Suzanne Steinbaum

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Suzanne Steinbaum
ResidenceNew York City, New York, United States
NationalityAmerican
Alma materTufts University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine
OccupationCardiology, women's health, author

Suzanne Steinbaum is a cardiologist and director of Women's Heart Health at the Heart and Vascular Institute, Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and author of Dr.Suzanne Steinbaum’s Heart Book: Every Woman’s Guide to a Heart Healthy Life. She is national spokesperson for Go Red for Women of the American Heart Association,[2] and is chairperson of Go Red in New York City, 2012–15.[3] She was named to the board of directors of the American Heart Association in New York City in 2014.[4] She is host of a weekly magazine news show, Focus on Health, seen in the N.Y. tristate area on WLNY-TV.[5]

Steinbaum has focused on the treatment of heart disease through education, early detection, and prevention. She lectures nationally on women and heart disease, coronary artery disease, natural and alternative ways of treating heart disease through lifestyle modification, and the prevention of heart disease. She has written on topics of cardiac prevention and nutrition and is used as an expert source by news and media outlets.[6]

Early life and education[edit]

Steinbaum was born in Cherry Hill, New Jersey to Eleanor and Frederick Steinbaum. Her nephews include Noah and Matthew Steinbaum. Prior to her 10th birthday, the family moved to Livingston, New Jersey. She attended Mt. Pleasant Middle School[citation needed] and then graduated from Livingston High School in 1986.[7] Steinbaum has completed fellowships in both preventive cardiology and non-invasive cardiology, with a subspecialty in prevention and women and heart disease. After graduating from Tufts University with a B.A., she attended the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine. After receiving her Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree, she trained at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City, in both internal medicine and cardiology. After achieving board certification, she became a fellow of the American College of Cardiology.[8]

Career[edit]

Steinbaum began her career as a rotating intern at St. Barnabas Hospital in The Bronx, and then went on to do a residency in Internal medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. While in her residency, Steinbaum met Steve Horowitz, chief of Cardiology at Beth Israel Center, who was conducting research for Dean Ornish’s Lifestyle Heart Trial at the Center for Cardiac and Pulmonary Health. Steinbaum later became medical director of the Center for Cardiac Health after completing her fellowship in Cardiology.

After observing women patients repeatedly misdiagnosed, or inadvertently neglected in the treatment of heart disease, her interest in women's hearts grew. While in her fellowship training, she focused on women's hearts, later receiving grant money to help women in receiving early detection and prevention. After joining Lenox Hill Hospital in 2006 to head the Women and Heart Disease Program, becoming a mother, going through a divorce and juggling her career, she wrote her book, Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum’s Heart Book: Every Woman’s Guide to a Heart-Healthy Life.[9]

She has been on network news health segments for ABC News and Good Morning America, NBC, CNN[10][11] and CBS News[12][13][14] and The Doctors as a consultant in the field of women and heart disease, preventive cardiology and topics of lifestyle management. She has featured on The Early Show, The Doctors, Good Morning America, The Dr. Steve Show,[clarification needed] Inside Edition, The Dr. Oz Show[15] and 20/20. She has written on topics of cardiac prevention and nutrition and has been quoted in many publications and magazines, such as Self, Glamour, More, Fitness, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal and Family Circle.[16] She is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post and to Dr. Oz's web site. She is a resource for on-line medical references including Healthday, WebMD, Live Science and Bottom Line Health.

From 2000 to 2012, Dr. Steinbaum served as medical director for the Young Professionals division of the American Heart Association.[17]

On behalf of the American Heart Association, Steinbaum is a national spokesperson for the Go Red for Women campaign. This position involves her with education, empowering and delivering the message about women and heart disease. She has lectured and taken part in radio and television.[18]

Steinbaum practices Transcendental Meditation and recommends it to her patients.[19]

Award and honors[edit]

In 2010, after serving as the Medical Director for the Young Professionals division of the American Heart Association, Steinbaum was awarded the American Heart Association's: Young Hearts Award for her Achievement in Cardiovascular Science and medicine.[20]

In 2012, Go Red for Women honored Dr. Steinbaum with the Women of Heart award, in recognition of leadership in Women's Heart Health in Westchester and Fairfield counties in New York and Connecticut.[8][21][22]

She is the recipient of the Castle and Connolly's Top Doctors award in Cardiovascular Disease for 2013 and 2014.[23]

Steinbaum was named Super Doctor by the New York Times in 2013 and 2014,[24] and has been included in New York Magazine’s selection of Top Doctors in 2013 and 2014.[25]

Author[edit]

Steinbaum has written articles which have been published in The Huffington Post, Everyday Health, The Dr. Oz Blog, LiveScience and CNN. The medical journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases published Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum's article "The Metabolic Syndrome: An Emerging Health Epidemic in Women" in its 2004 Volume 46, Issue 4 publication.[26]

In January 2013 Steinbaum wrote, "Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum's Heart Book: Every Woman's Guide to a Heart-Healthy Life, published by the Penguin Group. The book details the traditional risk factors for heart disease, including suggestions for how to control weight and blood pressure, and also discusses the role of emotional awareness and self-image in heart health. Steinbaum describes methods for integrating diet, exercise, sleep, and lifestyle.[27]

In 2014, Rodale Inc. published Lowering Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Drop Pounds and Slash Your Blood Pressure in 6 Weeks Without Drugs, which Steinbaum co-authored with Sarí Harrar.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Suzanne R. Steinbaum, DO". lenoxhillheartvascular.com. Archived from the original on 26 August 2014. Retrieved 15 July 2014.
  2. ^ "Go Red, Huffington Post Media Event". http://goredforwomen.org. American Heart Association. External link in |website= (help)
  3. ^ "New York City Go Red For Women Luncheon". http://www.nycgored.ahaevents.org/. American Heart Association. Retrieved 26 August 2014. External link in |website= (help)
  4. ^ "Board of Directors of the American Heart Association in New York City". Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  5. ^ "Focus on Health TV News Magazine Launches on November 2nd". Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum" (PDF). http://www.heart.org. American Heart Association. Retrieved 26 August 2014. External link in |website= (help)
  7. ^ "LEF Announces Hall of Fame Honorees". The Alternative Press. Retrieved 12 July 2014.
  8. ^ a b "Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum". Huffingtonpost. Retrieved 12 July 2014.
  9. ^ Steinbaum, Suzanne (2014). Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum's Heart Book: Every Woman's Guide to a Heart-Healthy Life. S.l.: Avery Pub Group. ISBN 978-1-58333-542-0.
  10. ^ Food Worth Dying For?; Heart Attack-Proof Your Life; Heart of the Matter CNN with Dr. Sanjay Gupta
  11. ^ New Study: Red Wine and Dark Chocolate Won’t Save Your Life"
  12. ^ Cholesterol Lowering Drugs CBS News
  13. ^ Young Women's Heart Disease Risk Worrisome. CBS News, The Early Show
  14. ^ Study: Blood Pressure Drug May Reduce Risk for Dementia CBS Local News, Pittsburgh
  15. ^ Do Women Make Better Doctors?
  16. ^ "Meet Dr. Steinbaum: Holistic, preventive women's cardiovascular care". Archived from the original on 2014-01-13.
  17. ^ "Steinbaum-Levine Family Biographies". Atsu.edu. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  18. ^ "The Wellness Blueprint". BlogTalkRadio. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  19. ^ "Dr. Steinbaum endorses meditation". TMhome.com. 6 February 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  20. ^ "American Heart Association Young Hearts Award" (PDF). nyumc.org. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  21. ^ "Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum's 10 Tips For Preventing Heart Disease". forbes.com. Retrieved 12 July 2014.
  22. ^ "Doctor details how to keep your heart healthy". FoxNews. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 12 July 2014.
  23. ^ "Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum is an attending cardiologist" (PDF). goredforwomenepk.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 August 2014. Retrieved 15 July 2014.
  24. ^ "Super Doctor by the New York Times in 2013 and 2014". http://superdoctors.com. Retrieved 26 August 2014. External link in |website= (help)
  25. ^ "New York Magazine's Top Doctors in Cardiovascular Disease in 2014". nymag.com. New York Magazine. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  26. ^ Steinbaum, Suzanne (January 2004). "The Metabolic Syndrome: An Emerging Health Epidemic in Women". Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases. 46 (4): 321–326. doi:10.1016/j.pcad.2003.08.005. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  27. ^ "Dr. Oz's Book Corner". http://www.doctoroz.com. The Dr. OZ Show. Retrieved 26 August 2014. External link in |website= (help)

External links[edit]