheam.

1950–1964: as above (from 1965 becoming wards of the London Borough of Sutton but not described as such in boundary legislation itself for a time).

1964–1978: The London Borough of Sutton wards of Belmont, Cheam North, Cheam South, Cheam West, Sutton Central, Sutton East, Sutton North, Sutton North East, Sutton South, Sutton South East, Worcester Park North, and Worcester Park South.

1978–2002: The London Borough of Sutton wards of Belmont, Cheam South, Cheam West, North Cheam, Rosehill, Sutton Central, Sutton Common, Sutton East, Sutton South, Sutton West, Worcester Park North, and Worcester Park South.

2002–present: The London Borough of Sutton wards of Belmont, Cheam, Nonsuch, Stonecot, Sutton Central, Sutton North, Sutton South, Sutton West, and Worcester Park.

Constituency profile[edit]

The area maintains separate schooling systems, with grammar schools and comprehensive schools, similar to Kingston upon Thames; it has more semi-detached, terraced and detached properties than the Greater London average.[7] Workless claimants, registered jobseekers, were in November 2012 significantly lower than the national average of 3.8%, at 2.1% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian.[8]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[9] Party Notes
1945 Sir Sidney Marshall Conservative Resigned 1954
1954 by-election Richard Sharples Conservative Resigned 1972
1972 by-election Graham Tope Liberal
Feb 1974 Sir Neil Macfarlane Conservative
1992 Lady Olga Maitland Conservative
1997 Paul Burstow Liberal Democrat
2015 Paul Scully Conservative

Elections[edit]

Results of UK House of Commons seat Sutton and Cheam, created in 1945

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

United Kingdom general election, 2019: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Bonnie Craven
Liberal Democrat Hina Bokhari[10][11]
Brexit Party Roland Foxcroft[12][13]
Green Claire Jackson-Prior[14]
General election 2017: Sutton and Cheam[15][16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Paul Scully 26,567 51.1 +9.6
Liberal Democrat Amna Ahmad 13,869 26.7 -7.0
Labour Bonnie Craven 10,663 20.5 +9.4
Green Claire Jackson-Prior 871 1.7 -0.4
Majority 12,698 24.4 +16.5
Turnout 51,970 73.8 +1.7
Registered electors 70,404
Conservative hold Swing +8.3
General election 2015: Sutton and Cheam[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Paul Scully 20,732 41.5 -0.8
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 16,811 33.7 -12.0
Labour Emily Brothers 5,546 11.1 +4.2
UKIP Angus Dalgleish 5,341 10.7 +8.7
Green Maeve Tomlinson 1,051 2.1 +1.6
National Health Action Dave Ash 345 0.7 N/A
TUSC Pauline Gorman 79 0.2 N/A
Majority 3,921 7.9 N/A
Turnout 49,905 72.1 -0.7
Registered electors 69,228
Conservative gain from Liberal Democrat Swing +5.6
General election 2010: Sutton and Cheam[19][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 22,156 45.7 −1.2
Conservative Philippa Stroud 20,548 42.4 +1.7
Labour Kathy Allen 3,376 7.0 −4.9
BNP John Clarke 1,014 2.1 N/A
UKIP David Pickles 950 2.0 N/A
Green Peter Hickson 246 0.5 N/A
English Democrat John Dodds 106 0.2 N/A
Christian Peoples Matthew Connolly 52 0.1 N/A
Libertarian Martin Cullip 41 0.1 N/A
Independents Federation UK Brian Hammond 19 0.0 N/A
Majority 1,608 3.3 −2.9
Turnout 48,508 72.8 +5.5
Registered electors 66,658
Liberal Democrat hold Swing −1.5

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General election 2005: Sutton and Cheam[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 19,768 47.1 -1.7
Conservative Richard Willis 16,922 40.4 +2.4
Labour Anand Shukla 4,954 11.8 -1.4
Rainbow Dream Ticket Rainbow George Weiss 288 0.7 +0.7
Majority 2,846 6.8 -4.0
Turnout 41,932 66.2 +3.8
Registered electors 62,885
Liberal Democrat hold Swing -2.0
General election 2001: Sutton and Cheam[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 19,382 48.8 +6.5
Conservative Olga Maitland 15,078 38.0 +0.1
Labour Lisa Homan 5,263 13.2 -2.2
Majority 4,304 10.8 +6.35
Turnout 39,723 62.4 -12.5
Registered electors 63,648
Liberal Democrat hold Swing +3.2

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General election 1997: Sutton and Cheam[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 19,919 42.30 +8.54
Conservative Olga Maitland 17,822 37.85 -17.33
Labour Mark Allison 7,280 15.5 +5.58
Referendum Peter Atkinson 1,784 3.8 N/A
UKIP Simon Mckie 191 0.4 N/A
Natural Law Deborah Wright 96 0.20 -0.26
Majority 2,097 4.45 N/A
Turnout 47,092 74.90 -7.50
Registered electors 62,824
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing -12.90
General election 1992: Sutton and Cheam[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Olga Maitland 27,710 55.18 -5.57
Liberal Democrat Paul Burstow 16,954 33.76 +5.15
Labour G. C. Martin 4,980 9.92 -0.72
Green J. Duffy 444 0.88 N/A
Natural Law A. Hatchard 133 0.26 N/A
Majority 10,756 21.42 -10.72
Turnout 50,221 82.40 +5.80
Registered electors 60,949
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General election 1987: Sutton and Cheam[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 29,710 60.75 +3.65
Liberal Robert Greig 13,992 28.61 -6.59
Labour Loraine Monk 5,202 10.64 +3.04
Majority 15,718 32.14 +10.24
Turnout 48,904 76.60 +2.30
Registered electors 63,850
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Sutton and Cheam[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 26,782 57.1 -0.9
Liberal C. Caswill 16,518 35.2 +8.8
Labour G.S. Dixon 3,568 7.6 -6.7
Majority 10,264 21.9 -9.7
Turnout 46,868 74.3 -4.5
Registered electors 63,099
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General election 1979: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 28,842 58.0 +10.4
Liberal Christopher Caswill 13,136 26.4 -10.1
Labour N. Irwin 7,126 14.3 -1.0
National Front J. Hunt 465 0.9 N/A
Independent J. Smoker 128 0.2 N/A
Majority 15,706 31.6 +20.5
Turnout 49,277 78.8 +1.9
Registered electors 63,038
Conservative hold Swing
General election October 1974: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 22,156 47.6 +2.2
Liberal Graham Tope 16,995 36.5 -5.5
Labour James Kenneth Rhodes 7,118 15.3 +2.7
Women's Rights Una Kroll 298 0.6 N/A
Majority 5,161 11.1 +7.6
Turnout 46,567 76.9 -5.7
Registered electors 60,559
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 22,555 45.4 -12.7
Liberal Graham Tope 20,836 42.0 +27.4
Labour James Kenneth Rhodes 6,270 12.6 -14.7
Majority 1,719 3.5 N/A
Turnout 49,661 82.6 +15.0
Registered electors 60,109
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
1972 Sutton and Cheam by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Graham Tope 18,328 53.6 +39.0
Conservative Neil Macfarlane 10,911 31.9 -26.2
Labour David Miller 2,937 8.6 -18.7
Anti-Common Market Chris Frere-Smith 1,332 3.9 N/A
National Independence Edgar Scruby 660 1.9 N/A
Majority 7,417 21.7 N/A
Turnout 34,194 56.3 -11.3
Registered electors
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +32.6
General election 1970: Sutton and Cheam[27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 23,957 58.1 +7.00
Labour John Dowsett 11,261 27.3 -2.99
Liberal Nicholas DM McGeorge 6,023 14.6 -4.01
Majority 12,696 30.8 +9.99
Turnout 41,241 67.6 -8.76
Registered electors 61,050
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General election 1966: Sutton and Cheam[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 22,331 51.10 -1.55
Labour Frank J Ward 13,235 30.29 +3.16
Liberal Nicholas DM McGeorge 8,134 18.61 -1.62
Majority 9,096 20.81 -4.71
Turnout 43,700 76.36 +2.09
Registered electors 57,227
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1964: Sutton and Cheam[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 22,975 52.65 -5.67
Labour Paul Derrick 11,839 27.13 +1.65
Liberal John Montgomerie 8,827 20.23 +4.02
Majority 11,136 25.52 -7.32
Turnout 43,641 74.27 -5.34
Registered electors 58,898
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General election 1959: Sutton and Cheam[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 27,344 58.32 -7.70
Labour Frank Judd 11,946 25.48 -8.50
Liberal John Montgomerie 7,600 16.21 N/A
Majority 15,398 32.84 +0.81
Turnout 46,890 79.61 +3.16
Registered electors 58,763
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Sutton and Cheam[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 29,538 66.02 +3.25
Labour Ronald M Lewis 15,205 33.98 -3.25
Majority 14,333 32.03 +6.50
Turnout 44,743 76.45 -5.23
Registered electors 58,529
Conservative hold Swing
1954 Sutton and Cheam by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Sharples 21,930 66.55 +3.78
Labour N. T. Poulter 11,023 33.45 -3.78
Majority 10,907 33.10 +7.57
Turnout 32,953 55.60 -26.08
Registered electors 59,292
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1951: Sutton and Cheam[32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Sidney Marshall 30,684 62.77 +5.84
Labour Eric KI Hurst 18,202 37.23 +2.71
Majority 12,482 25.53 +3.12
Turnout 58,886 81.68 -5.05
Registered electors 59,848
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1950: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Sidney Marshall 29,200 56.93 +10.89
Labour Helen O. Judd 17,706 34.52 -6.45
Liberal H. J. Wheeler 4,389 8.56 -4.45
Majority 11,494 22.41 +17.34
Turnout 51,295 86.73 +11.01
Registered electors 59,141
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General election 1945: Sutton and Cheam
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Sidney Marshall 19,431 46.04 N/A
Labour Helen O. Judd 17,293 40.97 N/A
Liberal J. P. Hughes 5,483 12.99 N/A
Majority 2,138 5.07 N/A
Turnout 42,207 75.72 N/A
Registered electors 55,742
Conservative win (new seat)

Other Elections[edit]

2019 European Parliament Election[edit]

Elected candidates are shown in bold. Brackets indicate the order candidates were elected and the number of votes per seat won in their respective columns.

European Election 2019: London Borough of Sutton, London[33]
List Candidates Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Irina Von Wiese (1)
Dinesh Dhamija (4)
Luisa Porritt (7)
Jonathan Fryer, Hussain Khan, Helen Cross, Graham Colley, Rabina Khan
18,706
32.8% N/A
Brexit Party Benyamin Habib (3)
Lance Forman (8)
Graham Shore, Alka Cuthbert, Jimi Ogunnusi, Simon Marcus, Mehrtash A'zami, Aileen Quinton
17,307
30.4% N/A
Labour Claude Moraes (2)
Seb Dance (6)
Katy Clark, Laura Parker, Murad Qureshi, Taranjit Kaur Chana, James Beckles, Sanchia Alasia
5,563
9.8% N/A
Conservative Syed Kamall, Charles Tannock, Joy Morrissey, Tim Barnes, Scott Pattenden, Attic Rahman, Kirsty Finlayson, Luke Parker 4,863
8.5% N/A
Green Scott Ainslie (5)
Gulnar Hasnain, Shahrar Ali, Rachel Collinson, Eleanor Margolies, Remco van der Stoep, Kirsten De Keyser, Peter Underwood
4,663
8.2% N/A
Change UK Gavin Esler, Jacek Rostowski, Carole Tongue, Annabel Mullin, Karen Newman, Nora Mulready, Jessica Simor, Haseeb Ur-Rehman 2,062
3.6% N/A
UKIP Gerard Batten, Richard Braine, Peter Muswell, Freddy Vachha, Robert Stephenson, Peter McIlvenna, John Poynton, Ronie Johnson 1,845
3.2% N/A
Animal Welfare Vanessa Hudson, Jane Smith, Sam Morland, Ranjan Joshi, Mina Da Rui, Jonathan Homan, Simon Gouldman 778
1.4% N/A
Women’s Equality Catherine Mayer, Bea Gare, Nanci Hogan, Aliyah Dunbar-Hussain, Hannah Barham-Brown, Alison Marshall, Olivia Vincenti, Leyla Mohan 541
1.0% N/A
UK EU Pierre Kirk, Richard Stevens, Saleyha Ahsan, Anna Novikova, Angela Antetomaso, Richard Boardman 456
0.8%x N/A
Independent Claudia Mcdowell 33 0.1% N/A
Independent Andrea Venzon 27 0.0% N/A
Independent Kofi Klu 22 0.0% N/A
Independent Roger Hallam 22 0.0% N/A
Independent Ian Sowden 13 0.0% N/A
Independent Daze Aghaji 11 0.0% N/A
Independent Andrew Medhurst 8 0.0% N/A
Independent Zoe Lafferty 8 0.0% N/A
Independent Mike Shad 6 0.0% N/A
Independent Alan Kirkby 5 0.0% N/A
Independent Henry Muss 5 0.0% N/A
Turnout 56,944 N/A

2016 EU membership referendum[edit]

European Union membership referendum 2016: London Borough of Sutton, London
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed Leave the European Union 57,241 53.7
Remain a member of the European Union 49,319 46.3
Total votes 106,560 100.00
Source: BBC

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Constituency Referendum Results". Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  3. ^ "BBC NEWS – UK – UK Politics – Memorable by-election results". bbc.co.uk.
  4. ^ Library, House of Commons (8 June 2017). "Who stood in the General Election 2017?".
  5. ^ List of Conservative MPs elected in 2015 by % majority UK Political.info. Retrieved 2017-01-29
  6. ^ "Estimated 2019 European Parliament election results by constituency". Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  7. ^ "2011 Census Interactive – ONS". ons.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 29 January 2016.
  8. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  9. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "S" (part 6)
  10. ^ "Liberal Democrat Parliamentary candidates". Mark Pack. 9 September 2019.
  11. ^ "Hina Bokhari selected for Sutton and Cheam constituency". Mark Pack. 8 September 2019.
  12. ^ https://roland4sutton.org/
  13. ^ https://twitter.com/TBPCarshWall/status/1168069868471631872
  14. ^ "Prospective General Election Candidates". Green Party. Retrieved 12 October 2019.
  15. ^ "Sutton & Cheam parliamentary constituency". BBC News.
  16. ^ http://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-7979/CBP-7979.pdf
  17. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  18. ^ https://www.sutton.gov.uk/news/article/202/election_results
  19. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 June 2011. Retrieved 2 May 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  21. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  22. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  23. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  24. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  25. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  26. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  27. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1970.
  28. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1966.
  29. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1964.
  30. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1959.
  31. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1955.
  32. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1951.
  33. ^ "Statement of Local Totals - 23 May 2019" (PDF). Retrieved 20 September 2019.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°21′43″N 0°12′32″W / 51.362°N 0.209°W / 51.362; -0.209