Suwa Domain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Takashima Castle, administrative centre of Suwa Domain

Suwa Domain (諏訪藩, Suwa-han) was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan. It is located in Shinano Province, Honshū. The domain was centered at Takashima Castle, located in what is now part of the town of Suwa in Nagano Prefecture.[1] It was also known as Takashima Domain (高島藩, Takashima-han).


History[edit]

The Suwa clan had ruled the area around Lake Suwa in Shinano Province since ancient times. The clan was defeated by Takeda Shingen in 1542. The final Suwa ruler, Suwa Yorishige was forced to commit seppuku; however, his nephew, Suwa Yoritada was spared as hereditary kannushi of Suwa Shrine[disambiguation needed]. After the Takeda clan was destroyed by an alliance of Oda Nobunaga and Tokugawa Ieyasu, Suwa Yoritada went into the service of the Tokugawa. Following the Siege of Odawara (1590), he was elevated to the status of daimyō with Sōja Domain, a 10,000 koku holding in Kōzuke Province. This was subsequently raised to 27,000 koku. In the meanwhile, Toyotomi Hideyoshi assigned the former Suwa territories in Shinano Province to Hineno Takayoshi. Hineno Takayoshi built Takashima Castle; however, in 1601, his son Hineno Yoshiaki, was demoted to Mibu Domain in Shimotsuke Province as his grandfather, Hineno Hironari had defected to the Osaka forces. The same year, Suwa Yoritada's son, Suwa Yorimizu, was allowed to reclaim his clan's ancestral lands as daimyō of Suwa Domain. His son, Suwa Tadatsune, was granted a 5000 koku increase for services during the Siege of Osaka, but his son, Suwa Tadaharu, gave 2000 koku away to his two younger brothers. The Suwa clan remained in control of the domain to the Meiji restoration.

During the Boshin War, the domain supported the imperial side, and participated in the Battle of Kōshū-Katsunuma, Battle of Hokuetsu and Battle of Aizu. In July 1871, with the abolition of the han system, Suwa Domain briefly became Takashima Prefecture, and was merged into the newly created Nagano Prefecture. Under the new Meiji government, Suwa Tadamasa, the next-to-last daimyo of Suwa Domain was given the kazoku peerage title of shishaku (viscount).

Bakumatsu period holdings[edit]

As with most domains in the han system, Suwa Domain consisted of several discontinuous territories calculated to provide the assigned kokudaka, based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2][3]

List of daimyo[edit]

# Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank kokudaka Notes
Kamon Hineno.jpg Hineno clan (tozama) 1590-1601 [4]
0 Hineno Takayoshi (日根野高吉) 1590-1600 Oribe-no-tsukasa (織部正) Lower 5th (従五位下) 27,000 koku pre-Tokugawa
1 Hineno Yoshiaki (日根野吉明) 1600-1601 Oribe-no-tsukasa (織部正) Lower 5th (従五位下) 27,000 koku transfer to Mibu Domain
Japanese crest Suwa Kajinoha(Black background).svg Suwa clan (fudai) 1601-1871 [5]
1 Suwa Yorimizu (諏訪頼水) 1601-1640 Inaba-no-kami (因幡守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 27,000 koku transfer from Sōja Domain
2 Suwa Tadatsune (諏訪忠恒) 1640-1657 Izumo-no-kami (出雲守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 27,000 -> 32,000 koku
3 Suwa Tadaharu (諏訪忠晴) 1657-1695 Inaba-no-kami (因幡守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 32,000 -> 30,000 koku
4 Suwa Tadatora (諏訪忠虎) 1695-1731 Aki-no-kami (安芸守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
5 Suwa Tadatoki (諏訪忠林) 1731-1763 Inaba-no-kami (因幡守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
6 Suwa Tadaatsu (諏訪忠厚) 1763-1781 Aki-no-kami (安芸守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
7 Suwa Tadakata (諏訪忠粛) 1781-1816 Ise-no-kami (伊勢守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
8 Suwa Tadamichi (諏訪忠恕) 1816-1840 Ise-no-kami (伊勢守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
9 Suwa Tadamasa (諏訪忠誠) 1840-1868 Inaba-no-kami (因幡守)) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku
10 Suwa Tadaaya (諏訪忠礼) 1868-1871 Ise-no-kami (伊勢守) Lower 5th (従五位下) 30,000 koku Domainal governor

See also[edit]

List of Han

References[edit]

  • The content of this article was largely derived from that of the corresponding article on Japanese Wikipedia.
  • Papinot, E (1910). Historical and Geographic Dictionary of Japan. Tuttle (reprint) 1972. 

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Takashima Castle" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-7-2.
  2. ^ Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  3. ^ Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.
  4. ^ Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Hineno" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 9; retrieved 2013-7-2.
  5. ^ Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Suwa" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 57; retrieved 2013-7-2.